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Holtorf, C. & Högberg, A. (2018). Archaeology and the Future. In: Claire Smith (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology: Living Edition. Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Archaeology and the Future
2018 (English)In: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology: Living Edition / [ed] Claire Smith, Cham: Springer, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The future has seldom been an object of archaeological study even though there are some very profound and deep-reaching links between past, present, and future. At the same time, archaeologists work to preserve places, environments, and associated values and knowledge for future generations. But although it is not far-fetched to claim that the future will differ from what we are used to in the present, in managing archaeological heritage, most assumptions about the future do not build on an understanding of how the future will be different from today. We argue in this paper that archaeologists should not only promote historical consciousness but also future consciousness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2018
Keywords
Heritage Futures, cultural heritage theory, critical heritage studies, future studies
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77069 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-51726-1_2792-1 (DOI)978-3-319-51726-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-08-07 Created: 2018-08-07 Last updated: 2018-08-08Bibliographically approved
Holtorf, C. & Petersson, B. (2018). Archaeology and Time Travel. In: Claire Smith (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology: Living edition. Berlin: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Archaeology and Time Travel
2018 (English)In: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology: Living edition / [ed] Claire Smith, Berlin: Springer, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Time travel is a characteristically contemporary way of approaching the past. If reality is defined as the sum of human experiences and social practices, all reality is partly virtual, and all experienced and practiced time travel is real. In that sense, time travel experiences are not necessarily purely imaginary. Time travel experiences and associated social practices have become ubiquitous and popular, increasingly replacing more knowledge-oriented and critical approaches to the past. Our discussion covers some of the implications and problems associated with the ubiquity and popularity of time travelling including the benefits of methodical anachronism. The deliberate use of anachronism is an important method in understanding ourselves and the nature of knowledge gained about the past. We also discuss whether time travel is inherently conservative because of its escapist tendencies, or whether it might instead be considered as a fulfillment of the contemporary Experience or Dream Society. Whatever position one may take, time travel is a legitimate and timely object of study and critique because it represents a particularly significant way of bringing the past back to life in the present.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berlin: Springer, 2018
Keywords
Historical re-enactment, historical role play, living history, pastness, presence, anachronism
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77338 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-51726-1_2793-1 (DOI)978-3-319-51726-1 (ISBN)
Projects
Archaeology of Time Travel
Available from: 2018-08-26 Created: 2018-08-26 Last updated: 2018-08-27Bibliographically approved
Holtorf, C. (2018). Authenticity and Pastness in Cultural Heritage Management. In: Claire Smith (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology: Living edition. Berlin: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Authenticity and Pastness in Cultural Heritage Management
2018 (English)In: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology: Living edition / [ed] Claire Smith, Berlin: Springer, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Authenticity is about what you can trust to be what it purports to be, and cultural heritage is about what evokes the past in a given social con- text. Consequently, authentic cultural heritage is about what you can trust and evokes the past in society. This quality is often assessed by various ways of determining the age of the heritage in question. But dating does not sufficiently take into account the perceptions of the audience. For something to evoke the past in a given social context, it does not have to be old. Instead of focusing on age, we must therefore focus on the perceived quality of being of the past, as it is the presence or absence of this perception that deter- mines whether or not something is trusted to evoke the past in society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berlin: Springer, 2018
Keywords
Authenticity, pastness, Alois Riegl
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77193 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-51726-1_1138-2 (DOI)978-3-319-51726-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-08-19 Created: 2018-08-19 Last updated: 2018-08-21Bibliographically approved
Holtorf, C. (2018). During the 2018 European Year of Cultural Heritage, the heritage sector has much to learn from nuclear waste. The European Archaeologist : Newsletter of the European Association of Archaeologists., 55, 10-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>During the 2018 European Year of Cultural Heritage, the heritage sector has much to learn from nuclear waste
2018 (English)In: The European Archaeologist : Newsletter of the European Association of Archaeologists., ISSN 1022–0135, Vol. 55, p. 10-11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [en]

2018 is the European Year of Cultural Heritage. This “unprecedented year of events and celebrations” was put under the motto Our Heritage: Where The Past Meets The Future. But the heritage sector is rather badly prepared for the future and its challenges.

Keywords
European Year of Cultural Heritage, Heritage Futures, Nuclear Culture, Nuclear Humanities
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-70664 (URN)
Projects
Heritage Futures
Available from: 2018-02-10 Created: 2018-02-10 Last updated: 2018-02-13Bibliographically approved
Holtorf, C. (2018). Heritage: Public Perceptions. In: Claire Smith (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology: Living edition. Berlin: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heritage: Public Perceptions
2018 (English)In: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology: Living edition / [ed] Claire Smith, Berlin: Springer, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the public domain, heritage is perceived and widely appreciated in relation to stories which people tell about themselves.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berlin: Springer, 2018
Keywords
Cultural heritage, heritage values, critical heritage studies
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77194 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-51726-1_1133-2 (DOI)978-3-319-51726-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-08-19 Created: 2018-08-19 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Holtorf, C. (2018). Homeless heritage. Collaborative social archaeology as therapeutic practice: Rachel Kiddey, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2017, 288 pp., $85 (hardcover), ISBN 9780198746867 [Review]. Heritage & Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Homeless heritage. Collaborative social archaeology as therapeutic practice: Rachel Kiddey, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2017, 288 pp., $85 (hardcover), ISBN 9780198746867
2018 (English)In: Heritage & Society, ISSN 2159-032X, E-ISSN 2159-0338Article, book review (Other academic) Epub ahead of print
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-73731 (URN)10.1080/2159032X.2018.1465151 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-04-27 Created: 2018-04-27 Last updated: 2018-06-19
Holtorf, C. & Högberg, A. (2018). Kulturarvssektorn är dåligt förberedd för framtiden. Respons : recensionstidskrift för humaniora & samhällsvetenskap (4), 7-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kulturarvssektorn är dåligt förberedd för framtiden
2018 (Swedish)In: Respons : recensionstidskrift för humaniora & samhällsvetenskap, ISSN 2001-2292, no 4, p. 7-8Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
History and Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77466 (URN)
Available from: 2018-08-30 Created: 2018-08-30 Last updated: 2018-09-14Bibliographically approved
Holtorf, C. (2018). Preservation Paradigm in Heritage Management. In: Claire Smith (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology: Living Edition. Berlin: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preservation Paradigm in Heritage Management
2018 (English)In: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology: Living Edition / [ed] Claire Smith, Berlin: Springer, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The idea of preservation is the basic paradigm of all heritage management, including archaeological heritage management. Heritage experts often take for granted that remains of the past are inherently valuable and deserve to be maintained in perpetuity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berlin: Springer, 2018
Keywords
heritage preservation, heritage conservation
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77337 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-51726-1_1080-2 (DOI)978-3-319-51726-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-08-26 Created: 2018-08-26 Last updated: 2018-08-27Bibliographically approved
Holtorf, C. (2017). Advantages and Disadvantages of Indigenous Archaeologies: A comment on Schaepe et al, Archaeology as Therapy : Connecting Belongings, Knowledge, Time, Place, and Well-Being. University of Chicago Press, 58(4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Advantages and Disadvantages of Indigenous Archaeologies: A comment on Schaepe et al, Archaeology as Therapy : Connecting Belongings, Knowledge, Time, Place, and Well-Being
2017 (English)Other (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In applied form, archaeology has the potential to transform society. Schaepe, Angelbeck, Snook, and Welch discuss one way in which this potential can be fulfilled in practice, as therapy in the service of indigenous communities. 

Place, publisher, year, pages
University of Chicago Press, 2017. p. 2
Series
Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382 ; vol 58, no 4
Keywords
Indigenous archaeologies, applied archaeology, uses of archaeology, public archaeology
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-67077 (URN)
Note

A comment on the article Archaeology as Therapy : Connecting Belongings, Knowledge, Time, Place, and Well-Being by Schaepe et al.

Available from: 2017-07-23 Created: 2017-07-23 Last updated: 2018-05-07Bibliographically approved
Holtorf, C., Högberg, A. & Lindskog, D. (2017). Arch Out Loud: Designing a Surface Marker for a Geological Repository of Nuclear Waste for the Benefit of Our Children. Heritage Futures
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Arch Out Loud: Designing a Surface Marker for a Geological Repository of Nuclear Waste for the Benefit of Our Children
2017 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) [Artistic work]
Place, publisher, year, pages
Heritage Futures, 2017
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-69418 (URN)
Projects
Heritage Futures
Note

In October 2017, a group of researchers in archaeology at Linnaeus University submitted an entry into the arch out loud competition for designing a Nuclear Landmarker at the site of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico.

Available from: 2017-12-20 Created: 2017-12-20 Last updated: 2018-01-18Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0557-9651

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