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Lindahl, M. & Lundin, M. (2019). Att göra etiska överväganden kring stoff och arbetssätt kring medicinska frågor: [ ingår i Lärportalens modul Medicin, hälsa och ohälsa, Del 3: Etik i klassrummet, gymnasieskolan ]. Stockholm: Skolverket
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Att göra etiska överväganden kring stoff och arbetssätt kring medicinska frågor: [ ingår i Lärportalens modul Medicin, hälsa och ohälsa, Del 3: Etik i klassrummet, gymnasieskolan ]
2019 (svensk)Annet (Annet vitenskapelig)
sted, utgiver, år, sider
Stockholm: Skolverket, 2019. s. 16
Serie
Lärportalen
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Naturvetenskap, Naturvetenskap med utbildningsvetenskaplig inriktning
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-80129 (URN)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2019-02-01 Laget: 2019-02-01 Sist oppdatert: 2019-03-06bibliografisk kontrollert
Lundin, M. & Torpsten, A.-C. (2018). The ’flawless’ school and the problematic actors: research on policy documents to counteract discrimination and degrading treatment in schools in Sweden. European Journal of Education, 53(4), 574-585
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>The ’flawless’ school and the problematic actors: research on policy documents to counteract discrimination and degrading treatment in schools in Sweden
2018 (engelsk)Inngår i: European Journal of Education, ISSN 0141-8211, E-ISSN 1465-3435, Vol. 53, nr 4, s. 574-585Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

In Sweden, the anti‐discrimination initiatives and the efforts against degrading treatment are promoted by two laws indicating self‐regulatory and transparent actions toward preventing both. To be successful, it is important that everybody involved in the work has the same understanding of the task and that everybody understands written formulations of local policy documents, here labelled eq‐uity plans, in order not to reinforce inequalities when counteracting discrimination and degrading treatment. Our aim is to explore the world‐views that are expressed by the schools in their equity plans. We ask what are the perceived causes of discrimination and degrading treat‐ment within the schools, what solutions in the equity plans emerge and which subject positions are constructed and made possible. The analysis rendered three discourses of which we can see recurring signs in the material and these have been labelled The perfect school discourse, The desig‐nated discourse and The educational discourse. These dis‐courses are different in how they relate to discrimination and degrading treatment in school and they also provide different opportunities for students. We conclude that policy‐making is important as a means to change discrimi‐natory patterns and we suggest how to avoid drawing on discourses that are likely to counteract the goals.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Emneord
discrimination policy work
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Pedagogik och Utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik; Pedagogik och Utbildningsvetenskap; Pedagogik och Utbildningsvetenskap
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78208 (URN)10.1111/ejed.12306 (DOI)000449687800012 ()2-s2.0-85054547970 (Scopus ID)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2018-10-08 Laget: 2018-10-08 Sist oppdatert: 2019-08-29bibliografisk kontrollert
Torpsten, A.-C. & Lundin, M. (2017). Policy documents to counteract discrimination and degrading treatment in schools. In: : . Paper presented at 10 nordiska konferensen om språk och kön, Akureyri 20-21 October.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Policy documents to counteract discrimination and degrading treatment in schools
2017 (engelsk)Konferansepaper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

In Sweden the anti-discrimination initiatives and the efforts against degrading treatment are promoted by two laws (SFS, 2008:567; SFS 2010:800). Our aim is to explore and understand the self-regulatory efforts to prevent discrimination and degrading treatment in school. We examine Swedish school equity plans asking what the causes of discrimination and degrading treatment within the schools are and what solutions emerge and which subject positions are constructed and made possible? Documents from all compulsory schools in six municipalities are collected.

In a discourse analysis we focus on how the phenomenon is expressed. We constructed a definition of a problem and or each problem we search for possible subject positions. At a first stage, various recurring ideas were found in the texts. These were gathered with respect to their expressions of degrading treatment and discrimination in their own educational setting. To uncover the ways of understanding the reasons for the occurring school problems, we searched for solutions that are related to the school problems presented. As a second step, we addressed the identified discourses to find out what subject positions are made possible.

The analysis has rendered three discourses. The perfect school discourse – rejects the occurrence of degrading treatment and discrimination. Everybody feels safe and there are no needs for solutions. In this perfect school the only subject position is the perfect student. In The designated discourse, non-complying students cause problems and the solution is to educate these students. In this discourse there are two subject positions, the non-complier and the functioning student. In The educational discourse, problems are dominant norms that provide inequalities and the solutions are questioning and criticizing norms, taking care of each other’s and self-reflection. In this discourse there is one subject position, the active fellow. 

HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Pedagogik och Utbildningsvetenskap
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-68460 (URN)
Konferanse
10 nordiska konferensen om språk och kön, Akureyri 20-21 October
Tilgjengelig fra: 2017-10-26 Laget: 2017-10-26 Sist oppdatert: 2019-01-16bibliografisk kontrollert
Magnus, C. D. & Lundin, M. (2017). University students' views on heteronormativity: a concept to facilitate students' reflections on heteronormativity and what we have learnt from it. In: Presented at the AERA 2017 Annual Meeting, San Antonio, USA, April 28-30, 2017: . Paper presented at AERA 2017 Annual Meeting, San Antonio, USA, April 28-30, 2017.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>University students' views on heteronormativity: a concept to facilitate students' reflections on heteronormativity and what we have learnt from it
2017 (engelsk)Inngår i: Presented at the AERA 2017 Annual Meeting, San Antonio, USA, April 28-30, 2017, 2017Konferansepaper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

This paper elaborates on the results of a qualitative study on heteronormativity and introduces a reflective seminar concept invented and designed for this purpose. The model aims at facilitating students' ability to reflect on heteronormativity. Challenging their thinking about heteronormative practices, we asked students to use it and thereby reflect in three consecutive steps upon the impact of heterosexuality in educational situations. The results showed a contradiction between the students’ positive attitudes towards equality and a lack of ideas of how to promote it. This indicates a lack of opportunities for students in to reflect. Addressing aspects of diversity such as sexual identities and orientations, we suggest that our reflective model is a very useful tool to promote reflective processes.

HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Samhällsvetenskap, Genusvetenskap
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-69948 (URN)
Konferanse
AERA 2017 Annual Meeting, San Antonio, USA, April 28-30, 2017
Tilgjengelig fra: 2018-01-18 Laget: 2018-01-18 Sist oppdatert: 2018-01-18bibliografisk kontrollert
Magnus, C. D. & Lundin, M. (2016). Challenging Norms: University Students' Views on Heteronormativity as a Matter of Diversity and Inclusion in Initial Teacher Education. International Journal of Educational Research, 79, 76-85
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Challenging Norms: University Students' Views on Heteronormativity as a Matter of Diversity and Inclusion in Initial Teacher Education
2016 (engelsk)Inngår i: International Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0883-0355, E-ISSN 1873-538X, Vol. 79, s. 76-85Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Diversity, as seen in this article from a sexual orientation perspective, is currently an emerging topic on many levels in Europe. This article sets out to examine how future teachers and educators articulate that very aspect of diversity; normative ideas about sexuality that tend to oppress and that are related to educational settings. The understanding of how future educators engage in this topic is a key factor for future work promoting the inclusion of lesbian, gay, transgender, intersex and queer (LGBTIQ) people in schools and enriching school life for all. This supports establishing a positive climate, which ultimately helps students to thrive in a democratic environment (Lerner & Boyd, 2013). This is a challenge on all levels of the educational system: policy- and governance-wise as well as on the level of institutions and individuals.

Emneord
diversity, heteronormativity, teacher education, LGBT, qualitative research
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Pedagogik och Utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-54063 (URN)10.1016/j.ijer.2016.06.006 (DOI)000384859300008 ()
Tilgjengelig fra: 2016-06-21 Laget: 2016-06-21 Sist oppdatert: 2017-11-28bibliografisk kontrollert
Lundin, M. (2016). Homo- and bisexual teachers’ ways of relating to the heteronorm. International Journal of Educational Research, 75, 67-75
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Homo- and bisexual teachers’ ways of relating to the heteronorm
2016 (engelsk)Inngår i: International Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0883-0355, E-ISSN 1873-538X, Vol. 75, s. 67-75Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Although legislation has made achievements to strengthen  the rights of  homosexual people in many European countries, the school setting seems to be a place where it can be  hard to be  open as a homosexual person. This  article presents articulations of what it is to be  homo- or  bisexual as  a teacher, based on  a discourse analysis. The  empirical material suggests  two  different  discursive  approaches  described  as   vigilance  and  resource, suggesting  different realities of  these teachers. It  is  interpreted that it is  not enough only to rely on  laws and a positive mind-set of the general public. An explicit support from colleagues is suggested to be  crucial to facilitate this group’s prerequisites to participate equally compared to norm conforming colleagues.

Emneord
homosexual teachers, heteronormativity, teachers' work, coming out
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Pedagogik och Utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-48329 (URN)10.1016/j.ijer.2015.11.005 (DOI)000369467300008 ()2-s2.0-84949575804 (Scopus ID)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2015-12-14 Laget: 2015-12-14 Sist oppdatert: 2017-12-01bibliografisk kontrollert
Lindahl, M. & Lundin, M. (2016). How do 15-16 year old students use scientific knowledge to justify their reasoning about human sexuality and relationships?. Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies, 60(November), 121-130
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>How do 15-16 year old students use scientific knowledge to justify their reasoning about human sexuality and relationships?
2016 (engelsk)Inngår i: Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies, ISSN 0742-051X, E-ISSN 1879-2480, Vol. 60, nr November, s. 121-130Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

In order to advance our understanding about the roles studentsassign to expert knowledge, the present study addresses how secondaryschool students use their knowledge of scientific disciplines in theirreasoning of socioscientific issues (SSI). Through group discussions, theresults show that students use science either as a sole justification orintegrated with other kinds of knowledge. Using expert knowledge to liftproblems out of the limited local contexts and find solutions, thestudents access the freedom to make personal choices. Thus, it wasconcluded that scientific knowledge provides possibilities for decisionsthat can support students' agency.

Emneord
agency; decision-making; reasoning skills; scientific literacy; socioscientific issues; trust
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Naturvetenskap, Naturvetenskap med utbildningsvetenskaplig inriktning
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-55800 (URN)10.1016/j.tate.2016.08.009 (DOI)000386408500012 ()2-s2.0-84983470741 (Scopus ID)
Prosjekter
Understanding the Formation of Scientific Literacy Through Socioscientific Issues: A Study of Student Discourse and Reasoning Capabilities
Forskningsfinansiär
Swedish Research Council
Tilgjengelig fra: 2016-08-27 Laget: 2016-08-27 Sist oppdatert: 2017-11-21bibliografisk kontrollert
Bossér, U., Lundin, M., Lindahl, M. & Linder, C. (2015). Challenges faced by teachers implementing socio-scientific issues as core elements in their classroom practices. European Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, 3(2), 159-176
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Challenges faced by teachers implementing socio-scientific issues as core elements in their classroom practices
2015 (engelsk)Inngår i: European Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 2301-251X, E-ISSN 2301-251X, Vol. 3, nr 2, s. 159-176Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Teachers may face considerable challenges when implementing socio‐scientific issues (SSI) in their classroom practices, such as incorporating student‐centred teaching practices and exploring knowledge and values in the context of socio-scientific issues. This year‐long study explores teachers’ reflections on the process of developing their classroom practices when implementing SSI. Video‐recorded discussions between two upper secondary school science teachers and an educational researcher, grounded in the teachers’ reflections on their classroom practices, provided data for the analysis. The results show that during the course of the implementation the teachers enhanced their awareness of the importance of promoting students’ participation and supporting their independence as learners. However, the results also suggest a conflict between the enactment of a student‐centred classroom practice and the achievement of intended learning goals. In order to accept the challenge of implementing SSI in the classroom, it is suggested that it is essential for teachers to build strategies, which integrate dialogue about learning goals.

Emneord
secondary school science, scientific literacy, socio‐scientific issues, curriculum implementation, student participation, teacher reflection
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Naturvetenskap, Naturvetenskap med utbildningsvetenskaplig inriktning
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-42913 (URN)
Forskningsfinansiär
Swedish Research Council, VR-UVK 721-2011-5534
Tilgjengelig fra: 2015-04-30 Laget: 2015-04-29 Sist oppdatert: 2017-12-19bibliografisk kontrollert
Lundin, M. (2014). En termin vid Ohio State University: Erfarenheter och reflektioner.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>En termin vid Ohio State University: Erfarenheter och reflektioner
2014 (svensk)Rapport (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
Abstract [en]

Extended abstract 

In fall 2013 I had the opportunity to stay at Ohio State University (OSU) in Columbus, thanks to STINT’s Excellence in Teaching program. In this report I present some of the things I learned there about higher education. OSU is a huge university that was founded in 1870. Here, students pay a tuition fee of $10,000 per year—more if they are not Ohio residents. OSU offers everything a student could wish for, including not only an extraordinary number of courses but also a wide array of interesting clubs, and centers. My experiences at OSU to some extent focused on the Department of Teaching and Learning but were not limited to that context. Below, I present reflections related to three aspects of campus life: the students, the teachers, and the education.

Students

The student group at OSU consists of 90% Ohio residents, but this makeup does not contradict the image of an international campus in Columbus, where many students speak a mother tongue other than English and have educational backgrounds in countries outside the United States. There are many clubs in which students can engage with one another outside their classes, and these clubs focus on specific topics and activities. The university sponsors the clubs, and I conclude that they contribute to OSU’s rich student environment. The relationship between students and teachers is usually relaxed, and I noted that teachers often explicitly expressed their expectations to students.

Teachers

A professor position at OSU (in the Department of Teaching and Learning) consists of three responsibilities: teaching, research, and service. Faculty members are expected to dedicate 40%, 40%, and 20% of their time, respectively, to these activities. Service includes administration, meetings, and various kinds of work, such as peer-review tasks and course planning. The actual distribution of time among the three responsibilities is likely closer to 40%, 30%, 30%. 

A prerequisite for becoming an associate professor and obtaining tenure is a doctoral degree. The track to tenure starts with a nonpermanent six-year appointment. After that, the evaluation for tenure takes place; it considers the candidate’s achievements in research, pedagogic competence, and service. A teacher who is not accepted for tenure may remain at OSU for one additional year after the evaluation, but not more. 

Education

Students at OSU take several courses at the same time, up to five discrete courses and these run parallel throughout the semester. This system of parallel courses allows time for reflection on the course literature and course activities. Teachers can address small parts of a text in each class session, and the relatively long time frame makes it possible to connect new discussions to ideas that were discussed earlier in the course. While many students have options regarding the choice of courses, the courses for student teachers are set depending on their initial choice(s) of specialty (e.g. subject(s) and age of students). Different paths within the teacher training consequently do not exist. 

A distinguishing feature of most courses that I experienced is the detailed style of planning and instruction. For example, the teacher provides homework for students that may consist of texts to read or a task to reflect on; students present their reflections in the following class session. I interpret this approach as involving a certain amount of study strategy, for the master’s level students as well as the undergraduates. This strategy likely bears positive implications in terms of student learning, especially for students who are less accustomed to taking responsibility for their studies. In line with such support, I noticed that many classes among those I visited in the teacher training involved some kind of practical assignment. Such an assignment or task could, for example, ask students to complete the same activity their future students would be asked to do in an actual classroom setting. In addition to an activity, students were asked to reflect upon its accomplishment. I also encountered examples in which school-like approaches were enacted in the university setting. For instance, student teachers were frequently asked about government mandated standards of learning, the rationale being that they needed to be familiar with those standards because they themselves would be evaluated as teachers in relation to how well they could achieve the goals expressed in the policy documents. As the semester progressed, the reflections on students’ assignments came to involve more and more use of theory. 

OSU provides extensive support to both teachers and students. Early in the semester, for example, teachers were offered a workshop that addressed various pedagogic topics and issues. During the semester the University Center for the Advancement of Teaching (UCAT)[1] offered consultations. These sessions comprised counseling in combination with course visits. Support is also provided as Course Design Institutes (CDIs), likewise arranged as workshops. A CDI is organized in order to promote course development. The Dennis Learning Center (DLC)[2] aims to support students by offering, for instance, courses to enhance students’ motivation or students’ study stills, but students may also receive private tutoring in their studies. Another function that facilitates students’ learning and experience is the Undergraduate Research Office, which coordinates activities for students who are interested in participating in, experiencing, and learning from research with researchers and research groups that can accommodate an undergraduate. Undergraduate research may culminate in a thesis or a poster, but its most important aspect is the experience and the exposure to research achieved through the collaboration. 

Reflections

The support that UCAT and DLC offer is impressive. Taking into account the number of students who go directly from upper secondary school to university in Sweden, I wonder how many of them would benefit from such support. Adding to this notion the facts that Swedish university courses (as I have seen them) frequently involve less direction regarding how to study and that Swedish courses often involve less homework, I suggest that equivalents of UCAT and DLC would be successful tools for promoting high-quality outcomes also in Sweden. A further method of fostering desirable outcomes can be seen in OSU’s approach to undergraduate research.

Another observation in relation to the Swedish system is the system of parallel courses found at OSU. The time students are allowed to reflect on what has been read and discussed is likely to facilitate deep learning. The environment at OSU is dynamic, characterized by students of many nationalities; I have seldom seen anything like that in Sweden. The international environment likely provides tools for development and is indeed a valuable source of competence. How could we create such an environment in a Swedish university context, and what obstacles to doing so need to be addressed?

To conclude

This report does not include any accounts of people or experiences in the city of Columbus itself, nor do I provide any suggestions to future STINT scholars. I believe that every trip abroad is unique but I would still be happy to give personalized advice to those of you who have questions.

The opportunity to live abroad for a time has opened my eyes to many things, small and large, regarding phenomena both at home and in the United States. The contrast in what is different makes things otherwise taken for granted a bit more visible. Therefore, I would like to express deep gratitude to the STINT foundation for allowing me to participate in the Excellence in Teaching program. I also extend great thanks to all the friendly, helpful, and benevolent people—friends—that I met at The Ohio State University and in Columbus.

[1] http://ucat.osu.edu/

[2] http://dennislearningcenter.osu.edu/

Publisher
s. 16
Emneord
STINT Excellence in Teaching Higher education
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Pedagogik och Utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-31372 (URN)
Merknad

Finansierad av STINT (The Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education)

Tilgjengelig fra: 2014-01-03 Laget: 2014-01-03 Sist oppdatert: 2016-01-26bibliografisk kontrollert
Lundin, M. (2014). Frågandet i klassrummet. In: Jakobson, Lundegård, Wickman (Ed.), Lärande i handling: En pragmatisk didaktik (pp. 175-185). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Frågandet i klassrummet
2014 (svensk)Inngår i: Lärande i handling: En pragmatisk didaktik / [ed] Jakobson, Lundegård, Wickman, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, s. 175-185Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
Abstract [sv]

Att ställa frågor kan ses som ett klassiskt inslag i klassrumssamtalet som fortfarande är lika aktuellt. Om vi besöker en grupp elever och deras lärare för att studera deras frågande får vi höra lärares frågor till elever men också att elever frågar sin lärare. Det här kapitlet handlar om hur frågandet i klassrum fungerar. Som lärare behöver vi vara uppmärksamma på de olika funktioner som frågor kan ha – inte minst för att de utgör ett väsentligt redskap för yrkesutövandet. De frågor som jag i detta sammanhang syftar på är ämnesrelaterade frågor, exemplifierade med samtal om naturvetenskap. Min förhoppning är emellertid att resonemangen om frågor och deras svar ska vara giltiga i fler sammanhang än naturvetenskap. I skolan förekommer förstås frågor om allt från tid för lektionsslut och provdatum, till vilken klasskamrat man ska samarbeta med. Detta kapitel avgränsas dock till de ämnesrelaterade frågorna, eftersom de kan tänkas bidra till elevers ökade förståelse av ämnet.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014
Emneord
frågor pragmatism klassrumssamtal
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Pedagogik och Utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-38619 (URN)9789144088785 (ISBN)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2014-12-16 Laget: 2014-12-16 Sist oppdatert: 2016-01-26bibliografisk kontrollert
Organisasjoner
Identifikatorer
ORCID-id: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4072-2986