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Svensson, P. AndreasORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1426-0036
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Publications (10 of 54) Show all publications
Uddh Söderberg, T., Berggren Kleja, D., Åström, M. E., Jarsjö, J., Fröberg, M., Svensson, P. A. & Augustsson, A. (2019). Metal solubility and transport at a contaminated landfill site – From the source zone into the groundwater. Science of the Total Environment, 668, 1064-1076
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metal solubility and transport at a contaminated landfill site – From the source zone into the groundwater
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2019 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 668, p. 1064-1076Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Risks associated with metal contaminated sites are tightly linked to material leachability and contaminant mobility. In this study, metal solubility and transport were characterized within a glass waste landfill through i) lysimeter-collection of pore water and standardized batch leaching tests, ii) soil profiles extending from the landfill surface, through unsaturated soil underneath, and into the groundwater zone, and iii) groundwater samples upstream, at, and downstream of the landfill. The soil analyzes targeted both pseudo-total and geochemically active concentrations of contaminant metals (As, Cd, Pb, Sb) and basic soil geochemistry (pH, org. C, Fe,Mn). Water samples were analyzed for dissolved, colloid-bound and particulate metals, and speciation modelling of the aqueous phase was conducted. The results revealed a highly contaminated system, with mean metal concentrationsin the waste zone between 90 and 250 times the regional background levels. Despite severe contamination of the waste zone and high geochemically active fractions (80–100%) of all contaminant metals as well as elevated concentrations in landfill pore water, the concentrations of Cd and Pb decrease abruptly at the transition between landfill and underlying natural soil and no indication of groundwater contamination was found. The efficient cation retention is likely due to the high pH. However, the sorption of As and Sb is weaker at such high pH,which explains their higher mobility from the pore water zone into groundwater. The field soil:solution for Pb, ranging from 140 to 2,900,000 l kg−1), despite little variability in basic geochemical variables, which we suggest is due to waste material heterogeneity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Soil and groundwater metal pollution, Glass waste, Soil:Solution partitioning (Kd), Leachability, Mobility, Colloids
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81555 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.03.013 (DOI)000462776800098 ()2-s2.0-85062735396 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Geological Survey of Sweden (SGU), 36-1778/2014
Available from: 2019-04-01 Created: 2019-04-01 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Lehtonen, T. K., Svensson, P. A. & Wong, B. B. M. (2018). Aggressive desert goby males also court more, independent of the physiological demands of salinity. Scientific Reports, 8, Article ID 9352.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aggressive desert goby males also court more, independent of the physiological demands of salinity
2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 9352Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Both between- and within-individual variation in behaviour can be important in determining mating opportunities and reproductive outcomes. Such behavioural variability can be induced by environmental conditions, especially if individuals vary in their tolerance levels or resource allocation patterns. We tested the effects of exposure to different salinity levels on male investment into two important components of mating success-intrasexual aggression and intersexual courtship-in a fish with a resource defence mating system, the desert goby, Chlamydogobius eremius. We found that males that were more aggressive to rivals also exhibited higher rates of courtship displays towards females. Contrary to predictions, this positive relationship, and the consistency of the two behaviours, were not affected by the salinity treatment, despite the physiological costs that high salinity imposes on the species. Moreover, over the entire data-set, there was only a marginally non-significant tendency for males to show higher levels of aggression and courtship in low, than high, salinity. The positive correlation between male aggression and courtship, independent of the physiological demands of the environment, suggests that males are not inclined to make contrasting resource investments into these two key reproductive behaviours. Instead, in this relatively euryhaline freshwater species, typical investment into current reproductive behaviours can occur under a range of different salinity conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-76871 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-27651-3 (DOI)000435536100028 ()29921890 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85048779063 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-07-17 Created: 2018-07-17 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Flink, H., Behrens, J. W. & Svensson, P. A. (2017). Consequences of eye fluke infection on anti-predator behaviours in invasive round gobies in Kalmar Sound. Parasitology Research, 116(6), 1653-1663
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consequences of eye fluke infection on anti-predator behaviours in invasive round gobies in Kalmar Sound
2017 (English)In: Parasitology Research, ISSN 0932-0113, E-ISSN 1432-1955, Vol. 116, no 6, p. 1653-1663Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Larvae of the eye fluke, Diplostomum, emerge from snails and infect fish by penetrating skin or gills, then move to the lens where they may impair the vision of the fish. For the fluke to reproduce, a bird must eat the infected fish, and it has been suggested that they therefore actively manipulate the fish's behaviour to increase the risk of predation. We found that round gobies Neogobius melanostomus, a species that was recently introduced to the Kalmar Sound of the Baltic Sea, had an eye fluke prevalence of 90-100%. We investigated how the infection related to behavioural variation in round gobies. Our results showed that the more intense the parasite-induced cataract, the weaker the host's response was to simulated avian attack. The eye flukes did not impair other potentially important anti-predator behaviours, such as shelter use, boldness and the preference for shade. Our results are in accordance with the suggestion that parasites induce changes in host behaviour that will facilitate transfer to their final host.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Keywords
Biological invasion, Parasitism, PITT, Trematoda, Anti-predator behaviour
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-66984 (URN)10.1007/s00436-017-5439-5 (DOI)000401342300005 ()28386680 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85027865636 (Scopus ID)
Projects
EcoChange
Available from: 2017-07-20 Created: 2017-07-20 Last updated: 2019-10-21Bibliographically approved
Brüsin, M., Svensson, P. A. & Hylander, S. (2016). Individual changes in zooplankton pigmentation in relation to ultraviolet radiation and predator cues. Limnology and Oceanography, 61(4), 1337-1344
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individual changes in zooplankton pigmentation in relation to ultraviolet radiation and predator cues
2016 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, E-ISSN 1939-5590, Vol. 61, no 4, p. 1337-1344Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Copepods are common crustaceans in aquatic systems and one of the most important producers of carotenoidastaxanthin pigments, which can enhance the animals’ resistance against potentially damaging ultraviolet radiation (UVR), but at the same time, increases the risk of fish predation. Previous studies have demonstrated that copepods have different pigmentation levels matching the current threat level in terms of UVR and fish occurrence. However, these other studies have quantified population-levels changes in pigmentation, making it difficult to disentangle the role of individual phenotypic colour changes from that of selection.We quantified carotenoid-based pigmentation with colorimetric methods, which enabled us to track changes within individual copepods. Two species of copepods, Diaptomus castor and Eudiaptomus gracilis, were exposed to high and low UVR and fish cues in a factorial design. L*a*b* colour values (CIE; CommissionInternational de l’Eclairage) were extracted from digital photographs of each copepod and used as proxies for carotenoid concentration. Our results showed that individual copepods significantly changed their pigmentation in response to both UVR and fish cues within a period of 2 weeks. However, the responses differed between sexes and between adults and juveniles. UVR effects were present in all life-stages whereas fish effects were only detected in juveniles, with largest responses in D. castor. This confirms that carotenoid pigmentation is a phenotypically plastic trait, and highlights that strategies for trading off risks of UVR and predation differ between males and females as well as between life-stages.

National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-51844 (URN)10.1002/lno.10303 (DOI)000383622900014 ()2-s2.0-84969915314 (Scopus ID)
Projects
EcoChange
Available from: 2016-04-01 Created: 2016-04-01 Last updated: 2018-04-24Bibliographically approved
Lehtonen, T. K., Svensson, P. A. & Wong, B. B. M. (2016). The influence of recent social experience and physical environment on courtship and male aggression. BMC Evolutionary Biology, 16, Article ID 18.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The influence of recent social experience and physical environment on courtship and male aggression
2016 (English)In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1471-2148, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 16, article id 18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Social and environmental factors can profoundly impact an individual's investment of resources into different components of reproduction. Such allocation trade-offs are expected to be amplified under challenging environmental conditions. To test these predictions, we used a desert-dwelling fish, the desert goby, Chlamydogobius eremius, to experimentally investigate the effects of prior social experience (with either a male or a female) on male investment in courtship and aggression under physiologically benign and challenging conditions (i.e., low versus high salinity). Results: We found that males maintained a higher level of aggression towards a rival after a recent encounter with a female, compared to an encounter with a male, under low (but not high) salinity. In contrast, male investment in courtship behaviour was unaffected by either salinity or social experience. Conclusion: Together, our results suggest that male investment in aggression and courtship displays can differ in their sensitivity to environmental conditions and that not all reproductive behaviours are similarly influenced by the same environmental context.

Keywords
Aggression, Behavioural plasticity, Courtship display, Encounter rate, Environmental effect, Physiological cost, Salinity, Sexual signal, Social experience
National Category
Behavioral Sciences Biology
Research subject
Natural Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-49717 (URN)10.1186/s12862-016-0584-5 (DOI)000368387900001 ()26792425 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84955286884 (Scopus ID)
Projects
EcoChange
Available from: 2016-02-12 Created: 2016-02-12 Last updated: 2018-04-24Bibliographically approved
Flink, H. & Svensson, P. A. (2015). Nest size preferences and aggression in sand gobies (Pomatoschistus minutus). Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 69(9), 1519-1525
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nest size preferences and aggression in sand gobies (Pomatoschistus minutus)
2015 (English)In: Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, ISSN 0340-5443, E-ISSN 1432-0762, Vol. 69, no 9, p. 1519-1525Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In animal competition, resource holding potential (RHP) and resource value are two important factors determining the level of aggression and the outcome of contests. One valuable resource among nest-brooding animals that is subject to intense competition is a suitable nest substrate. Sand goby males (Pomatoschistus minutus) rely on finding good nest substrates, but the strategies vary between regions. We first investigated the nest size preferences in sand gobies from Kalmar Sound, a brackish area of the Baltic Sea with a shortage of suitable shells for nest construction and few invertebrate nest predators. Males expressed clear preference for larger nest substrates regardless of the male’s own size. To manipulate resource value, we provided males with large or small nests and tested if this and/or RHP affected aggression during nest defence. Resource value (a preferred large nest vs an unpreferred small nest) had no effect on aggression. However, RHP (total length of the resident male) had a significant effect. Larger males were more aggressive than smaller ones when matched against an opponent of the same size, suggesting that resident males acted according to own RHP.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2015
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Ecology, Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-45633 (URN)10.1007/s00265-015-1964-3 (DOI)000359639500012 ()2-s2.0-84939181256 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-08-06 Created: 2015-08-06 Last updated: 2019-10-21Bibliographically approved
Svensson, P. A., Endler, J. A. & Adcock, J. L. (2014). Experimentally induced divergence of carotenoid usage in male guppy ornaments. In: : . Paper presented at The XV Congress of the International Society for Behavioral Ecology, ISBE 2014, New York City.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimentally induced divergence of carotenoid usage in male guppy ornaments
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Females are often believed to use male ornaments as observable indicators of non-observable male traits. However, if signal form (e.g. coloration) is highly flexible, its link to signal content (e.g. quality) should be unreliable. Therefore, it is often implicitly assumed that signals are heavily constrained and relatively stable over generations. One popular illustration of costly ornaments is carotenoid-based colour signals. Recent but indirect evidence suggest that such signals may in fact evolve rapidly, but this has not been tested experimentally. We exposed large replicated populations of guppies (Poecilia reticulata; effective population sizes >1000) to three environmental conditions in a multi-generation experiment. The treatments differed in the spectral composition of ambient light by using colour filters which affected how male colours were percieved. This, in turn, was expected to lead to male coloration divergence between treatments due to female choice. In addition, the filters affected the micro-flora and -fauna, which are dietary sources of ornamental pigments. Male skin carotenoids were analysed after 3 and 5 generations. In this short time, populations had diverged in male coloration and in the carotenoid composition of sexual ornaments. A second experiment disentangled environmental and genetic effects. Our study demonstrates evolutionary innovation in signal traits, and how dietary-driven responses to environmental change can impact sexual ornaments.

National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Natural Science, Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-41276 (URN)
Conference
The XV Congress of the International Society for Behavioral Ecology, ISBE 2014, New York City
Note

Ej belagd 20151202

Available from: 2015-03-23 Created: 2015-03-23 Last updated: 2016-05-03Bibliographically approved
Svensson, P. A., Endler, J. A. & Adcock, J. L. (2014). Experimentally induced divergence of carotenoid usage in male guppy ornaments. In: : . Paper presented at 6th Conference for Poeciliid Biologists, Exeter, U.K., 2nd-5th Sept, 2014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimentally induced divergence of carotenoid usage in male guppy ornaments
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Females are often believed to use male ornaments as observable indicators of non-observable male traits. However, if signal form (e.g. coloration) is highly flexible, its link to signal content (e.g. quality) should be unreliable. Therefore, it is often implicitly assumed that signals are heavily constrained and relatively stable over generations. One popular illustration of costly ornaments is carotenoid-based colour signals. Recent but indirect evidence suggest that such signals may in fact evolve rapidly, but this has not been tested experimentally. We exposed large replicated populations of guppies (Poecilia reticulata; effective population sizes >1000) to three environmental conditions in a multi-generation experiment. The treatments differed in the spectral composition of ambient light by using colour filters which affected how male colours were percieved. This, in turn, was expected to lead to male coloration divergence between treatments due to female choice. In addition, the filters affected the micro-flora and -fauna, which are dietary sources of ornamental pigments. Male skin carotenoids were analysed after 3 and 5 generations. In this short time, populations had diverged in male coloration and in the carotenoid composition of sexual ornaments. A second experiment disentangled environmental and genetic effects. Our study demonstrates evolutionary innovation in signal traits, and how dietary-driven responses to environmental change can impact sexual ornaments.

National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Ecology, Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-41278 (URN)
Conference
6th Conference for Poeciliid Biologists, Exeter, U.K., 2nd-5th Sept, 2014
Available from: 2015-03-23 Created: 2015-03-23 Last updated: 2016-12-08Bibliographically approved
Svensson, P. A. (2013). A new goby research lab in the central Baltic Proper. In: : . Paper presented at 5th Nordic Goby Meeting, Tübingen, Germany, March 6-9, 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A new goby research lab in the central Baltic Proper
2013 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Natural Science, Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-41282 (URN)
Conference
5th Nordic Goby Meeting, Tübingen, Germany, March 6-9, 2013
Available from: 2015-03-23 Created: 2015-03-23 Last updated: 2016-05-03Bibliographically approved
van Lieshout, E., Svensson, P. A. & Wong, B. (2013). Consequences of paternal care on pectoral fin allometry in a desert-dwelling fish. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 67(3), 513-518
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consequences of paternal care on pectoral fin allometry in a desert-dwelling fish
2013 (English)In: Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, ISSN 0340-5443, E-ISSN 1432-0762, Vol. 67, no 3, p. 513-518Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Positive static allometry is a scaling relationship where the relative size of traits covaries with adult body size. Traditionally, positive allometry is thought to result from either altered physiological requirements at larger body size or from strongly condition-dependent allocation under sexual selection. Yet, there are no theoretical reasons why positive allometry cannot evolve in fitness-related traits that are solely under the influence of natural selection. We investigated scaling and sexual dimorphism of a naturally selected trait, pectoral fin size, in comparison to a trait important in male–male combat, head width in natural populations of a fish, the desert goby Chlamydogobius eremius. Male desert gobies provide uniparental care and use their pectoral fins to fan the brood (often under hypoxic conditions); hence, larger fins are expected to be more efficient. Male pectoral fins do not appear to fulfil a signalling function in this species. We found that, for both pectoral fin size and head width, males exhibited positive allometric slopes and greater relative trait size (allometric elevation) than females. However, for head width, females also showed positive allometry, albeit to a lesser degree than males. Because fin locomotory function typically does not result in positive allometry, our findings indicate that other naturally selected uses, such as paternal care, can exaggerate trait scaling relationships.

National Category
Evolutionary Biology Zoology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology; Ecology, Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-18795 (URN)10.1007/s00265-012-1470-9 (DOI)000314892700016 ()2-s2.0-84873989260 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-05-22 Created: 2012-05-22 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1426-0036

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