lnu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Golsteyn, B. H. H. & Stenberg, A. (2017). Earnings over the Life Course: General versus Vocational Education. Journal of Human Capital, 11(2), 167-212
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Earnings over the Life Course: General versus Vocational Education
2017 (English)In: Journal of Human Capital, ISSN 1932-8575, E-ISSN 1932-8664, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 167-212Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Two common hypotheses regarding the relative benefits of vocational versus general education are (1) that vocational skills enhance relative short-term earnings and (2) that general skills enhance relative long-term earnings. Empirical evidence for these hypotheses has remained limited. Based on Swedish registry data of individuals in short (2-year) upper secondary school programs, this study provides a first exploration of individuals' earnings across nearly complete careers. The descriptive earnings patterns indicate support for both hypotheses 1 and 2. The support holds when grade point average and family fixed effects are controlled for and also when enrollment in further education and fertility decisions are taken into account.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Chicago Press, 2017
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-66976 (URN)10.1086/691798 (DOI)000401624700001 ()2-s2.0-85019912176 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-07-20 Created: 2017-07-20 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved
Stenberg, A. & Westerlund, O. (2016). Flexibility at a cost - Should governments stimulate tertiary education for adults?. Journal of the Economics of Ageing, 7, 69-86
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Flexibility at a cost - Should governments stimulate tertiary education for adults?
2016 (English)In: Journal of the Economics of Ageing, ISSN 2212-828X, Vol. 7, p. 69-86Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most OECD countries experience high unemployment rates and declining growth in higher educational attainment. An often suggested government policy is therefore to allocate resources towards formal schooling for adults. However, returns on such investments are uncertain and the foregone earnings are potentially large. We use Swedish population register data from 1982 to 2011 to estimate average long run earnings returns on higher education for 29- to 55-year-olds who enrolled 1992-1993. We find substantial positive estimates, but these only fully emerge after approximately ten years. Nevertheless, calculations indicate that the benefits for society exceed the costs also under fairly pessimistic assumptions. Also, the estimated returns in this study are more than twice the size compared with earlier studies of Swedish adults who enrolled AE at the upper secondary level. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Adult education, Human capital, Earnings
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Economy, Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-70981 (URN)10.1016/j.jeoa.2016.01.001 (DOI)000377117700009 ()2-s2.0-84959514305 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-02-19 Created: 2018-02-19 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Stenberg, A. & Westerlund, O. (2015). Flexibility at a cost: should governments stimulate tertiary education for adults?. Linnaeus University Centre for Labour Market and Discrimination Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Flexibility at a cost: should governments stimulate tertiary education for adults?
2015 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Most OECD countries experience high unemployment rates and declining growth in higher educational attainment. An often suggested government policy is therefore to allocate resources towards formal schooling for adults. However, returns on such investments are uncertain and the foregone earnings are potentially large. We use Swedish population register data from 1982 to 2011 to estimate average long run earnings returns on higher education for 29- to 55-year-olds who enrolled 1992-1993. We find substantial positive estimates, but these only fully emerge after approximately ten years. Nevertheless, calculations indicate that the benefits for society exceed the costs also under fairly pessimistic assumptions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linnaeus University Centre for Labour Market and Discrimination Studies, 2015. p. 46
Series
Working paper series: Linnaeus University Centre for Labour Market and Discrimination Studies ; 2015:5
Keywords
Adult education, Human capital, Earnings
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economy, Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-50311 (URN)
Available from: 2016-03-07 Created: 2016-03-07 Last updated: 2019-08-07Bibliographically approved
Hederos Eriksson, K. & Stenberg, A. (2015). Gender identity and relative income within households: evidence from Sweden. Linnaeus University Centre for Labour Market and Discrimination Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender identity and relative income within households: evidence from Sweden
2015 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Bertrand et al. (2015) show that among married couples in the US, the distribution of the share of the household income earned by the wife exhibits a sharp drop just to the right of .50. They argue that this drop is consistent with a social norm prescribing that a man should earn more than his wife. We repeat this analysis for Sweden, ranked as one of the world’s most gender equal countries. Analyzing Swedish population register data, we do not find support for the norm that a man should earn more than his wife.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linnaeus University Centre for Labour Market and Discrimination Studies, 2015. p. 28
Series
Working paper series: Linnaeus University Centre for Labour Market and Discrimination Studies ; 2015:13
Keywords
Gender roles, Marriage market, Gender gap, Gender identity
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economy, Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-50625 (URN)
Available from: 2016-03-11 Created: 2016-03-11 Last updated: 2019-08-07Bibliographically approved
Stenberg, A. & Westerlund, O. (2015). The long-term earnings consequences of general vs. specific training of the unemployed. IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, 4(1), Article ID 22.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The long-term earnings consequences of general vs. specific training of the unemployed
2015 (English)In: IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, E-ISSN 2193-9012, Vol. 4, no 1, article id 22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Training programs for the unemployed typically involve training specific skills in demand amongst employers. In 1997, Swedish unemployed could also choose general schooling at the upper secondary level. This offers a unique opportunity to assess the theoretically ambiguous long-term relative earnings of general vs. specific training for unemployed. Analyzing detailed administrative data 1990–2010, we find 1) that specific training is associated with higher earnings in the short run, 2) that earnings converge 5–7 years post program and 3) that individuals act on their comparative advantages. When we extrapolate our estimates to life-time earnings, there is overall a relative advantage of specific training. However, for females with limited prior education, we find a relative life-time earnings advantage of general training. JEL-codes: I21, J62, J68 © 2015, Stenberg and Westerlund.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2015
Keywords
Active labor market programs, Adult education, Earnings, Vocational training
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economy, Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-57119 (URN)10.1186/s40174-015-0047-9 (DOI)000215332100021 ()2-s2.0-84983317392 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-10-14 Created: 2016-10-07 Last updated: 2018-05-18Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3024-9862

Search in DiVA

Show all publications