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Lundvall, M., Lindberg, E., Hörberg, U., Palmér, L. & Carlsson, G. (2019). Healthcare professionals' lived experiences of conversations with young adults expressing existential concerns. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 33(1), 136-143
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Healthcare professionals' lived experiences of conversations with young adults expressing existential concerns
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2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 136-143Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: This paper describes first-line department healthcare professionals’ experiences of conversations with young adults (16–25 years) who express existential concerns. Existential concerns encompass questions about the meaning of life and the choices people must make, and they are sometimes expressed during the period in which a child is becoming an adult. Sometimes the transition to adulthood can be difficult, and many young adults seek support from people in first-line departments, such as primary care providers, youth guidance centre personnel and student health service employees in high schools and universities. Conversations in which existential concerns are recognised may be important for preventing mental illness in the future.

Aim: The study aimed to describe healthcare professionals’ lived experiences of conversations with young adults who express existential concerns.

Approach and methods: This qualitative study utilises thematic meaning analysis. Interviews were conducted with healthcare professionals working in first-line departments, and data were analysed based on the principles of reflective lifeworld research. The study followed ethical codes of conduct and conformed to the ethical guidelines adopted by the Swedish Research Council.

Findings: The results are presented in three themes of meaning: searching for innermost thoughts requires being present, uncertainty about the unpredictable and awakening of one’s own existential concerns.

Conclusions and implications: Healthcare professionals are affected when young adults express their existential concerns, and they need more support to strengthen their ability to stay present and create inviting atmospheres.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
caring, caring science, conversations, existence, existential, healthcare professionals, lifeworld, reflective lifeworld research, thematic meaning analysis.
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77461 (URN)10.1111/scs.12612 (DOI)000462154100014 ()30152541 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85053204338 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-30 Created: 2018-08-30 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Lundvall, M., Lindberg, E., Hörberg, U., Carlsson, G. & Palmér, L. (2019). Lost in an unknown terrain: a phenomenological contribution to the understanding of existential concerns as experienced by young women in Sweden. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 14(1), 1-11, Article ID 1658843.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lost in an unknown terrain: a phenomenological contribution to the understanding of existential concerns as experienced by young women in Sweden
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 1-11, article id 1658843Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The aim of this study is to describe young women’s (16–25 years old) experiences of living with existential concerns for which they have sought support from healthcare professionals, teachers, family, or friends, among others.

Methods: This phenomenological study is based on a reflective lifeworld research (RLR) approach. Nine young women were interviewed about their experience of living with existential concerns.

Results: The results show the essential meaning of the phenomenon of “existential concerns” that can be described as living a life that is marked in a profound way by a feeling of being lost in an unknown terrain. To further understand the essential meaning, four constituents are described: the unpredictable body, longing for comprehension, playing a game, and longing to share one’s vulnerability.

Conclusions: Young women with existential concerns are vulnerable, as they are profoundly influenced by these concerns. They have to navigate through daily life while trying to fit in and to make their situation comprehensible. These young women have a longing to share their existential concerns with a trustworthy person, while at the same time they fear revealing their existential concerns and risking being rejected by others. A lifeworld-led, caring science approach, intertwined with the results of the present study, has the potential to direct caring practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Keywords
Caring science, Existential concerns, Mental health, Phenomenology, Reflective lifeworld research, Young women
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-88751 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2019.1658843 (DOI)000482928300001 ()31451104 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-27 Created: 2019-08-27 Last updated: 2019-09-24Bibliographically approved
Lindberg, E. & Hörberg, U. (2019). Metodprinciper för generell struktur och filosofisk belysning på livsvärldsteoretisk grund. In: Helena Dahlberg, Sidsel Ellingsen, Bente Martinsen & Susanne Rosberg (Ed.), Fenomenologi i praktiken: fenomenologisk forskning i ett skandinaviskt perspektiv (pp. 269-283). Stockholm: Liber
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metodprinciper för generell struktur och filosofisk belysning på livsvärldsteoretisk grund
2019 (Swedish)In: Fenomenologi i praktiken: fenomenologisk forskning i ett skandinaviskt perspektiv / [ed] Helena Dahlberg, Sidsel Ellingsen, Bente Martinsen & Susanne Rosberg, Stockholm: Liber, 2019, p. 269-283Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Liber, 2019
National Category
Philosophy
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-84533 (URN)9789147113453 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-06-03 Created: 2019-06-03 Last updated: 2019-09-18Bibliographically approved
Albinsson, G., Elmqvist, C. & Hörberg, U. (2019). Nursing students’ and lecturers’ experiences of learning at a university-based nursing student–run health clinic. Reflective Practice, 20(4), 423-436
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nursing students’ and lecturers’ experiences of learning at a university-based nursing student–run health clinic
2019 (English)In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 423-436Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article aims to describe the phenomenon of learning at a university-based nursing student–run health clinic, as experienced by student nurses and lecturers. The study is based on a reflective lifeworld research approach founded on continental philosophy. Eight group interviews were conducted with 38 student nurses and 5 lecturers. The data were explored and analysed for meaning. The results show that learning is supported by a permissive learning environment that builds on both individual and common learning as well as equal relationships within the student group, in relation to the visitors at the health clinic and, to a certain extent, in relation to the lecturers. The most significant finding is that reflective, development-oriented learning takes place when the students, supported by each other and their lecturers, reflect on how to relate to problems and situations. A situation-based learning approach is thus shown to create the prerequisites for lecturers being nearby, reflective dialogue partners but also supervisors in situations where the students ask for support and guidance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Nursing students, Lecturers, Lifeworld-led learning, Health clinic, Health support, Refective talks, Intertwining of theory and practice
National Category
Nursing Educational Sciences
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-86635 (URN)10.1080/14623943.2019.1638242 (DOI)000475073200001 ()
Available from: 2019-07-11 Created: 2019-07-11 Last updated: 2019-09-23Bibliographically approved
Hörberg, U., Galvin, K., Ekebergh, M. & Ozolins, L.-L. (2019). Using lifeworld philosophy in education to intertwine caring and learning: an illustration of ways of learning how to care. Reflective Practice, 20(1), 56-69
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using lifeworld philosophy in education to intertwine caring and learning: an illustration of ways of learning how to care
2019 (English)In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 56-69Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Our general purpose is to show how a philosophically oriented theoretical foundation, drawn from a lifeworld perspective can serve as a coherent direction for caring practices in education. We argue that both caring and learning share the same ontological foundation and point to this intertwining from a philosophical perspective. We proceed by illustrating shared epistemological ground through some novel educational practices in the professional preparation of carers. Beginning in a phenomenologically oriented philosophical foundation, we will first unfold what this means in the practice of caring, and secondly what it means for education and learning to care in humanly sensitive ways. We then share some ways that may be valuable in supporting learning and health that provides a basis for an existential understanding. We argue that existential understanding may offer a way to bridge the categorisations in contemporary health care that flow from problematic dualisms such as mind and body, illness and well-being, theory and practice, caring and learning. Ways of overcoming such dualistic splits and new existential understandings are needed to pave the way for a care that is up to the task of responding to both human possibilities and vulnerabilities, within the complexity of existence. As such, we argue that caring and learning are to be understood as an intertwined phenomenon of pivotal importance in education of both sensible and sensitive carers. Lifeworld led didactics and reflection, which are seen as the core of learning, constitute an important educational strategy here.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Care, Education, Embodied knowledge, Lifeworld philosophy, Learning
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-79349 (URN)10.1080/14623943.2018.1539664 (DOI)000458803000005 ()2-s2.0-85059695821 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-03 Created: 2019-01-03 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Strömwall, A., Ozolins, L.-L. & Hörberg, U. (2018). “Seeing the patient as a human is their priority”: patients’ experiences of being cared for by pairs of student nurses. Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, 8(7), 97-105
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Seeing the patient as a human is their priority”: patients’ experiences of being cared for by pairs of student nurses
2018 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 8, no 7, p. 97-105Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A Developing and Learning Care Unit (DLCU) is a model used in the clinical practice of student nurses that aims at bridging the gap between theory and praxis, by supporting nursing students’ learning through supervision in pairs. The aim of this study is to describe how patients experience being cared for by pairs of student nurses. 

Methods: The study is based on a reflective lifeworld research (RLR) approach founded on phenomenological traditions. Data was collected in lifeworld interviews of 17 patients cared for by pairs of student nurses. The data was explored and analysed for meaning.

Results: To be cared for by student nurses, supervised in pairs entails being involved in the students’ learning and being met with responsibility and a willingness to care and learn. This means being made the centre of attention, being seen, taken seriously and being listened to as a valuable human being. The students’ care is shown to be more flexible and has a more open approach, in comparison to that of the ordinary staff, and they ‘do something extraordinary’ and give of their time.

Conclusions: Pairs of students, who are supervised within a learning model that support students’ learning through reflection, can contribute to patient experiences of being given good care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sciedu Press, 2018
Keywords
Clinical practice, Developing and Learning Care Unit, Nursing students, Patient perspective, Reflective lifeworld research
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-71528 (URN)10.5430/jnep.v8n7p97 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-03-15 Created: 2018-03-15 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
Hörberg, U. (2018). 'The art of understanding in forensic psychiatric care': from a caring science perspective based on a lifeworld approach. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 39(9), 802-809
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'The art of understanding in forensic psychiatric care': from a caring science perspective based on a lifeworld approach
2018 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 39, no 9, p. 802-809Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Patients in forensic psychiatric clinics are a vulnerable and exposed patient group due to suffering from a severe mental disorder, having committed a crime and being cared for against their will in an institutional environment with a high level of security. The art of understanding in forensic psychiatric care is discussed from a caring science perspective, based on a lifeworld approach. The aim is to contribute knowledge that can support staff, who daily meet patients on forensic psychiatric wards, in applying a caring attitude.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
caring attitude, caring science, forensic psychiatric care, lifeworld approach, understanding
National Category
Psychiatry Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-75615 (URN)10.1080/01612840.2018.1496499 (DOI)000459680300011 ()30273078 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054355499 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-12 Created: 2018-06-12 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Örmon, K. & Hörberg, U. (2017). Abused women’s vulnerability in daily life and in contact with psychiatric care: in the light of a caring science perspective. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 26(15-16), 2384-2391
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Abused women’s vulnerability in daily life and in contact with psychiatric care: in the light of a caring science perspective
2017 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 15-16, p. 2384-2391Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objectives

The aim of the study is to deepen the understanding of abused women's vulnerability in relation to how the abuse and encounters with health care professionals affect life. A further aim is to highlight abused women's vulnerability with a caring science perspective.

Background

Experience of abuse has consequences for the mental health of women and girls. Abused women may experience health care as unsupportive, and as a result, often chose not to disclose their experiences of abuse.

Design and methods

The results of two qualitative empirical studies were analysed along with a phenomenological meaning analysis in accordance with the methodological principles of Reflective Lifeworld Research.

Findings

Living one's life with experiences of abuse implies vulnerability, which can prevent abused women from achieving good health. This vulnerability results from insecurity regarding identity, along with the sense that one could have been a different individual if it were not for the abuse and thereby have a more fair chance in life. Being cared for within general psychiatric care could further increase this vulnerability. The healthcare professional's ability to care for the women who have experienced abuse leads to either an encounter of trust or else further suffering for the women.

Conclusion

A lifeworld-oriented caring science perspective as a foundation for care can contribute to care for abused women which reaches the existential dimensions of their vulnerability and vulnerable life situation.

Relevance to clinical practice

It is evident that healthcare professionals should deepen their understanding of how abused women live, within a general psychiatric context. This study enables a deeper understanding of abused women's vulnerability in relation to how the abuse and encounters with healthcare professionals affect life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
Abused women, Caring science, General psychiatric care, Mmental health, Reflective Lifeworld Research
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-54374 (URN)10.1111/jocn.13306 (DOI)000405562600024 ()27349375 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84978716230 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-06-29 Created: 2016-06-29 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Hörberg, U. (2017). Betydelsen av förståelse i vårdande inom rättspsykiatrisk vård (1ed.). In: Karin Dahlberg & Inger Ekman (Ed.), Vägen till patientens värld och personcentrerad vård: att bli lyssnad på och förstådd (pp. 271-289). Stockholm: Liber
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Betydelsen av förståelse i vårdande inom rättspsykiatrisk vård
2017 (Swedish)In: Vägen till patientens värld och personcentrerad vård: att bli lyssnad på och förstådd / [ed] Karin Dahlberg & Inger Ekman, Stockholm: Liber, 2017, 1, p. 271-289Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Liber, 2017 Edition: 1
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-66082 (URN)9789147112715 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-07-03 Created: 2017-07-03 Last updated: 2017-08-29Bibliographically approved
Hörberg, U. & Ozolins, L.-L. (2017). Do you understand me?: how music and singing can create a meaningful space of importance to express and understand wellbeing and suffering. In: European Academy of Caring Sciences in collaboration with Nordic College of Caring Science: “Wellbeing and caring in changing times”, Nord University, Bodø, Norway, 20–21 April 2017: book of abstracts. Paper presented at European Academy of Caring Sciences in collaboration with Nordic College of Caring Science: “Wellbeing and caring in changing times”, Nord University, Bodø, Norway, April 20–21, 2017 (pp. 22-22).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do you understand me?: how music and singing can create a meaningful space of importance to express and understand wellbeing and suffering
2017 (English)In: European Academy of Caring Sciences in collaboration with Nordic College of Caring Science: “Wellbeing and caring in changing times”, Nord University, Bodø, Norway, 20–21 April 2017: book of abstracts, 2017, p. 22-22Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Wellbeing has many forms and can be expressed in many different ways. Earlier research has shown that using films in nursing education can support the learning of caring science, and bring a touching context for the students that can be related to nursing practice. This presentation focus on how wellbeing and suffering are expressed in the film Once by John Camey and how this can be understood in relation to caring and the support of health processes. In addition, it is of importance to educate both sensible and sensitive nurses, and we suggest that different kinds of learning strategies such as using films that touch upon existential aspects. By relating the film to the students' experiences, caring science concepts and philosophy, the understanding of human existence can be expanded and deepened. In this particular presentation we use the philosophy of Merleau-Ponty to clarify how intersubjectivity points both to the individuality and individual expression, and at the same time to the in-between and co-existence through music and singing together. Vignettes from the film are analysed in order to provide a deepened understanding of how music and singing can contribute to wellbeing and health processes.

Keywords
Caring, Education, Film, Merleau-Ponty, Suffering, Wellbeing
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-69407 (URN)
Conference
European Academy of Caring Sciences in collaboration with Nordic College of Caring Science: “Wellbeing and caring in changing times”, Nord University, Bodø, Norway, April 20–21, 2017
Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8115-5359

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