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Sivefors, P. (2020). Representing Masculinity in Early Modern English Satire, 1590–1603: "A Kingdom for a Man". New York: Routledge
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Representing Masculinity in Early Modern English Satire, 1590–1603: "A Kingdom for a Man"
2020 (engelsk)Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

Engaging with Elizabethan understandings of masculinity, this book examines representations of manhood during the short-lived vogue for verse satire in the 1590s, by poets like John Donne, John Marston, Everard Guilpin and Joseph Hall. While criticism has often used categorical adjectives like "angry" and "Juvenalian" to describe these satires, this book argues that they engage with early modern ideas of manhood in a conflicted and contradictory way that is frequently at odds with patriarchal norms even when they seem to defend them. The book examines the satires from a series of contexts of masculinity such as husbandry and early modern understandings of age, self-control and violence, and suggests that the images of manhood represented in the satires often exist in tension with early modern standards of manhood. Beyond the specific case studies, while satire has often been assumed to be a "male" genre or mode, this is the first study to engage more in depth with the question of how satire is invested with ideas and practices of masculinity.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
New York: Routledge, 2020. s. 162
Serie
Routledge Studies in Renaissance and Early Modern Worlds of Knowledge ; 10
Emneord
masculinity, manhood, satire, Elizabethan literature, early modern satire, masculinity and self-control, masculinity and violence, masculinity and husbandry, age and manhood, John Donne, John Marston, Joseph Hall, Everard Guilpin, John Weever, Ben Jonson, Juvenal
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Humaniora, Engelska med litteraturvetenskaplig inriktning; Humaniora, Litteraturvetenskap
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-92698 (URN)9780367463519 (ISBN)9781003028369 (ISBN)
Forskningsfinansiär
Swedish Research Council, 2016-02616
Tilgjengelig fra: 2020-03-05 Laget: 2020-03-05 Sist oppdatert: 2020-03-20bibliografisk kontrollert
Sivefors, P. (2019). "A kingdom for a man": The troubled male of Marston's verse satires. In: Presented at Conference 2019, The Marston Effect: John Marston and Early Modern Culture: Lincoln College, Oxford. 29 to 31 March 2019. Paper presented at Conference 2019, The Marston Effect: John Marston and Early Modern Culture. Lincoln College, Oxford. 29 to 31 March 2019. Leeds: University of Leeds
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>"A kingdom for a man": The troubled male of Marston's verse satires
2019 (engelsk)Inngår i: Presented at Conference 2019, The Marston Effect: John Marston and Early Modern Culture: Lincoln College, Oxford. 29 to 31 March 2019, Leeds: University of Leeds , 2019Konferansepaper, Oral presentation only (Annet vitenskapelig)
Abstract [en]

Recent years have seen extensive research in fields such as early modern masculinities, violence and the passions, although rarely so in connection with satire. This is despite the fact that the angry male satirist has been at the focus of much criticism of Elizabethan satire, particularly Marston’s, since Alvin Kernan’s seminal The Cankered Muse (1959). The present paper suggests that Marston’s verse satire enacts early modern notions of masculinity, although not simply in the sense of reproducing patriarchal norms. Despite their enthusiastic, Juvenalian attacks on all sorts of male depravity, Marston’s satires do not offer a straightforward reproductions of traditional norms. Rather, through the varying registers of the satirist – which far from always embody the standard ‘angry’ persona – and the tendency to aggressively challenge the reader and various people in the poems, Marston’s satires in one sense explore alternative, non-patriarchal codes of male competition. At the same time, the satirist explicitly denies involvement in typical rituals of male bonding such as drinking and drunkenness. In other words, Marston’s satirical stance involves the fashioning of a deliberately extreme male that stands outside early modern ideals of self-control but also in some respects rejects the notion of excess. Stoicism and Calvinism, both of which have been discussed as ideological frameworks for Marston’s satires, do not offer reassurance in this respect; rather, the paper concludes, the very extremity of Marston’s persona can be said to challenge the (male) reader to himself find an answer to the question: what is a man?

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Leeds: University of Leeds, 2019
Emneord
John Marston, satire, Elizabethan satire, early modern literature, masculinity
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Humaniora, Engelska med litteraturvetenskaplig inriktning; Humaniora, Litteraturvetenskap
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81576 (URN)
Konferanse
Conference 2019, The Marston Effect: John Marston and Early Modern Culture. Lincoln College, Oxford. 29 to 31 March 2019
Forskningsfinansiär
Swedish Research Council, 2016-02616
Tilgjengelig fra: 2019-04-01 Laget: 2019-04-01 Sist oppdatert: 2019-04-09bibliografisk kontrollert
Sivefors, P. (2019). Class, Commerce and the Bard: The Migration of Shakespeare into Sweden, 1770 – 1820. In: ESRA Conference, European Shakespeare Research Association: Shakespeare and European Geographies: Centralities and Elsewheres. Rome 9-12 July 2019. Paper presented at ESRA Conference, European Shakespeare Research Association. Shakespeare and European Geographies: Centralities and Elsewheres. Rome 9-12 July 2019.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Class, Commerce and the Bard: The Migration of Shakespeare into Sweden, 1770 – 1820
2019 (engelsk)Inngår i: ESRA Conference, European Shakespeare Research Association: Shakespeare and European Geographies: Centralities and Elsewheres. Rome 9-12 July 2019, 2019Konferansepaper, Oral presentation only (Annet vitenskapelig)
Abstract [en]

If anything, the migration of Shakespeare into Sweden was complex and fraught with uncertainties. The scant existing documentation of performances in the 18thcentury indicates that the introduction of Shakespeare often took the route via French or German translations, although in some cases there are clear indications that English was the source language. Gothenburg, on the west coast of Sweden, had lively contacts with Great Britain and it was also here that for example Hamlet was staged the first time. Notably, Shakespeare was not performed in the capital of Stockholm until the 1810s: it was theatres in provincial towns like Gothenburg and Norrköping that introduced Shakespeare, in various versions, to the Swedish stage. In the light of this historical development, the present paper argues that the migration of Shakespeare into the country was strongly linked to the rise of a wealthy provincial bourgeoisie, often with economic connections in England and Scotland. Once Shakespeare begun to be staged in the capital, it was for different reasons, involving the rise of literary Romanticism, and from the horizon of a Europe that had been affected by the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars. Thus, the paper concludes, the early history of Shakespeare in Sweden was not so much the result of national projects or specific agendas as the consequence of an emerging class restructuring and economic interests.

Emneord
Shakespeare, migration, theatre history, eighteenth-century studies, history of Shakespeare in Sweden, history of Shakespeare in Scandinavia
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Humaniora, Engelska med litteraturvetenskaplig inriktning; Humaniora, Litteraturvetenskap
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-87921 (URN)
Konferanse
ESRA Conference, European Shakespeare Research Association. Shakespeare and European Geographies: Centralities and Elsewheres. Rome 9-12 July 2019
Tilgjengelig fra: 2019-08-13 Laget: 2019-08-13 Sist oppdatert: 2019-08-20bibliografisk kontrollert
Sivefors, P. (2019). Masculinity and husbandry in Joseph Hall's Virgidemiarum. Renaissance Studies, 33(2), 204-221
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Masculinity and husbandry in Joseph Hall's Virgidemiarum
2019 (engelsk)Inngår i: Renaissance Studies, ISSN 0269-1213, E-ISSN 1477-4658, Vol. 33, nr 2, s. 204-221Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Verse satire from Roman times and onward draws extensively on gender stereotypes in its depictions of urban and decadent men. While clearly drawing on such literary traditions, Joseph Hall's Virgidemiarum (1597–98) spans over a wider register in emphasising both rural and urban contexts, and in focusing specifically on aspects of husbandry, pedigree and provision. Rather than being simply classical imitation, the failed men of Hall's satires should be understood from the economic context of early modern masculinity, which constituted manhood in terms of pedigree and providing for one's household. Unlike other Elizabethan satire, which predominantly attacks sexual vice as an urban phenomenon, Virgidemiarum depicts flawed manhood in broader terms of failed husbandry. In doing so, the essay contends, Hall's satires re‐enact changes in social structure and in the conceptions of masculinity at the time.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Emneord
Joseph Hall, Elizabethan satire, early modern satire, masculinity, husbandry
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Humaniora, Engelska med litteraturvetenskaplig inriktning; Humaniora, Litteraturvetenskap
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81117 (URN)10.1111/rest.12390 (DOI)000461858500003 ()2-s2.0-85041229482 (Scopus ID)
Forskningsfinansiär
Swedish Research Council, 2016-02616
Tilgjengelig fra: 2019-03-15 Laget: 2019-03-15 Sist oppdatert: 2019-04-05bibliografisk kontrollert
Sivefors, P. (2019). Observation, Control and Sir Thomas More. LIR.journal, 10, 28-38
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Observation, Control and Sir Thomas More
2019 (engelsk)Inngår i: LIR.journal, ISSN 1102-9773, Vol. 10, s. 28-38Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

It is hardly controversial to say that the Elizabethan play Sir Thomas More (1592–93?) is insistently preoccupied with issues of surveillance, control and punishment. In its depiction of the Ill May Day Riots in 1517 and the subsequent downfall of Thomas More, the play represents both More’s role as surveyor of the crowd and a victim of royal surveillance and punishment. However, in its twists and turns of plot Sir Thomas More transcends generalizations about penal justice. While not staging a “pre-panoptic” system of control, the play frequently but ironically thematizes surveillanceas an instrument of power, but it falls short of suggesting that surveillance produces pliable individuals. Instead, Sir Thomas More comes close to suggesting repentance rather than retribution as a model of justice, though this model is also made problematic through the character of Thomas More. 

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Gothenburg: University of Gothenburg, 2019
Emneord
Sir Thomas More, Elizabethan drama, early modern literature, early modern theatre, surveillance, control
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Humaniora, Engelska med litteraturvetenskaplig inriktning; Humaniora, Litteraturvetenskap
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-82475 (URN)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2019-05-08 Laget: 2019-05-08 Sist oppdatert: 2019-08-06bibliografisk kontrollert
Sivefors, P. (2019). Satire, Age, and Manliness in Everard Guilpin’s Skialetheia. English literary renaissance, 49(2), 201-223
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Satire, Age, and Manliness in Everard Guilpin’s Skialetheia
2019 (engelsk)Inngår i: English literary renaissance, ISSN 0013-8312, E-ISSN 1475-6757, Vol. 49, nr 2, s. 201-223Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

The present essay suggests that Everard Guilpin’s collection of satirical poetry, Skialetheia (1598), is entrenched in early modern notions of age and masculinity. While criticism has claimed that Guilpin’s satirical persona is mostly inconsistent and self-contradictory, this essay argues that Skialetheia is structured around a model of progression toward manly self-control. The epigrams, placed before the satires, and the first three satires predominantly rely on flyting, aggression, and a reckless, “youthful” persona whereas the three last satires increasingly come to emphasize distancing, composure, and Stoical as well as proverbial wisdom—features that are consistent with Renaissance constructions of masculinity around notions of self-control. In other words, while Elizabethan satire has often been noted both for its aggressive and violent character and for the youth of the men who mostly wrote it, Skialetheia to some extent demonstrates an aesthetic and moral distancing from such dimensions. In a wider sense, the essay therefore suggests that previous views of Elizabethan satire as consistently “angry” or “low” in style need to be re-considered. 

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2019
Emneord
satire, Elizabethan literature, early modern poetry, Everard Guilpin, masculinity, age
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Humaniora, Engelska med litteraturvetenskaplig inriktning; Humaniora, Litteraturvetenskap
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81911 (URN)10.1086/702635 (DOI)000465325300003 ()2-s2.0-85064315852 (Scopus ID)
Forskningsfinansiär
Swedish Research Council, 2016-02616
Tilgjengelig fra: 2019-04-12 Laget: 2019-04-12 Sist oppdatert: 2019-08-29bibliografisk kontrollert
Sivefors, P. (2018). A Kingdom for a Man: Representing Masculinity in Late Elizabethan Verse Satire. In: The 64th Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America: New Orleans, 22 March - 24 March 2018. Paper presented at The 64th Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America : New Orleans, 22 March - 24 March 2018. All Academic
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>A Kingdom for a Man: Representing Masculinity in Late Elizabethan Verse Satire
2018 (engelsk)Inngår i: The 64th Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America: New Orleans, 22 March - 24 March 2018, All Academic , 2018Konferansepaper, Oral presentation only (Annet vitenskapelig)
Abstract [en]

The present paper suggests that the representations of manhood in Elizabethan satire mobilized cultural and sexual values at odds with prevailing masculine ideals of self-control. Thus, the paper investigates to what extent the conventions and conditions of early modern satire imply redefinitions of or challenges to early modern masculinity. While other types of poetry often explore emotional weakness such as tears or effeminacy, even representing ‘alternative’ masculinities, satire is extensively preoccupied with other forms of flawed manhood, such as the angry, dissolute or reckless man. Elizabethan satire explores countercodes of manly conduct, although such countercodes are manifestly different from the ‘soft’ or ‘effeminate’ man of much lyric poetry. Instead, the disorderly and unruly manhood in Elizabethan satire should be understood as an interrogation of classical genre conventions that also responds to early modern patriarchal notions of moderation.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
All Academic, 2018
Emneord
Satire, masculinity, Elizabethan literature, early modern literature, Joseph Hall, John Marston, Everard Guilpin
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Humaniora, Engelska med litteraturvetenskaplig inriktning; Humaniora, Litteraturvetenskap
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-71831 (URN)
Konferanse
The 64th Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America : New Orleans, 22 March - 24 March 2018
Forskningsfinansiär
Swedish Research Council, 2016-02616
Tilgjengelig fra: 2018-03-27 Laget: 2018-03-27 Sist oppdatert: 2018-05-21bibliografisk kontrollert
Sivefors, P. (2018). A supposed quotation from Augustine in Thomas Nashe's Christs teares over Jerusalem. Notes and Queries, 65(1), 49-49
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>A supposed quotation from Augustine in Thomas Nashe's Christs teares over Jerusalem
2018 (engelsk)Inngår i: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 65, nr 1, s. 49-49Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Oxford University Press, 2018
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Humaniora, Litteraturvetenskap
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72024 (URN)10.1093/notesj/gjx216 (DOI)000427001100019 ()2-s2.0-85043300651 (Scopus ID)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2018-03-29 Laget: 2018-03-29 Sist oppdatert: 2019-08-29bibliografisk kontrollert
Sivefors, P. (2018). Dreams, Autobiography and the Upward Journey in Girolamo Cardano's De vita propria liber. In: Frida Forsgren, Tor Vegge (Ed.), Hagiographic Adaptations: (pp. 83-97). Pisa: Fabrizio Serra Editore
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Dreams, Autobiography and the Upward Journey in Girolamo Cardano's De vita propria liber
2018 (engelsk)Inngår i: Hagiographic Adaptations / [ed] Frida Forsgren, Tor Vegge, Pisa: Fabrizio Serra Editore, 2018, s. 83-97Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

This essay argues that the dream narratives in Girolamo Cardano’s autobiography De vita proper liber (written 1575) share important characteristics with the didactic and exemplary uses of dreams in late classical and medieval hagiography. While not a piece of hagiography in itself, Cardano’s book features dreams with a particularly rich indebtedness to Christian and hagiographic devices such as the “upward ascent” narrative also found in saints’ dreams. Moreover, Cardano’s dreams, the Christian element of which has been underplayed by scholars, also posit the dreamer as a mediator between God and audience in ways that my article relates to the exemplary force in divine dreams. Thus, in the extension the article also deals with how to mediate dreams (editing them, writing them down, conferring authority on them) and investigates the senses in which dreams achieved status as “true” or “prophetic”.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Pisa: Fabrizio Serra Editore, 2018
Serie
Early modern and modern studies, ISSN 1828-2164 ; 10
Emneord
dreams, dreams in literature, Renaissance literature, Girolamo Cardano, autobiography, life writing, hagiography
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Humaniora, Litteraturvetenskap
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-73791 (URN)978-88-3315-115-1 (ISBN)978-88-3315-116-8 (ISBN)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2018-05-03 Laget: 2018-05-03 Sist oppdatert: 2018-09-25bibliografisk kontrollert
Sivefors, P. (2018). “Heere may I sit, yet walke to Westminster”: Urban Peregrination in Elizabethan Verse Satire. In: Walking and Wandering in Early Modern Culture and Literature: A joint London Renaissance Seminar / Paris Early Modern Seminar Conference, 21-22 June 2018. Paper presented at Walking and Wandering in Early Modern Culture and Literature : A joint London Renaissance Seminar / Paris Early Modern Seminar Conference, 21-22 June 2018.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>“Heere may I sit, yet walke to Westminster”: Urban Peregrination in Elizabethan Verse Satire
2018 (engelsk)Inngår i: Walking and Wandering in Early Modern Culture and Literature: A joint London Renaissance Seminar / Paris Early Modern Seminar Conference, 21-22 June 2018, 2018Konferansepaper, Oral presentation only (Annet vitenskapelig)
Abstract [en]

Central to verse satire since its Roman inception, walking, particularly in city space, is an integral element also to Elizabethan satirical poetry. Rather than assume a strict pattern of imitation from Roman to Elizabethan, however, this paper argues that the device of the city walk in satirists such as Donne, Guilpin and Marston responds to pattern of urbanisation in the late 16th century as well as new forms of representing city space in visual and conceptual terms. To these poets, the city becomes a space that is both traversable and mappable, and rather than simply describe urban territory, satirical writing also – in Michel de Certau’s words – ‘manipulates spatial organization’.

Emneord
satire, Elizabethan poetry, walking, wandering, Everard Guilpin, John Donne
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Humaniora, Engelska med litteraturvetenskaplig inriktning; Humaniora, Litteraturvetenskap
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77737 (URN)
Konferanse
Walking and Wandering in Early Modern Culture and Literature : A joint London Renaissance Seminar / Paris Early Modern Seminar Conference, 21-22 June 2018
Forskningsfinansiär
Swedish Research Council, 2016-02616
Tilgjengelig fra: 2018-09-13 Laget: 2018-09-13 Sist oppdatert: 2018-10-26bibliografisk kontrollert
Organisasjoner
Identifikatorer
ORCID-id: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2469-6431