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Publications (10 of 45) Show all publications
Jonsson Malm, C. & Petersson, B. (2019). Tillämpade, experimentella och forskningsanknutna arbetssätt i kulturarvsutbildningen. In: Katja Lindqvist (Ed.), Kompetens i museisektorn: Politik, praktik och relationen till högre utbildning (pp. 207-219). Lund: Nordic Academic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tillämpade, experimentella och forskningsanknutna arbetssätt i kulturarvsutbildningen
2019 (Swedish)In: Kompetens i museisektorn: Politik, praktik och relationen till högre utbildning / [ed] Katja Lindqvist, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2019, p. 207-219Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [sv]

Artikeln presenterar kandidatprogrammet Kulturarv i samtid och framtid vid Linnéuniversitetet och hur programmet erbjuder experimentella och forskningsanknutna arbetssätt inom ramen för utbildningen. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2019
Keywords
kulturarv, utbildning, experimentellt kulturarv, tillämpat kulturarv
National Category
Cultural Studies
Research subject
Economy, Cultural Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-82451 (URN)9789188909145 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-05-06 Created: 2019-05-06 Last updated: 2019-08-15Bibliographically approved
Huvila, I., Börjesson, L., Dell'Unto, N., Löwenborg, D., Petersson, B. & Stenborg, P. (2018). Archaeological information work and the digital turn. In: Isto Huvila (Ed.), Archaeology and archaeological information in the digital society: (pp. 143-158). Abingdon & New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Archaeological information work and the digital turn
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2018 (English)In: Archaeology and archaeological information in the digital society / [ed] Isto Huvila, Abingdon & New York: Routledge, 2018, p. 143-158Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Concluding discussion by the book authors as a group, interlinking the themes and chapters of the book Archaeology and archaeological information in the digital society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon & New York: Routledge, 2018
Keywords
archaeology, information, digitalisation
National Category
History and Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology; Humanities, Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77141 (URN)978-0-415-78843-4 (ISBN)9781315225272 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, Rambidrag 340-2012-5751
Available from: 2018-08-15 Created: 2018-08-15 Last updated: 2019-04-05Bibliographically approved
Holtorf, C. & Petersson, B. (2018). Archaeology and Time Travel. In: Claire Smith (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology: Living edition. Berlin: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Archaeology and Time Travel
2018 (English)In: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology: Living edition / [ed] Claire Smith, Berlin: Springer, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Time travel is a characteristically contemporary way of approaching the past. If reality is defined as the sum of human experiences and social practices, all reality is partly virtual, and all experienced and practiced time travel is real. In that sense, time travel experiences are not necessarily purely imaginary. Time travel experiences and associated social practices have become ubiquitous and popular, increasingly replacing more knowledge-oriented and critical approaches to the past. Our discussion covers some of the implications and problems associated with the ubiquity and popularity of time travelling including the benefits of methodical anachronism. The deliberate use of anachronism is an important method in understanding ourselves and the nature of knowledge gained about the past. We also discuss whether time travel is inherently conservative because of its escapist tendencies, or whether it might instead be considered as a fulfillment of the contemporary Experience or Dream Society. Whatever position one may take, time travel is a legitimate and timely object of study and critique because it represents a particularly significant way of bringing the past back to life in the present.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berlin: Springer, 2018
Keywords
Historical re-enactment, historical role play, living history, pastness, presence, anachronism
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77338 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-51726-1_2793-1 (DOI)978-3-319-51726-1 (ISBN)
Projects
Archaeology of Time Travel
Available from: 2018-08-26 Created: 2018-08-26 Last updated: 2018-08-27Bibliographically approved
Petersson, B. (2018). Experimentellt kulturarv: om nya vägar för att göra kulturarv betydelsefullt i vår egen tid. KULT : en ny tidskrift från Svenskt kulturarv (3), 12-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimentellt kulturarv: om nya vägar för att göra kulturarv betydelsefullt i vår egen tid
2018 (Swedish)In: KULT : en ny tidskrift från Svenskt kulturarv, ISSN 1404-4129, no 3, p. 12-13Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [sv]

Texten presenterar projektet Experimentellt Kulturarv och ett urval konstprojekt som invigdes på Öland under somrarna 2017 och 2018.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Svenskt Kulturarv, 2018
Keywords
kulturarv, konst, arkeologi, experimentellt kulturarv
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-82450 (URN)
Funder
The Kamprad Family Foundation
Note

Ej belagd 190508

Available from: 2019-05-06 Created: 2019-05-06 Last updated: 2019-05-08Bibliographically approved
Petersson, B. (2018). From storing to storytelling: Archaeological museums and digitisation. In: Isto Huvila (Ed.), Archaeology and archaeological information in the digital society: (pp. 70-105). Abingdon & New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From storing to storytelling: Archaeological museums and digitisation
2018 (English)In: Archaeology and archaeological information in the digital society / [ed] Isto Huvila, Abingdon & New York: Routledge, 2018, p. 70-105Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter takes a closer look at digitisation in archaeological museum exhibitions. Themes discussed are how contents and stories are affected when they are transformed into digital formats; if the museum experiences relying on digital techniques are built for single users or groups; if content in exhibitions are relying on digital content from excavations or if the material used is created beyond and after the excavation situation; and how archaeological information and knowledge can be discerned through communication in archaeological museums. Results are that stories definitely are affected by digitisation and that the visitors’ bodies and senses as well as minds are involved in the experience. There is still an emphasis on single user experience, even if some museums have been aware and actually created multi-user experiences but that it demands a strategy to do so in relation to technology that is often made for single users. Material used for digital display is mostly created after, and in some cases very long time after, excavations. Finally, there is a clear emphasis on storytelling in today’s museums, but it is combined with archaeological excavation results and the result of the mix of archaeology and storytelling is that the past interpreted is added an overall story that previously often was missing in archaeological object-centered display.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon & New York: Routledge, 2018
Keywords
archaeology, digitisation, museums, exhibition, communication
National Category
History and Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology; Humanities, Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-76360 (URN)978-0-415-78843-4 (ISBN)9781315225272 (ISBN)
Projects
ARKDIS: Archaeological Information in the Digital Society
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council, Rambidrag 340-2012-5751
Note

Kapitlet är författat i sin helhet av Bodil Petersson. Projektmedarbetare Carolina Larsson, Humlab vid Lunds universitet har bidragit med fotografier samt givit författaren tekniska förklaringar till hur olika tekniker som exempelvis "pepper's ghost" fungerar, så att detta har kunnat beskrivas korrekt i texten. 

The chapter as a whole is authored by Bodil Petersson. Co-worker Carolina Andersson, Humlab, Lund University, has contributed with photos and explanations of how different techniques, like "pepper's ghost" work, so that techniques are described as correct as possible in the chapter.

Available from: 2018-08-15 Created: 2018-08-15 Last updated: 2019-04-05Bibliographically approved
Petersson, B. (2017). Anachronism and Time Travel. In: Bodil Petersson, Cornelius Holtorf (Ed.), The Archaeology of Time Travel: Experiencing the Past int the 21st Century (pp. 281-297). Oxford: Archaeopress
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anachronism and Time Travel
2017 (English)In: The Archaeology of Time Travel: Experiencing the Past int the 21st Century / [ed] Bodil Petersson, Cornelius Holtorf, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2017, p. 281-297Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

It is often argued that well-prepared time travels, for example those through re-enactment and reconstruction, represent some kind of gained truth about the past. There is a striving for authenticity in detail, sometimes with a need to fill a few gaps here and there where information is missing. Anachronism on the other hand is generally banned and seen as something that should not appear at all in settings where authenticity is required. I argue, from my own experiences with research and from examples throughout this book, that the driving force behind all time travels is anachronism at its very core, and that conscious use of anachronism is an important and essential method for developing new approaches to and understanding of ourselves as well as of past societies being (re)created in the present.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Archaeopress, 2017
Keywords
anachronism, time travel, authenticity, re-enactment, method
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-64573 (URN)978 1 78491 500 1 (ISBN)978 1 78491 501 8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-05-31 Created: 2017-05-31 Last updated: 2017-06-01Bibliographically approved
Bonacchi, C. & Petersson, B. (2017). Digital Co-production in Archaeology: An editorial. Internet Archaeology (46)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital Co-production in Archaeology: An editorial
2017 (English)In: Internet Archaeology, ISSN 1363-5387, E-ISSN 1363-5387, no 46Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This special issue focuses on digitally-enabled co-production in archaeology, by bringing together papers that were presented at the session Communication as Collaboration: Digital Methods, Experiences and Values, organised at the 21st Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (University of Glasgow, 2015). The session was part of the Communicating Archaeology thematic cluster, which was partly inspired by the first published volume dedicated specifically to the topic of digital public engagement in archaeology (Bonacchi 2012). In that session and in this collection, we have been exploring communication as the collaborative construction of materials and interpretations rather than the dissemination of content at given stages of the archaeological research process (Bonacchi and Moshenska 2015). We have aimed at building an initial critical mass of literature reflecting on participatory engagement with archaeology, its values, limitations and applicability by different social actors in a range of places and spaces within geo-political, social and cultural situations. By hosting case studies that were spontaneously offered in response to an invited call for papers, the issue allows the examination of the presence, or absence, meanings and outcomes of digital co-production in archaeology at an international level.

Keywords
archaeology, digitisation, co-production, communication, collaboration
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-69359 (URN)10.11141/ia.46.1 (DOI)2-s2.0-85041614741 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-12-18 Created: 2017-12-18 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Petersson, B. & Holtorf, C. (Eds.). (2017). The Archaeology of Time Travel: Experiencing the Past in the 21st Century (1ed.). Oxford: Archaeopress
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Archaeology of Time Travel: Experiencing the Past in the 21st Century
2017 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This volume explores the relevance of time travel as a characteristic contemporary way to approach the past. If reality is defined as the sum of human experiences and social practices, all reality is partly virtual, and all experienced and practised time travel is real. In that sense, time travel experiences are not necessarily purely imaginary. Time travel experiences and associated social practices have become ubiquitous and popular, increasingly replacing more knowledge-orientated and critical approaches to the past. The papers in this book explore various types and methods of time travel and seek to prove that time travel is a legitimate and timely object of study and critique because it represents a particularly significant way to bring the past back to life in the present.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Archaeopress, 2017. p. 316 Edition: 1
Keywords
Archaeology, time travel, reconstruction, pastness, anachronism
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-64569 (URN)9781784915001 (ISBN)9781784915018 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-05-31 Created: 2017-05-31 Last updated: 2018-02-14Bibliographically approved
Holtorf, C. & Petersson, B. (2017). Time Travel to the Present: Interview with Erika Andersson Cederholm. In: Bodil Petersson, Cornelius Holtorf (Ed.), The Archaeology of Time Travel: Experiencing the Past in the 21st Century (pp. 257-270). Archaeopress
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Time Travel to the Present: Interview with Erika Andersson Cederholm
2017 (English)In: The Archaeology of Time Travel: Experiencing the Past in the 21st Century / [ed] Bodil Petersson, Cornelius Holtorf, Archaeopress, 2017, p. 257-270Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Erika Andersson Cederholm is Associate Professor in sociology at the Department of Service Management and Service Studies, Lund University. Her research interests embrace the intersection between culture, economy and social interactions, including service encounters and experiences in tourism and hospitality contexts. Her recent research focusses on the commodification and organisation of intimacy and emotions in hospitality contexts, lifestyle enterprising in the rural experience economy, and the boundary work between economic and non-economic life spheres in various service contexts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Archaeopress, 2017
Keywords
Authenticity, experience economy, experience society, lifestyle migrants, tourism
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-64603 (URN)9781784915018 (ISBN)
Projects
Archaeology of Time Travel
Available from: 2017-06-01 Created: 2017-06-01 Last updated: 2017-06-16Bibliographically approved
Petersson, B. (2017). Waterworld: Travels in Time between Past and Future Worlds (1ed.). In: Bodil Petersson, Cornelius Holtorf (Ed.), The Archaeology of Time Travel: Experiencing the Past in the 21st Century (pp. 201-212). Oxford: Archaeopress
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Waterworld: Travels in Time between Past and Future Worlds
2017 (English)In: The Archaeology of Time Travel: Experiencing the Past in the 21st Century / [ed] Bodil Petersson, Cornelius Holtorf, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2017, 1, p. 201-212Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the future-oriented action film Waterworld (1995) the world has been flooded for centuries because of melted ice caps due to environmental destruction. This film gives an opportunity to explore the materiality of both past and future worlds as the film-makers create the world anew in an explicitly material sense, with several connotations of our present that have been transformed into a distant past. On top of what aspects of a material past do they construct this future world? The text explores aspects of materiality in a fictive future setting. The conclusion is that film is a cheap way to get to other places and times. It is also an easy way for film-makers to create another universe where it is possible to invert values and intentions, to draw conclusions of our own way of life here and now and bring us to the probable future world to get us to see the consequences of our actions now. It is sometimes a laughing mirror to take the edge off the rhetoric. You can laugh at certain situations and consequences even if time travel goes to Dystopia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Archaeopress, 2017 Edition: 1
Keywords
archaeology, materiality, time travel, film, climate change
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-64574 (URN)978 1 78491 500 1 (ISBN)978 1 78491 501 8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-05-31 Created: 2017-05-31 Last updated: 2017-06-01Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9733-612X

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