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Polic, Daniela
Publikasjoner (3 av 3) Visa alla publikasjoner
Grill, A., Polic, D., Guariento, E. & Fiedler, K. (2020). Permeability of habitat edges for Ringlet butterflies (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Erebia Dalman 1816) in an alpine landscape. Nota lepidopterologica, 43, 29-41
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Permeability of habitat edges for Ringlet butterflies (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Erebia Dalman 1816) in an alpine landscape
2020 (engelsk)Inngår i: Nota lepidopterologica, ISSN 0342-7536, Vol. 43, s. 29-41Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

We tracked the movements of adult Ringlet butterflies (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Erebia Dalman, 1816) in high-elevation (> 1800 meters a. s.1.) grasslands in the Austrian Alps in order to test if an anthropogenic boundary (= an asphalt road) had a stronger effect on butterfly movement than natural habitat boundaries (trees, scree, or dwarf shrubs surrounding grassland sites). 373 individuals (136 females, 237 males) belonging to 11 Erebia species were observed in one flight season (July-August 2013) %%tile approaching or crossing habitat edges. Erebia pandrose (Borkhausen, 1788) was the most abundant species with 239 observations. All species studied were reluctant to cross habitat boundaries, but permeability was further strongly affected by the border type. Additional variables influencing movement probability were species identity and the time of the day. In E. pandrose, for which we had sufficient observations to analyse this, individuals were more likely to cross a boundary in the morning and in the late afternoon than at midday. Erebia eutyale (Esper, 1805) and E. nivalis Lorkovie & de Lesse, 1954 were more likely to leave a habitat patch than their studied congeners. The key result of our study is that the paved road had the lowest permeability among all edge types (0.1 likelihood of crossing when approaching the edge). A road cutting across a conservation area (viz. a national park) thus hinders inter-patch exchange among Ringlet butterflies in the alpine zone, even though theoretically they ought to be able to fly across.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Pensoft Publishers, 2020
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Naturvetenskap, Ekologi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-93135 (URN)10.3897/nl.43.37762 (DOI)000518785100001 ()
Tilgjengelig fra: 2020-03-26 Laget: 2020-03-26 Sist oppdatert: 2020-03-26bibliografisk kontrollert
Forsman, A., Polic, D., Sunde, J., Betzholtz, P.-E. & Franzén, M. (2020). Variable colour patterns indicate multidimensional, intraspecific trait variation and ecological generalization in moths. Ecography, 43, 1-11
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Variable colour patterns indicate multidimensional, intraspecific trait variation and ecological generalization in moths
Vise andre…
2020 (engelsk)Inngår i: Ecography, ISSN 0906-7590, E-ISSN 1600-0587, Vol. 43, s. 1-11Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Animal colour patterns long have provided information about key processes that drive the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of biological diversity. Theory and empirical evidence indicate that variation in colour patterns and other traits among individuals generally improves the performance of populations and species, for example by reducing predation risk, increasing establishment success, improving resilience to environmental change, and decreasing risk of extinction. However, little is known about whether and how variation in colour pattern among species is associated with variation in other phenotypic dimensions. To address this issue, we analysed associations of colour pattern with morphological, behavioural and life-history traits on the basis of data for nearly 400 species of noctuid moths. We found that moths with more variable colour patterns had longer flight activity periods, more diverse habitats and a greater number of host plant species than species with less variable colour patterns. Variable coloration in adult noctuid moths therefore can be considered as indicative of broader niches and generalist diets. Colour pattern variability was not significantly associated with overwintering stage or body size (wing span), and it was independent of whether the colour pattern of the larvae was non-variable, variable or highly variable. Colour pattern variation during the larval stage tended to increase as the duration of the flight activity period increased, but was independent of the length of the larval period, diet breadth and habitat use. The realization that information on colour pattern variation in adult moths, and possibly other organisms, offers a proxy for niche breadth and dietary generalization can inform management and conservation biology.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Emneord
biodiversity, ecology, evolution, generalization, macroecology, niche
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Naturvetenskap, Ekologi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-92462 (URN)10.1111/ecog.04923 (DOI)000513021700001 ()
Forskningsfinansiär
Swedish Research Council, 2018-02846
Tilgjengelig fra: 2020-03-02 Laget: 2020-03-02 Sist oppdatert: 2020-03-11
Polic, D., Fiedler, K., Nell, C. & Grill, A. (2014). Mobility of ringlet butterflies in high-elevation alpine grassland: effects of habitat barriers, resources and age. Journal of Insect Conservation, 18(6), 1153-1161
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Mobility of ringlet butterflies in high-elevation alpine grassland: effects of habitat barriers, resources and age
2014 (engelsk)Inngår i: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 18, nr 6, s. 1153-1161Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Dispersal is a crucial feature for the long-term survival of metapopulations. Each individual that leaves the habitat and enters the matrix takes a risk. Consequently, even winged organisms, like butterflies, are often extremely sedentary and spend much of their lifetime in very restricted areas. For such species, large roads may be a serious obstacle for movement. Here, we aim to study if a large and highly frequented road in an alpine environment hinders the movement of relatively sedentary butterflies of the genus Erebia. We conducted a mark-release-recapture study on six alpine Erebia species (E. eriphyleE. epiphronE. gorgeE. pharteE. pandrose and E. nivalis) in the Hohe Tauern National Park, Austria. We measured the following variables which we hypothesize to affect movement probability: (a) species identity, (b) nectar resource availability, (c) butterfly age or (d) patch isolation through the road. Population density estimates ranged from 230 ± 35 individuals for E. pharte to 1,316 ± 205 individuals for E. epiphron per hectare. More than 50 percent of recaptured butterflies were tracked within distances of <25 m. The maximum flight distance recorded was 332 m (E. epiphron). Our data indicate that species identity generally did not have a significant effect on mobility patterns in the studied Erebia butterflies. Only one species, E. pharte, was more likely to change the plot than the others. High resource availability decreased butterfly movement. Age influenced mobility, with mid-aged butterflies being most likely to move between patches. The road hindered dispersal. Butterflies which had to cross the road to get to another suitable habitat patch were less likely to move than butterflies that did not have to cross the road.

Emneord
Dispersal, Habitat fragmentation, Erebia, Alpine butterflies, Age Mark-release-recapture
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Naturvetenskap
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-65275 (URN)10.1007/s10841-014-9726-5 (DOI)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2017-06-13 Laget: 2017-06-13 Sist oppdatert: 2017-11-09bibliografisk kontrollert
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