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Polic, D., Yildirim, Y., Merilaita, S., Franzén, M. & Forsman, A. (2024). Genetic structure, UV-vision, wing coloration and size coincide with colour polymorphism in Fabriciana adippe butterflies. Molecular Ecology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic structure, UV-vision, wing coloration and size coincide with colour polymorphism in Fabriciana adippe butterflies
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2024 (English)In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Colour polymorphisms have long served as model systems in evolutionary studies and continue to inform about processes involved in the origin and dynamics of biodiversity. Modern sequencing tools allow for evaluating whether phenotypic differences between morphs reflect genetic differentiation rather than developmental plasticity, and for investigating whether polymorphisms represent intermediate stages of diversification towards speciation. We investigated phenotypic and genetic differentiation between two colour morphs of the butterfly Fabriciana adippe using a combination of ddRAD-sequencing and comparisons of body size, colour patterns and optical properties of bright wing spots. The silvery-spotted adippe form had larger and darker wings and reflected UV light, while the yellow cleodoxa form displayed more green scales and reflected very little UV, showcasing that they constitute distinct and alternative integrated phenotypes. Genomic analyses revealed genetic structuring according to source population, and to colour morph, suggesting that the phenotypic differentiation reflects evolutionary modifications. We report 17 outlier loci associated with colour morph, including ultraviolet-sensitive visual pigment (UVRh1), which is associated with intraspecific communication and mate choice in butterflies. Together with the demonstration that the wings of the adippe (but essentially not the cleodoxa) morph reflect UV light, that UV reflectance is higher in females than males and that morphs differ in wing size, this suggests that these colour morphs might represent genetically integrated phenotypes, possibly adapted to different microhabitats. We propose that non-random mating might contribute to the differentiation and maintenance of the polymorphism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
alternative integrated phenotypes, assortative mating, colour polymorphism, ddRAD-sequencing, evolution, genetic correlation
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Ecology, Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-127565 (URN)10.1111/mec.17272 (DOI)001145460500001 ()38240162 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85182706201 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-02-09 Created: 2024-02-09 Last updated: 2024-02-09
Franzén, M., Forsman, A. & Karimi, B. (2023). Anthropogenic Influence on Moth Populations: A Comparative Study in Southern Sweden. Insects, 14(8), Article ID 702.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anthropogenic Influence on Moth Populations: A Comparative Study in Southern Sweden
2023 (English)In: Insects, ISSN 2075-4450, E-ISSN 2075-4450, Vol. 14, no 8, article id 702Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As moths are vital components of ecosystems and serve as important bioindicators, understanding the dynamics of their communities and the factors influencing these dynamics, such as anthropogenic impacts, is crucial to understand the ecological processes. Our study focuses on two provinces in southern Sweden, V & auml;sterg & ouml;tland and Sm & aring;land, where we used province records from 1974 to 2019 in combination with light traps (in 2020) to record the presence and abundance of moth species, subsequently assessing species traits to determine potential associations with their presence in anthropogenically modified landscapes. This study design provides a unique opportunity to assess temporal changes in moth communities and their responses to shifts in environmental conditions, including anthropogenic impacts. Across the V & auml;sterg & ouml;tland and Sm & aring;land provinces in Sweden, we recorded 776 moth taxa belonging to fourteen different taxonomic families of mainly Macroheterocera. We captured 44% and 28% of the total moth species known from these provinces in our traps in Bor & aring;s (V & auml;sterg & ouml;tland) and Kalmar (Sm & aring;land), respectively. In 2020, the species richness and abundance were higher in Bor & aring;s than in Kalmar, while the Shannon and Simpson diversity indices revealed a higher species diversity in Kalmar. Between 1974 and 2019, the colonisation rates of the provinces increased faster in Sm & aring;land. Ninety-three species were found to have colonised these provinces since 1974, showing that species richness increased over the study period. We reveal significant associations between the probability of a species being present in the traps and distinct traits compared to a provincial species pool. Traits over-represented in the traps included species with a high variation in colour patterns, generalist habitat preferences, extended flight periods, lower host plant specificity, and overwintering primarily as eggs. Our findings underscore the ongoing ecological filtering that favours certain species-specific traits. This study sheds light on the roles of climate change and anthropogenic impacts in shaping moth biodiversity, offers key insights into the ecological processes involved, and can guide future conservation efforts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
abundance, anthropogenic effects, community composition, environmental changes, flight period changes, insect conservation, moth populations, range shifts, species richness, southern Sweden
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-124634 (URN)10.3390/insects14080702 (DOI)001055785500001 ()37623412 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85169050457 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-15 Created: 2023-09-15 Last updated: 2023-11-07Bibliographically approved
Betzholtz, P.-E., Forsman, A. & Franzén, M. (2023). Associations of 16-Year Population Dynamics in Range-Expanding Moths with Temperature and Years since Establishment. Insects, 14(1), Article ID 55.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations of 16-Year Population Dynamics in Range-Expanding Moths with Temperature and Years since Establishment
2023 (English)In: Insects, ISSN 2075-4450, E-ISSN 2075-4450, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Simple Summary There has been a widespread decline of many plants and animals driven at least partly by climate change. This pattern is not universal, and certain taxa are increasing in abundance and distribution. A better understanding of population dynamics and range expansions in different areas and how different taxa respond to changing temperatures is therefore important, as we are facing a warmer and more fluctuating climate in the future. In this study, we show that range-expanding moths in southeastern Sweden have increased their species richness over time and that abundance and population growth increase during years with higher temperatures. We also show that population growth in range-expanding moths is fastest in the first years after establishment in an area. These shifts in distribution and abundance of moths may lead to rapid and dramatic changes in community compositions, with potentially widespread consequences for species interactions and ecosystem functioning. Parallel to the widespread decline of plants and animals, there is also an ongoing expansion of many species, which is especially pronounced in certain taxonomic groups and in northern latitudes. In order to inform an improved understanding of population dynamics in range-expanding taxa, we studied species richness, abundance and population growth in a sample of 25,138 individuals representing 107 range-expanding moth species at three light-trap sites in southeastern Sweden over 16 years (from 2005 to 2020) in relation to temperature and years since colonisation. Species richness and average abundance across range-expanding moths increased significantly over time, indicating a continuous influx of species expanding their ranges northward. Furthermore, average abundance and population growth increased significantly with increasing average ambient air temperature during the recording year, and average abundance also increased significantly with increasing temperature during the previous year. In general, population growth increased between years (growth rate > 1), although the population growth rate decreased significantly in association with years since colonisation. These findings highlight that, in contrast to several other studies in different parts of the world, species richness and abundance have increased in southeastern Sweden, partly because the warming climate enables range-expanding moths to realise their capacity for rapid distribution shifts and population growth. This may lead to fast and dramatic changes in community composition, with consequences for species interactions and the functioning of ecosystems. These findings are also of applied relevance for agriculture and forestry in that they can help to forecast the impacts of future invasive pest species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
abundance, climate change, light trap, migration, moths, population growth, Sweden, temperature
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-119775 (URN)10.3390/insects14010055 (DOI)000915599700001 ()36661983 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85146746443 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-16 Created: 2023-03-16 Last updated: 2023-08-31Bibliographically approved
Sunde, J., Franzén, M., Betzholtz, P.-E., Francioli, Y., Pettersson, L. B., Poyry, J., . . . Forsman, A. (2023). Century-long butterfly range expansions in northern Europe depend on climate, land use and species traits. Communications Biology, 6(1), Article ID 601.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Century-long butterfly range expansions in northern Europe depend on climate, land use and species traits
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2023 (English)In: Communications Biology, E-ISSN 2399-3642, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 601Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change is an important driver of range shifts and community composition changes. Still, little is known about how the responses are influenced by the combination of land use, species interactions and species traits. We integrate climate and distributional data for 131 butterfly species in Sweden and Finland and show that cumulative species richness has increased with increasing temperature over the past 120 years. Average provincial species richness increased by 64% (range 15-229%), from 46 to 70. The rate and direction of range expansions have not matched the temperature changes, in part because colonisations have been modified by other climatic variables, land use and vary according to species characteristics representing ecological generalisation and species interactions. Results emphasise the role of a broad ecological filtering, whereby a mismatch between environmental conditions and species preferences limit the ability to disperse and establish populations in emerging climates and novel areas, with potentially widespread implications for ecosystem functioning. Century-long data on climate and butterfly distribution show that species richness has increased with increasing temperature, and that the rate and direction of range expansions are influenced by land use, species interactions and species traits.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2023
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-122877 (URN)10.1038/s42003-023-04967-z (DOI)000999970100001 ()37270651 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85160878803 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-06-28 Created: 2023-06-28 Last updated: 2023-08-31Bibliographically approved
Seidel, L., Broman, E., Nilsson, E., Ståhle, M., Ketzer, J. M., Pérez Martínez, C., . . . Dopson, M. (2023). Climate change-related warming reduces thermal sensitivity and modifies metabolic activity of coastal benthic bacterial communities. The ISME Journal, 17, 855-869
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate change-related warming reduces thermal sensitivity and modifies metabolic activity of coastal benthic bacterial communities
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2023 (English)In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 17, p. 855-869Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Besides long-term average temperature increases, climate change is projected to result in a higher frequency of marine heatwaves. Coastal zones are some of the most productive and vulnerable ecosystems, with many stretches already under anthropogenic pressure. Microorganisms in coastal areas are central to marine energy and nutrient cycling and therefore, it is important to understand how climate change will alter these ecosystems. Using a long-term heated bay (warmed for 50 years) in comparison with an unaffected adjacent control bay and an experimental short-term thermal (9 days at 6–35 °C) incubation experiment, this study provides new insights into how coastal benthic water and surface sediment bacterial communities respond to temperature change. Benthic bacterial communities in the two bays reacted differently to temperature increases with productivity in the heated bay having a broader thermal tolerance compared with that in the control bay. Furthermore, the transcriptional analysis showed that the heated bay benthic bacteria had higher transcript numbers related to energy metabolism and stress compared to the control bay, while short-term elevated temperatures in the control bay incubation experiment induced a transcript response resembling that observed in the heated bay field conditions. In contrast, a reciprocal response was not observed for the heated bay community RNA transcripts exposed to lower temperatures indicating a potential tipping point in community response may have been reached. In summary, long-term warming modulates the performance, productivity, and resilience of bacterial communities in response to warming.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
Keywords
Climate change, bacterial production, RNA-Seq., 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, thermal performance, benthic zone
National Category
Bioinformatics and Systems Biology Microbiology Climate Research Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-111587 (URN)10.1038/s41396-023-01395-z (DOI)000959217900001 ()36977742 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85151163130 (Scopus ID)
Note

Is included in the dissertation as a manuscript titled: Climate change related warming reduces thermal sensitivity of performance and metabolic plasticity of benthic zone bacterial communities

Available from: 2022-04-25 Created: 2022-04-25 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Berggren, H., Nordahl, O., Yildirim, Y., Larsson, P., Tibblin, P. & Forsman, A. (2023). Effects of environmental translocation and host characteristics on skin microbiomes of sun-basking fish. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, 290(2013), Article ID 20231608.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of environmental translocation and host characteristics on skin microbiomes of sun-basking fish
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2023 (English)In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 290, no 2013, article id 20231608Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Variation in the composition of skin-associated microbiomes has been attributed to host species, geographical location and habitat, but the role of intraspecific phenotypic variation among host individuals remains elusive. We explored if and how host environment and different phenotypic traits were associated with microbiome composition. We conducted repeated sampling of dorsal and ventral skin microbiomes of carp individuals (Cyprinus carpio) before and after translocation from laboratory conditions to a semi-natural environment. Both alpha and beta diversity of skin-associated microbiomes increased substantially within and among individuals following translocation, particularly on dorsal body sites. The variation in microbiome composition among hosts was significantly associated with body site, sun-basking, habitat switch and growth, but not temperature gain while basking, sex, personality nor colour morph. We suggest that the overall increase in the alpha and beta diversity estimates among hosts were induced by individuals expressing greater variation in behaviours and thus exposure to potential colonizers in the pond environment compared with the laboratory. Our results exemplify how biological diversity at one level of organization (phenotypic variation among and within fish host individuals) together with the external environment impacts biological diversity at a higher hierarchical level of organization (richness and composition of fish-associated microbial communities).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society, 2023
Keywords
freshwater, biodiversity, microbiota, skin microbiome, teleost, 16S amplicons
National Category
Ecology Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-126932 (URN)10.1098/rspb.2023.1608 (DOI)001130342600003 ()38113936 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85180809066 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-01-19 Created: 2024-01-19 Last updated: 2024-02-22Bibliographically approved
Betzholtz, P.-E., Forsman, A. & Franzén, M. (2023). Increased Abundance Coincides with Range Expansions and Phenology Shifts: A Long-Term Case Study of Two Noctuid Moths in Sweden. Diversity, 15(12), Article ID 1177.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increased Abundance Coincides with Range Expansions and Phenology Shifts: A Long-Term Case Study of Two Noctuid Moths in Sweden
2023 (English)In: Diversity, E-ISSN 1424-2818, Vol. 15, no 12, article id 1177Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Environmental and climatic changes are inducing population declines in numerous species. However, certain species demonstrate remarkable resilience, exhibiting both population growth and range expansion. This longitudinal study in Sweden carried out over two decades (2004–2023) examines the noctuid moths Mythimna albipuncta and Hoplodrina ambigua. Abundance and phenology data were gathered from three light traps in southeastern Sweden and integrated with distribution and phenology data from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility. In M. albipuncta, the distribution area expanded from 7 to 76 occupied grids (60 km2) and the abundance increased from 7 to 6136 individuals, while in H. ambigua, the distribution area expanded from 1 to 87 occupied grids and the abundance increased from 0 to 6937 individuals, during the course of the study. Furthermore, a positive yearly association was observed between the number of occupied grids and light trap abundance for each species. We also found significant extensions in the adult flight periods of more than 100 days in both species. Light traps emerged as an effective monitoring tool, with light trap abundance as a reliable proxy for distribution changes. Our findings demonstrate that the studied species cope very well with environmental and climatic changes. Given their role as dominant links between primary producers and higher trophic levels, abundance and distribution shifts of these ecological engineers have the potential to cascade up and down in the ecosystem.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
citizen science, exponential growth, geographic range, Lepidoptera, light trap, population dynamics, Sweden
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-127937 (URN)10.3390/d15121177 (DOI)001131078100001 ()2-s2.0-85180683914 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-02-22 Created: 2024-02-22 Last updated: 2024-02-29Bibliographically approved
Polic, D., Yildirim, Y., Vila, R., Ribeiro Cardoso, P. R., Franzén, M. & Forsman, A. (2023). Large-scale spatial variation and phenotypic integration in three Argynnini species inform about functions and evolutionary drivers of butterfly wings. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, 11, Article ID 1087859.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Large-scale spatial variation and phenotypic integration in three Argynnini species inform about functions and evolutionary drivers of butterfly wings
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2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2296-701X, Vol. 11, article id 1087859Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding how large-scale environmental variability may shape the distribution of phenotypic variation remains central to evolutionary biology. Across-species comparisons of trait variation alongside environmental gradients may offer valuable insights into how different species may respond to similar selective pressures. We conducted a comparative morphological study (>32° latitude and >47° longitude) on three closely related Argynnini butterfly species, Speyeria aglaja, Fabriciana adippe, and F. niobe. We measured wing size and coloration to assess (1) whether they respond similarly or differently to environmental factors (longitude, latitude, altitude, temperature, precipitation, solar radiation, wind speed); (2) if these factors correspond with those associated with the species’ genetic structure based on a previous study; and (3) whether correlations between phenotypic traits within individuals are species-specific. We found common and species-specific associations of climatic (precipitation, wind speed) and geographic (longitude, altitude) factors with the composite phenotypic variation. Wing size was associated with different variables in the studied species, while melanisation mainly increased in cooler regions in all species, suggesting that the need for temperature regulation is a strong selective pressure on melanisation. Wing size was associated with the genetic structure in all species, highlighting the functional importance of this trait. The environmental drivers associated with the phenotypic variation in S. aglaja and F. adippe were largely the same as those associated with their genetic structure, hinting at a genetic underpinning of the observed morphological variation due to local adaption. We report some distinct intraspecific trait correlations in S. aglaja and F. adippe, indicative of independent phenotypic integration. These phenotypes seem to be associated with protection against predators and thermal regulation in the respective habitats of both species, suggesting that similar selective pressures have resulted in the evolution of different trait combinations. Some of the inter-specific differences could be related to diverging niche breadths and dispersal capacities, exemplifying that the evolution of trait integration and spatial phenotypic differentiation may differ between closely related species with overlapping distribution ranges. Our findings highlight the importance of comparative assessments of variation, and demonstrate that the relative effects of drivers of variability may vary between sister species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Ecology, Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-122553 (URN)10.3389/fevo.2023.1087859 (DOI)001020101100001 ()2-s2.0-85164453877 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-06-22 Created: 2023-06-22 Last updated: 2023-08-31Bibliographically approved
Seidel, L., Sachpazidou, V., Ketzer, J. M., Hylander, S., Forsman, A. & Dopson, M. (2023). Long-term warming modulates diversity, vertical structuring of microbial communities, and sulfate reduction in coastal Baltic Sea sediments. Frontiers in Microbiology, 14, Article ID 1099445.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term warming modulates diversity, vertical structuring of microbial communities, and sulfate reduction in coastal Baltic Sea sediments
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2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Microbiology, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 14, article id 1099445Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Coastal waters such as those found in the Baltic Sea already suffer from anthropogenic related problems including increased algal blooming and hypoxia while ongoing and future climate change will likely worsen these effects. Microbial communities in sediments play a crucial role in the marine energy- and nutrient cycling, and how they are affected by climate change and shape the environment in the future is of great interest. The aims of this study were to investigate potential effects of prolonged warming on microbial community composition and nutrient cycling including sulfate reduction in surface (similar to 0.5 cm) to deeper sediments (similar to 24 cm). To investigate this, 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing was performed, and sulfate concentrations were measured and compared between sediments in a heated bay (which has been used as a cooling water outlet from a nearby nuclear power plant for approximately 50 years) and a nearby but unaffected control bay. The results showed variation in overall microbial diversity according to sediment depth and higher sulfate flux in the heated bay compared to the control bay. A difference in vertical community structure reflected increased relative abundances of sulfur oxidizing- and sulfate reducing bacteria along with a higher proportion of archaea, such as Bathyarchaeota, in the heated compared to the control bay. This was particularly evident closer to the sediment surface, indicating a compression of geochemical zones in the heated bay. These results corroborate findings in previous studies and additionally point to an amplified effect of prolonged warming deeper in the sediment, which could result in elevated concentrations of toxic compounds and greenhouse gases closer to the sediment surface.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-120053 (URN)10.3389/fmicb.2023.1099445 (DOI)000967877400001 ()37065140 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85152780217 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, FR-2020/0008The Crafoord Foundation, 20170539Magnus Bergvall Foundation, 2019-03116
Available from: 2023-04-03 Created: 2023-04-03 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Hall, M., Nordahl, O., Forsman, A. & Tibblin, P. (2023). Maternal size in perch (Perca fluviatilis) influences the capacity of offspring to cope with different temperatures. Frontiers in Marine Science, 10, Article ID 1175176.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maternal size in perch (Perca fluviatilis) influences the capacity of offspring to cope with different temperatures
2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 10, article id 1175176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change causes earlier and warmer springs in seasonal environments and a higher incidence of extreme weather events. In aquatic environments, this changes the thermal conditions during spawning, and the thermal performance of eggs and embryos may determine the consequences of climate change on recruitment. In iteroparous species with indeterminate growth, the eggs produced by a given female in successive years will increase in size as the female grows larger and likely be exposed to different temperatures during incubation due to annual variation in spring phenology. Still, we know little about whether differences in maternal size impact the temperature-dependent performance and viability of the offspring. Here we utilised a thermal gradient laboratory experiment on Baltic Sea perch (Perca fluviatilis) to investigate how maternal size influence the temperature dependent hatching success of the offspring. The results uncovered a positive relationship between maternal size and average hatching success, but the shape of the relationship (reaction norm) linking hatching success to incubation temperature was independent of maternal size. However, we did find an association between maternal size and the variance (S.D. and CV) in hatching success across temperatures, with larger females producing offspring with maintained performance (less sensitive) across temperature treatments, indicative of flatter reaction norms and broader thermal niches. This suggests that maintaining the size distribution of fish populations, for instance through regulations of size-selective fisheries, may be important to aid the long-term productivity and viability of fish populations and ultimately conserve the function and services of ecosystems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
Keywords
Baltic Sea, climate change, hatching, fish, global warming, reproduction, spawning, thermal tolerance
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-123587 (URN)10.3389/fmars.2023.1175176 (DOI)001026675800001 ()2-s2.0-85165047323 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-10 Created: 2023-08-10 Last updated: 2024-02-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9598-7618

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