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Svensson, P. AndreasORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1426-0036
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Publications (10 of 62) Show all publications
Svensson, P. A., Eghbal, R., Eriksson, R. & Nilsson, E. (2022). How cunning is the puppet-master? Cestode-infected fish appear generally fearless. Parasitology Research, 121, 1305-1315
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How cunning is the puppet-master? Cestode-infected fish appear generally fearless
2022 (English)In: Parasitology Research, ISSN 0932-0113, E-ISSN 1432-1955, Vol. 121, p. 1305-1315Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Trophically transmitted parasites have life cycles that require the infected host to be eaten by the correct type of predator.Such parasites should beneft from an ability to suppress the host’s fear of predators, but if the manipulation is imprecise theconsequence may be increased predation by non-hosts, to the detriment of the parasite. Three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) infected by the cestode Schistocephalus solidus express reduced antipredator behaviours, but it is unknownwhether this is an example of a highly precise manipulation, a more general manipulation, or if it can even be attributedto mere side efects of disease. In a series of experiments, we investigated several behaviours of infected and uninfectedsticklebacks. As expected, they had weak responses to simulated predatory attacks compared to uninfected fsh. However,our results suggest that the parasite induced a general fearlessness, rather than a precise manipulation aimed at the correctpredators (birds). Infected fsh had reduced responses also when attacked from the side and when exposed to odour from afsh predator, which is a “dead-end” for this parasite. We also tested whether the reduced anti-predator behaviours were meresymptoms of a decreased overall vigour, or due to parasite-induced hunger, but we found no support for these ideas. Wepropose that even imprecise manipulations of anti-predator behaviours may beneft parasites, for example, if other behavioursare altered in a way that increases the exposure to the correct predator.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2022
Keywords
Host-parasite interaction, Behavioural manipulation, Nutrient theft, Odour, Baltic Sea, PITT
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Ecology, Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-110903 (URN)10.1007/s00436-022-07470-2 (DOI)000770953400001 ()35307765 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85126734303 (Scopus ID)2022 (Local ID)2022 (Archive number)2022 (OAI)
Available from: 2022-03-21 Created: 2022-03-21 Last updated: 2022-10-07Bibliographically approved
Sarenbo, S. & Svensson, P. A. (2021). Bitten or struck by dog: a rising number of fatalities in Europe, 1995 – 2016. Forensic Science International, 318, 1-7, Article ID 110592.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bitten or struck by dog: a rising number of fatalities in Europe, 1995 – 2016
2021 (English)In: Forensic Science International, ISSN 0379-0738, E-ISSN 1872-6283, Vol. 318, p. 1-7, article id 110592Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We analyzed fatal dog attacks in Europe 1995-2016 using official death cause data from Eurostat. The data comprised the number of fatalities assigned The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) code W54 "bitten or struck by dog", which includes deaths due to direct attacks but which excludes many complications following dog bites, such as rabies. In 2016, dogs killed 45 Europeans, which translates to an incidence of 0.009 per 100,000 inhabitants. This is comparable to estimates from the USA (0.011), and Canada (0.007), but higher than Australia (0.004). The number of European fatalities due to dog attacks increased significantly at a rate of several percent per year. This increase could not be explained by increases in the human or the dog populations. By taking all fatalities reported 1995-2016 into account, we investigated the effects of age, gender and geography. First, children, including infants, were common victims, but also middle-aged and the elderly, while people between ages 10 and 39 were rarely killed by dogs. Second, boys and men were overrepresented, but only in certain age groups and in certain parts of Europe. Third, there were large national and regional differences, both in the effects of gender and in incidences, which ranged from 0 to 0.045 per 100,000 inhabitants. This study of dog-related fatalities at a European level is the first of its kind and forms a basis for more detailed, national studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
National Category
Law and Society Behavioral Sciences Biology
Research subject
Natural Science; Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-98845 (URN)10.1016/j.forsciint.2020.110592 (DOI)000609011200016 ()33246867 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85096864182 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-01-03 Created: 2021-01-03 Last updated: 2022-02-09Bibliographically approved
Augustsson, A., Uddh Söderberg, T., Fröberg, M., Berggren Kleja, D., Åström, M. E., Svensson, P. A. & Jarsjö, J. (2020). Failure of generic risk assessment model framework to predict groundwater pollution risk at hundreds of metal contaminated sites: Implications for research needs. Environmental Research, 185, 1-9, Article ID 109252.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Failure of generic risk assessment model framework to predict groundwater pollution risk at hundreds of metal contaminated sites: Implications for research needs
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2020 (English)In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 185, p. 1-9, article id 109252Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Soil pollution constitutes one of the major threats to public health, where spreading to groundwater is one of several critical aspects. In most internationally adopted frameworks for routine risk assessments of contaminated land, generic models and soil guideline values are cornerstones. In order to protect the groundwater at contaminated sites, a common practice worldwide today is to depart from health risk-based limit concentrations for groundwater, and use generic soil-to-groundwater spreading models to back-calculate corresponding equilibrium levels (concentration limits) in soil, which must not be exceeded at the site. This study presents an extensive survey of how actual soil and groundwater concentrations, compiled for all high-priority contaminated sites in Sweden, relate to the national model for risk management of contaminated sites, with focus on As, Cu, Pb and Zn. Results show that soil metal concentrations, as well as total amounts, constitute a poor basis for assessing groundwater contamination status. The evaluated model was essentially incapable of predicting groundwater contamination (i.e. concentrations above limit values) based on soil data, and erred on the "unsafe side" in a significant number of cases, with modelled correlations not being conservative enough. Further, the risk of groundwater contamination was almost entirely independent of industry type. In essence, since neither soil contaminant loads nor industry type is conclusive, there is a need for a supportive framework for assessing metal spreading to groundwater accounting for site-specific, geochemical conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Generic risk modelling, Contaminated sites, Groundwater pollution, Metals
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-95373 (URN)10.1016/j.envres.2020.109252 (DOI)000530034100041 ()32330755 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85083440123 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-06-03 Created: 2020-06-03 Last updated: 2023-03-30Bibliographically approved
Svensson, P. A. (2020). My house or your shelter - invasive round gobies displace native sand gobies from suitable nest substrates. In: : . Paper presented at European Goby meeting, Starnberg Germany.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>My house or your shelter - invasive round gobies displace native sand gobies from suitable nest substrates
2020 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Zoology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-98869 (URN)
Conference
European Goby meeting, Starnberg Germany
Note

Ej belagd 20201204

Available from: 2020-11-10 Created: 2020-11-10 Last updated: 2020-12-04Bibliographically approved
Tibblin, P., Hall, M., Svensson, P. A., Merilä, J. & Forsman, A. (2020). Phenotypic flexibility in background-mediated color change in sticklebacks. Behavioral Ecology, 31(4), 950-959
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phenotypic flexibility in background-mediated color change in sticklebacks
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2020 (English)In: Behavioral Ecology, ISSN 1045-2249, E-ISSN 1465-7279, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 950-959Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Phenotypic flexibility may incur a selective advantage in changing and heterogeneous environments, and is increasingly recognized as an integral aspect of organismal adaptation. Despite the widespread occurrence and potential importance of rapid and reversible background-mediated color change for predator avoidance, knowledge gaps remain regarding its adaptive value, repeatability within individuals, phenotypic correlates, and whether its expression is context dependent. We used manipulative experiments to investigate these issues in two fish species, the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) and nine-spined stickleback (Pungitius pungitius). We sequentially exposed individuals to dark and light visual background treatments, quantified color change from video recordings, and examined associations of color change with phenotypic dimensions that can influence the outcome of predator-prey interactions. G. aculeatus expressed a greater degree of color change compared to P. pungitius. In G. aculeatus, the color change response was repeatable within individuals. Moreover, the color change response was independent of body size but affected by sex and boldness, with males and bolder individuals changing less. Infection by the parasite Schistocephalus solidus did not affect the degree of color change, but it did modulate its association with sex and boldness. G. aculeatus adjusted the expression of color change in response to predation risk, with enhanced color change expression in individuals exposed to either simulated attacks, or olfactory cues from a natural predator. These results provide novel evidence on repeatability, correlated traits, and context dependence in the color change response and highlight how a suite of factors can contribute to individual variation in phenotypic flexibility.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2020
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-93452 (URN)10.1093/beheco/araa041 (DOI)000591672200015 ()32760177 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85102129717 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-04-15 Created: 2020-04-15 Last updated: 2023-02-06Bibliographically approved
Uddh Söderberg, T., Berggren Kleja, D., Åström, M. E., Jarsjö, J., Fröberg, M., Svensson, P. A. & Augustsson, A. (2019). Metal solubility and transport at a contaminated landfill site – From the source zone into the groundwater. Science of the Total Environment, 668, 1064-1076
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metal solubility and transport at a contaminated landfill site – From the source zone into the groundwater
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2019 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 668, p. 1064-1076Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Risks associated with metal contaminated sites are tightly linked to material leachability and contaminant mobility. In this study, metal solubility and transport were characterized within a glass waste landfill through i) lysimeter-collection of pore water and standardized batch leaching tests, ii) soil profiles extending from the landfill surface, through unsaturated soil underneath, and into the groundwater zone, and iii) groundwater samples upstream, at, and downstream of the landfill. The soil analyzes targeted both pseudo-total and geochemically active concentrations of contaminant metals (As, Cd, Pb, Sb) and basic soil geochemistry (pH, org. C, Fe,Mn). Water samples were analyzed for dissolved, colloid-bound and particulate metals, and speciation modelling of the aqueous phase was conducted. The results revealed a highly contaminated system, with mean metal concentrationsin the waste zone between 90 and 250 times the regional background levels. Despite severe contamination of the waste zone and high geochemically active fractions (80–100%) of all contaminant metals as well as elevated concentrations in landfill pore water, the concentrations of Cd and Pb decrease abruptly at the transition between landfill and underlying natural soil and no indication of groundwater contamination was found. The efficient cation retention is likely due to the high pH. However, the sorption of As and Sb is weaker at such high pH,which explains their higher mobility from the pore water zone into groundwater. The field soil:solution for Pb, ranging from 140 to 2,900,000 l kg−1), despite little variability in basic geochemical variables, which we suggest is due to waste material heterogeneity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Soil and groundwater metal pollution, Glass waste, Soil:Solution partitioning (Kd), Leachability, Mobility, Colloids
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81555 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.03.013 (DOI)000462776800098 ()2-s2.0-85062735396 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Geological Survey of Sweden (SGU), 36-1778/2014
Available from: 2019-04-01 Created: 2019-04-01 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Lehtonen, T. K., Svensson, P. A. & Wong, B. B. M. (2018). Aggressive desert goby males also court more, independent of the physiological demands of salinity. Scientific Reports, 8, Article ID 9352.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aggressive desert goby males also court more, independent of the physiological demands of salinity
2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 9352Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Both between- and within-individual variation in behaviour can be important in determining mating opportunities and reproductive outcomes. Such behavioural variability can be induced by environmental conditions, especially if individuals vary in their tolerance levels or resource allocation patterns. We tested the effects of exposure to different salinity levels on male investment into two important components of mating success-intrasexual aggression and intersexual courtship-in a fish with a resource defence mating system, the desert goby, Chlamydogobius eremius. We found that males that were more aggressive to rivals also exhibited higher rates of courtship displays towards females. Contrary to predictions, this positive relationship, and the consistency of the two behaviours, were not affected by the salinity treatment, despite the physiological costs that high salinity imposes on the species. Moreover, over the entire data-set, there was only a marginally non-significant tendency for males to show higher levels of aggression and courtship in low, than high, salinity. The positive correlation between male aggression and courtship, independent of the physiological demands of the environment, suggests that males are not inclined to make contrasting resource investments into these two key reproductive behaviours. Instead, in this relatively euryhaline freshwater species, typical investment into current reproductive behaviours can occur under a range of different salinity conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-76871 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-27651-3 (DOI)000435536100028 ()29921890 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85048779063 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-07-17 Created: 2018-07-17 Last updated: 2022-09-15Bibliographically approved
Svensson, P. A. (2018). Flexible background matching in colour changing sticklebacks. In: : . Paper presented at International Society of Behavioral Ecology Conference, Minneapolis, USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Flexible background matching in colour changing sticklebacks
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Ecology, Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-98870 (URN)
Conference
International Society of Behavioral Ecology Conference, Minneapolis, USA
Note

Ej belagd 20201204

Available from: 2020-11-10 Created: 2020-11-10 Last updated: 2020-12-04Bibliographically approved
Svensson, P. A. (2018). Invading the invader - eye fluke infection in a Baltic round goby population. In: : . Paper presented at European Goby Meeting, Chioggia Italy, 7 - 9 March 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Invading the invader - eye fluke infection in a Baltic round goby population
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-98872 (URN)
Conference
European Goby Meeting, Chioggia Italy, 7 - 9 March 2018
Note

Ej belagd 20201204

Available from: 2020-11-10 Created: 2020-11-10 Last updated: 2020-12-04Bibliographically approved
Flink, H., Behrens, J. W. & Svensson, P. A. (2017). Consequences of eye fluke infection on anti-predator behaviours in invasive round gobies in Kalmar Sound. Parasitology Research, 116(6), 1653-1663
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consequences of eye fluke infection on anti-predator behaviours in invasive round gobies in Kalmar Sound
2017 (English)In: Parasitology Research, ISSN 0932-0113, E-ISSN 1432-1955, Vol. 116, no 6, p. 1653-1663Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Larvae of the eye fluke, Diplostomum, emerge from snails and infect fish by penetrating skin or gills, then move to the lens where they may impair the vision of the fish. For the fluke to reproduce, a bird must eat the infected fish, and it has been suggested that they therefore actively manipulate the fish's behaviour to increase the risk of predation. We found that round gobies Neogobius melanostomus, a species that was recently introduced to the Kalmar Sound of the Baltic Sea, had an eye fluke prevalence of 90-100%. We investigated how the infection related to behavioural variation in round gobies. Our results showed that the more intense the parasite-induced cataract, the weaker the host's response was to simulated avian attack. The eye flukes did not impair other potentially important anti-predator behaviours, such as shelter use, boldness and the preference for shade. Our results are in accordance with the suggestion that parasites induce changes in host behaviour that will facilitate transfer to their final host.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Keywords
Biological invasion, Parasitism, PITT, Trematoda, Anti-predator behaviour
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-66984 (URN)10.1007/s00436-017-5439-5 (DOI)000401342300005 ()28386680 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85027865636 (Scopus ID)
Projects
EcoChange
Available from: 2017-07-20 Created: 2017-07-20 Last updated: 2019-10-21Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1426-0036

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