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Lundgårdh, F., Svensson, K. & Alricsson, M. (2019). Epidemiology of hip- and groin injuries in Swedish male first football league. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Epidemiology of hip- and groin injuries in Swedish male first football league
2019 (English)In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Abstract

Purpose  This study aimed to investigate the incidence, pattern and burden of hip/groin injuries in Swedish professional male football players over five consecutive seasons.

Methods  Injury history from 16 football teams in the Swedish male first football league was evaluated during five consecutive seasons. The team’s medical staff recorded team exposure and time-loss injuries prospectively between 2012 and 2016.

Results  In total, 467 time-loss injuries located in the hip/groin area were recorded among 1,687 professional male football players, with an overall incidence and burden of 0.82/1,000 h and 15.6/1,000 h, respectively. There appeared to be an increased risk of hip/groin injuries during the last two seasons (2015-2016); however, the difference was not statistically significant (n.s). Recurrent injury rate was relatively low (14%), and overuse injuries accounted for the majority of injuries and absence days. Muscle injuries were the main injury type, while kicking and sprinting/running were the primary causes of injury. Goalkeepers had the lowest percentage of injuries and absence days.

Conclusion  Hip/groin injuries are a substantial problem in football, but does not seem to be an increasing phenomenon in the Swedish male first football league. Index and overuse injuries accounted for the majority of injuries and absence days. Thus, the focus should be on preventing hip/groin injuries to lower the injury rate. These new findings should be taken into consideration when designing and implementing preventive training interventions.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Burden, Incidence, Injury rate, Professional, Risk factors, Soccer
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81870 (URN)10.1007/s00167-019-05470-x (DOI)
Available from: 2019-04-11 Created: 2019-04-11 Last updated: 2019-04-17
Svensson, K., Eckerman, M., Alricsson, M., Magounakis, T. & Werner, S. (2018). Muscle injuries of the dominant or non-dominant leg in male football players at elite level. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 26(3), 933-937
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Muscle injuries of the dominant or non-dominant leg in male football players at elite level
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2018 (English)In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 933-937Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: The aim was to study possible differences of muscle injuries regarding type, localization and the extent of injury between the dominant and non-dominant leg in elite male football players. Another aim was to study the injury incidence of muscle injuries of the lower extremity during match and training.

METHODS: Data were consecutively collected between 2007 and 2013 in a prospective cohort study based on 54 football players from one team of the Swedish first league. The injury incidence was calculated for both match and training, injuries to the hip adductors, quadriceps, hamstrings and triceps surae were diagnosed and evaluated with ultrasonography, and their length, depth and width were measured to determine the extent of structural muscle injuries.

RESULTS: Fifty-four players suffered totally 105 of the studied muscle injuries. Out of these 105 injuries, the dominant leg was affected in 53 % (n = 56) of the cases. A significantly greater extent of the injury was found in the dominant leg when compared with the non-dominant leg with regard to structural injuries of the hamstrings. No other significant differences were found.

CONCLUSIONS: Structural hamstring muscle injuries were found to be of greater extent in the dominant leg when compared with the non-dominant leg. This new finding should be taken into consideration when allowing the football player to return to play after leg muscle injuries.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Muscle tear, Soccer, Sonography, Strain, Ultrasound
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-62291 (URN)10.1007/s00167-016-4200-4 (DOI)000426099600036 ()27338959 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-04-12 Created: 2017-04-12 Last updated: 2018-08-29Bibliographically approved
Hildingsson, M., Tranaeus Fitzgerald, U. & Alricsson, M. (2018). Perceived motivational factors for female football players during rehabilitation after sports injury: a qualitative interview study. Journal of Exercise Rehabilitation, 14(2), 199-206
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceived motivational factors for female football players during rehabilitation after sports injury: a qualitative interview study
2018 (English)In: Journal of Exercise Rehabilitation, ISSN 2288-176X, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 199-206Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Compliance with a rehabilitation program is significant among athletes following a sports injury. It is also one of the main factors that influence the rehabilitation process; moreover, the outcome is also influenced by the athlete’s motivation. It is primarily an autonomous motivation, result-ing in rehabilitation adherence. The aim of this study was to investigate the perceived motivation of female football players during rehabilitation after a sports injury and the extent to which these motivating factors were autonomous. Qualitative interviews, based on a semistructured interview guide with injured female football players undergoing rehabil-itation, were analyzed using content analysis. The motivational factors that were described were their set goals, social support as well as external and internal pressures during rehabilitation. The perceived au-tonomy varied somewhat but overall, they experienced external motiva-tion; therefore, the behavior was not entirely self-determined. Results are expected to provide a better understanding of women football play-ers’ motivation in relation to their rehabilitation; hence, physiotherapists and coaches who are part of the rehabilitation process can contribute by increasing the autonomous motivation, thus, improving the compli-ance and outcome of the rehabilitation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Korean Society of Exercise Rehabilitation, 2018
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-74012 (URN)10.12965/jer.1836030.015 (DOI)000432448100008 ()29740552 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-08 Created: 2018-05-08 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Svensson, K., Alricsson, M., Olausson, M. & Werner, S. (2018). Physical performance tests: relationship of risk factors for muscle injuries in elite level male football players. Journal of Exercise Rehabilitation, 14(2), 282-288
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical performance tests: relationship of risk factors for muscle injuries in elite level male football players
2018 (English)In: Journal of Exercise Rehabilitation, ISSN 2288-176X, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 282-288Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether there is a relationship between the outcome of preseason physical performance tests and the risk of sustaining lower extremity muscle injuries within the same season, in male football players at elite level. This is a cohort study of a male football team (63 players) from the first league in Swe-den. The football players are prospectively followed, in terms of muscle injuries of the lower extremity during five seasons between 2010 and 2014. All muscle injuries were evaluated and diagnosed with ultraso-nography. The following physical performance tests were included: squats, chin-ups, YoYo intermittent recovery level 2, counter movement jump, squat jump, standing long jump, sprint, one leg squat test, and a functional movement screen. A total of 86 muscle injuries occurred during the study period. No significant correlation was found between the results of the physical performance tests and muscle injuries of the lower extremity. None of the evaluated tests predicted the risk of sus-taining muscle injuries of the lower extremity. We conclude that muscle injury risk factors are more complex than solely related to the results of the preseason physical performance tests.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Korean Society of Exercise Rehabilitation, 2018
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-74011 (URN)10.12965/jer.1836028.014 (DOI)000432448100020 ()29740564 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports
Available from: 2018-05-08 Created: 2018-05-08 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Westin, M., Harringe, M. L., Engström, B., Alricsson, M. & Werner, S. (2018). Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury in Competitive Adolescent Alpine Skiers. The Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, 6(4), Article ID 2325967118766830.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury in Competitive Adolescent Alpine Skiers
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2018 (English)In: The Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 2325-9671, Vol. 6, no 4, article id 2325967118766830Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There is a high risk for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in alpine skiers. To reduce or try to prevent theseinjuries, intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors need to be identified.Purpose: To identify possible intrinsic and extrinsic ACL injury risk factors among competitive adolescent alpine skiers.Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3.Methods: Between 2006 and 2009, a cohort of 339 alpine ski students (176 male, 163 female) from Swedish ski high schools wereprospectively observed in terms of ACL injuries. First-time ACL injuries were recorded. In September, prior to each ski season, theskiers were clinically examined according to a specific knee protocol.Results: Overall, 11 male and 14 female skiers sustained a total of 25 first-episode ACL injuries. The majority of injuries occurred inthe left knee (P < .05). Skiers who had participated in alpine skiing for >13 years (hazard ratio, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.68-1.00; P < .05) hada reduced risk of sustaining an ACL injury. Eighteen ACL injuries occurred during training, 12 in the technical discipline of giantslalom, and 8 in slalom. Fourteen skiers reported not to be fatigued at all at the time of injury, and 8 skiers reported that they weresomewhat fatigued.Conclusion: ACL injuries occurred more often in the left knee than the right. This should be taken into consideration in the design ofACL injury prevention programs. Those who reported a higher number of active years in alpine skiing showed a reduced risk ofsustaining an ACL injury. No other factor among those studied could be identified as an independent risk factor for ACL injury.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2018
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-74007 (URN)10.1177/2325967118766830 (DOI)000432099100001 ()29780835 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-08 Created: 2018-05-08 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Sinclair, C., Svantesson, U., Sjöström, R. & Alricsson, M. (2017). Differences in Pes Planus and Pes Cavus subtalar eversion/inversion before and after prolonged running, using a two-dimensional digital analysis. Journal of Exercise Rehabilitation, 13(2), 232-239
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differences in Pes Planus and Pes Cavus subtalar eversion/inversion before and after prolonged running, using a two-dimensional digital analysis
2017 (English)In: Journal of Exercise Rehabilitation, ISSN 2288-176X, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 232-239Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In sports, there is a constant discussion about the hyper-pronation and supination of the foot during loading and its relation to injuries or discomfort. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the possible differences in the subtalar joint in the midstance phase of running, between individuals with Pes Planus and Pes Cavus, after 5 min and 45 min of running. Thirty-four subjects, meeting the requirements for Pes Planus (30 feet) and Pes Cavus (35 feet), according to the criteria for Medial Longitudinal Arch-angle, were included in the study. The calcaneal vertical angle, representing the eversion/inversion of the subtalar joint, was measured using with two-dimensional digital analysis and Dartfish Software with the subjects running barefoot on a treadmill, before and after 45 min of outside running wearing shoes. Both individuals with Pes Cavus and Pes Planus showed a significant increase in the calcaneal eversion (P<0.05) after 45 min of running. Between the groups, there was a significantly greater eversion of the Pes Planus, on the right foot, after 45 min of running (P<0.05) compared to the Pes Cavus. The effect of fatigue evident in the present study suggests that further biomechanical research should be considered when exposing the foot to the repetitive nature of running, conditions most likely responsible for the overrepresented overuse injuries among runners.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Korean Society of Exercise Rehabilitation, 2017
Keywords
Calcaneus deviation, Fatigue, Foot, Pronation, Subtalar joint, Supination
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-74233 (URN)10.12965/jer.1734902.451 (DOI)000446922200019 ()28503539 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-09 Created: 2018-05-09 Last updated: 2018-12-14Bibliographically approved
Ericsson, D., Hafsteinsson Östenberg, A., Andersson, E. & Alricsson, M. (2017). Test-retest reliability of repeated knee laxity measurements in the acute phase following a knee trauma using a Rolimeter. Journal of exercise rehabilitation, 13(5), 550-558
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Test-retest reliability of repeated knee laxity measurements in the acute phase following a knee trauma using a Rolimeter
2017 (English)In: Journal of exercise rehabilitation, ISSN 2288-176X, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 550-558Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose was to examine the test-retest reliability of the Rolimeter measurement procedure in the acute time phase, following a substantial knee trauma. In total, 15 participants with acute knee trauma were examined by one single observer at three different time-points with the Rolimeter using a maximum force. The selected time-points were: baseline (0–7 days after the trauma), midpoint (3–4 weeks after the trauma), and endpoint (3–4 weeks after the trauma). The anterior-posterior displacement was recorded where the endpoint evaluation was used as the reference value. The mean anterior laxity scores remained constant over the measurement time-points for both knees, with an anterior laxity that was 2.7 mm higher (on average) in the injured than the noninjured knee (9.5 mm vs. 6.8 mm). The mean difference (i.e., bias) between laxity scores, for the injured knee, measured at endpoint versus baseline was 0.2±1.0 mm and −0.2±1.1 mm when measured at endpoint versus midpoint, with average typical errors of 0.7 and 0.8 mm and intra-class correlations that were very strong (both r=~0.93). For the same comparisons on the noninjured knee, systematic bias was close to zero (0.1±0.3 and −0.1±0.3 mm, respectively), and both the intra-class correlations were almost perfect (r=~0.99). The current study implicates that repeated Rolimeter measurements are relatively reliable for quantifying anterior knee laxity during the acute time-phases following knee trauma. Hence, the Rolimeter, in combination with manual tests, seems to be a valuable tool for identifying anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Korean Society of Exercise Rehabilitation, 2017
Keywords
Anterior cruciate ligament, Arthrometer, Hemarthrosis, Instability, Knee joint
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-74145 (URN)10.12965/jer.1735104.552 (DOI)000446925100009 ()29114530 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-09 Created: 2018-05-09 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Ekström, A., Hafsteinsson Östenberg, A., Björklund, G. & Alricsson, M. (2017). The effects of introducing Tabata interval training and stability exercises to school children as a school-based intervention program. International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of introducing Tabata interval training and stability exercises to school children as a school-based intervention program
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background Physical activities during leisure time as well as school hours have changed over the past few years, with adolescents being less physically active and adopting a sedentary lifestyle. Objective The overall objective of this mixed-methods study was to evaluate the feasibility of introducing a 4-min Tabata interval training into a lower secondary school context. A further aim was to evaluate the possible effects on: coordination, balance, and strength. Methods The study was conducted as an intervention study with a mixed-method approach. Forty-three children, aged 7-9 years, participated in the intervention group. Additionally, 13 children were recruited as a control group. The intervention itself was delivered by the teachers and was performed for 4-min every day in a classroom setting. All participants performed physical tests before and after the intervention period to evaluate the Tabata training. After the completion of the 6-week Tabata interval training, the four teachers were interviewed. Results The push-ups (p = 0.004), kneeling push-ups (p = 0.03), and standing long jump (p = 0.01) improved in the intervention group after 6 weeks. No differences were observed between the genders. The teachers experienced that it worked well to integrate the Tabata interval training in the classroom setting. Conclusion After 6 weeks, a school-based Tabata intervention program improved physical performance. The teachers saw no obstacles in including the Tabata intervention program in a classroom setting and pointed out several positive aspects such as an increased energy level and development in the children's movement patterns.

Keywords
classroom exercise, exertion, physical activity, school exercise program
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-69098 (URN)10.1515/ijamh-2017-0043 (DOI)29168957 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-12-05 Created: 2017-12-05 Last updated: 2019-05-06
Hébert-Losier, K., Wessman, C., Alricsson, M. & Svantesson, U. (2017). Updated reliability and normative values for the standing heel-rise test in healthy adults. Physiotherapy, 103(4), 446-452
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Updated reliability and normative values for the standing heel-rise test in healthy adults
2017 (English)In: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 103, no 4, p. 446-452Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives

The heel-rise test is used to assess the strength and endurance of the plantar flexors in everyday clinical practice. However, several factors may affect outcomes, including sex, age, body mass index and activity level. The aims of this study were to revisit the reliability and normative values of this test, and establish normative equations accounting for several factors.

Design

Cross-sectional observational study with test–retest.

Setting

Community.

Participants

Volunteers (n = 566, age 20 to 81 years).

Interventions

Subjects performed single-legged heel rises to fatigue, standing on a 10° incline. A subset of subjects (n = 32) repeated the test 1 week later. Reliability was quantified using intraclass (ICC) correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman plots {mean difference [95% confidence interval (CI)]}, whereas the impact of sex, age, body mass index and activity level on the number of heel rises was determined using non-parametric regression models.

Results

The test showed excellent reliability (ICC = 0.96), with mean between-day differences in the total number of heel-rise repetitions of 0.2 (95% CI −6.2 to 6.5) and 0.1 (95% CI −6.1 to 6.2) for right and left legs, respectively. Overall, males completed more repetitions than females (median 24 vs 21). However, older females (age >60 years) outperformed older males. According to the model, younger males with higher activity levels can complete the most heel rises.

Conclusions

The heel-rise test is highly reliable. The regression models herein can be employed by clinicians to evaluate the outcomes of heel-rise tests of individuals against a comparable normative population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Lower extremity, Muscle strength, Physical examination, Regression analysis, Rehabilitation, Reproducibility of results
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-61839 (URN)10.1016/j.physio.2017.03.002 (DOI)28886865 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-03-27 Created: 2017-03-27 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Björklund, G., Alricsson, M. & Svantesson, U. (2017). Using bilateral functional and anthropometric tests to define symmetry in cross-country skiers. Journal of Human Kinetics, 60(1), 9-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using bilateral functional and anthropometric tests to define symmetry in cross-country skiers
2017 (English)In: Journal of Human Kinetics, ISSN 1640-5544, E-ISSN 1899-7562, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 9-18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to evaluate the symmetry of anthropometry and muscle function in cross-country skiers and their association to vertical jumping power. Twenty cross-country skiers were recruited (21.7 ± 3.8 yrs, 180.6 ± 7.6 cm, 73.2 ± 7.6 kg). Anthropometric data was obtained using an iDXA scan. VO2max was determined using the diagonal stride technique on a ski treadmill. Bilateral functional tests for the upper and lower body were the handgrip and standing heel-rise tests. Vertical jump height and power were assessed with a counter movement jump. Percent asymmetry was calculated using a symmetry index and four absolute symmetry index levels. At a group level the upper body was more asymmetrical with regard to lean muscle mass (p = 0.022, d = 0.17) and functional strength (p = 0.019, d = 0.51) than the lower body. At an individual level the expected frequencies for absolute symmetry level indexes showed the largest deviation from zero for the heel-rise test (χ2 = 16.97, p = 0.001), while the leg lean mass deviated the least (χ2 = 0.42, p = 0.517). No relationships were observed between absolute symmetry level indexes of the lower body and counter movement jump performance (p &gt; 0.05). As a group the skiers display a more asymmetrical upper body than lower body regarding muscle mass and strength. Interestingly at the individual level, despite symmetrical lean leg muscle mass the heel-rise test showed the largest asymmetry. This finding indicates a mismatch in muscle function for the lower body.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
De Gruyter Open, 2017
Keywords
Physical fitness, Body composition, Hand strength, Sport and Fitness Sciences, Idrottsvetenskap
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-69093 (URN)10.1515/hukin-2017-0107 (DOI)000418922200002 ()
Available from: 2017-12-05 Created: 2017-12-05 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6653-3414

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