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Sivefors, P. (2018). A Kingdom for a Man: Representing Masculinity in Late Elizabethan Verse Satire. In: The 64th Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America: New Orleans, 22 March - 24 March 2018. Paper presented at The 64th Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America : New Orleans, 22 March - 24 March 2018. All Academic
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Kingdom for a Man: Representing Masculinity in Late Elizabethan Verse Satire
2018 (English)In: The 64th Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America: New Orleans, 22 March - 24 March 2018, All Academic , 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The present paper suggests that the representations of manhood in Elizabethan satire mobilized cultural and sexual values at odds with prevailing masculine ideals of self-control. Thus, the paper investigates to what extent the conventions and conditions of early modern satire imply redefinitions of or challenges to early modern masculinity. While other types of poetry often explore emotional weakness such as tears or effeminacy, even representing ‘alternative’ masculinities, satire is extensively preoccupied with other forms of flawed manhood, such as the angry, dissolute or reckless man. Elizabethan satire explores countercodes of manly conduct, although such countercodes are manifestly different from the ‘soft’ or ‘effeminate’ man of much lyric poetry. Instead, the disorderly and unruly manhood in Elizabethan satire should be understood as an interrogation of classical genre conventions that also responds to early modern patriarchal notions of moderation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
All Academic, 2018
Keyword
Satire, masculinity, Elizabethan literature, early modern literature, Joseph Hall, John Marston, Everard Guilpin
National Category
Specific Languages General Literature Studies
Research subject
Humanities, English literature; Humanities, Comparative literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-71831 (URN)
Conference
The 64th Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America : New Orleans, 22 March - 24 March 2018
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-02616
Available from: 2018-03-27 Created: 2018-03-27 Last updated: 2018-05-21Bibliographically approved
Sivefors, P. (2018). A supposed quotation from Augustine in Thomas Nashe's Christs teares over Jerusalem. Notes and Queries, 65(1), 49-49
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A supposed quotation from Augustine in Thomas Nashe's Christs teares over Jerusalem
2018 (English)In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 49-49Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Humanities, Comparative literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72024 (URN)10.1093/notesj/gjx216 (DOI)000427001100019 ()
Available from: 2018-03-29 Created: 2018-03-29 Last updated: 2018-03-29Bibliographically approved
Sivefors, P. (2017). “A whole booke of his Retractations”: Thomas Nashe’s Christs Teares over Jerusalem and the Augustinian Narrative of Conversion. In: The Mimesis of Change: Conversion and Peripety in Life Stories. Paper presented at The Mimesis of Change. Conversion and Peripety in Life Stories.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“A whole booke of his Retractations”: Thomas Nashe’s Christs Teares over Jerusalem and the Augustinian Narrative of Conversion
2017 (English)In: The Mimesis of Change: Conversion and Peripety in Life Stories, 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper suggests that Thomas Nashe’s religious pamphlet Christs Teares over Jerusalem (1593) draws on an Augustinian narrative of religious conversion. Long regarded as an anomaly in Nashe’s otherwise secular output, Christs Teares was offered to the pious Lady Elizabeth Carey, and Nashe arguably adopted elements of Augustine – including direct references and similarities of tone and narration – in his work in order to find patronage from the Carey household. In terms of life-writing, Nashe’s self-presentation in the pamphlet is intensely bound up with the events of his own life, and the book as a whole is offered as an extended piece of repentance in the wake of Nashe’s much-publicized conflict with Gabriel Harvey in the 1590s. Thus, Christs Teares is also configured by Nashe as “the Teares of my penne” – a narrative of conversion that draws deliberate parallels between Augustine, the “young man puft vppe with the Ambition of that tyme”, and Nashe’s own biography.

Keyword
Thomas Nashe, Christs Teares over Jerusalem, Elizabethan literature, early modern literature, conversion narratives, St. Augustine
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Humanities, Comparative literature; Humanities, English literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-62547 (URN)
Conference
The Mimesis of Change. Conversion and Peripety in Life Stories
Available from: 2017-04-21 Created: 2017-04-21 Last updated: 2018-03-19Bibliographically approved
Sivefors, P. (2017). Anachronism as Aesthetic Device in Elizabethan Satire. In: Kingston Shakespeare Seminar : Shakespearean Anachronism Conference: Saturday, February 18, 2017 Rose Theatre, Kingston-upon-Thames. Paper presented at Kingston Shakespeare Seminar : Shakespearean Anachronism Conference : Saturday, February 18, 2017 Rose Theatre, Kingston-upon-Thames.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anachronism as Aesthetic Device in Elizabethan Satire
2017 (English)In: Kingston Shakespeare Seminar : Shakespearean Anachronism Conference: Saturday, February 18, 2017 Rose Theatre, Kingston-upon-Thames, 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Largely ignored by theorists of satire, anachronism as a narrative and thematic device becomes particularly relevant to understand English satire produced during the 1590s and early 1600s. While generally building on principles of Verfremdung, satire would develop in the Elizabethan period to embrace anachronism as a way of delimiting its own contemporary world. In the writings of John Marston, Joseph Hall, Donne and others, the obscurity of allusions is highlighted by the insistent use of Latinate names as well as Roman terms, practices and objects. From a reader’s point of view such anachronisms of satirical writing become a means of signalling both inclusion (in the select group who might understand the references) and exclusion (since anyone claiming to understand the references would also be implied to be, in Marston’s words, a ”lewd Censurer”). Thus, rather than mere ’imitation’ or a straightforward means to the end of displaying classical learning, anachronism is a crucial modus operandi of Elizabethan satire, one that simultaneously transcended and perpetuated the distance from the literary past.  

Keyword
anachronism, satire, Elizabethan literature, early modern poetry, John Marston, Joseph Hall
National Category
General Literature Studies
Research subject
Humanities, English literature; Humanities, Comparative literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-60754 (URN)
Conference
Kingston Shakespeare Seminar : Shakespearean Anachronism Conference : Saturday, February 18, 2017 Rose Theatre, Kingston-upon-Thames
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-02616
Available from: 2017-02-19 Created: 2017-02-19 Last updated: 2017-02-27Bibliographically approved
Sivefors, P. (2017). “Didone regina di Cartagine” di Christopher Marlowe : Metamorfosi virgiliane nel Cinquecento. Antonio Ziosi, ed. and trans: Lingue e Letterature Carocci 202 ; Centro Studi : La permanenza del Classico 29. Rome : Carocci editore, 2015. 358 pp. €29. [Review]. Renaissance quarterly, 70(1), 412-414
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Didone regina di Cartagine” di Christopher Marlowe : Metamorfosi virgiliane nel Cinquecento. Antonio Ziosi, ed. and trans: Lingue e Letterature Carocci 202 ; Centro Studi : La permanenza del Classico 29. Rome : Carocci editore, 2015. 358 pp. €29.
2017 (English)In: Renaissance quarterly, ISSN 0034-4338, E-ISSN 1935-0236, Vol. 70, no 1, p. 412-414Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2017
Keyword
Christopher Marlowe, Dido Queene of Carthage, translation, early modern literature, Elizabethan drama
National Category
General Literature Studies
Research subject
Humanities, English literature; Humanities, Comparative literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-61290 (URN)10.1086/691951 (DOI)000395774100124 ()
Available from: 2017-03-10 Created: 2017-03-10 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Price, E., Sivefors, P., Sharrett, E., Smith, H. F. & Whitehead, C. (2017). Renaissance Drama: Excluding Shakespeare. Year's Work in English Studies, 96(1), 466-503
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Renaissance Drama: Excluding Shakespeare
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2017 (English)In: Year's Work in English Studies, ISSN 0084-4144, E-ISSN 1471-6801, Vol. 96, no 1, p. 466-503Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Keyword
Christopher Marlowe, criticism during 2015
National Category
General Literature Studies
Research subject
Humanities, English literature; Humanities, Comparative literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-68116 (URN)10.1093/ywes/max009 (DOI)
Note

A survey of criticism on Renaissance drama.

Available from: 2017-09-28 Created: 2017-09-28 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Sivefors, P. (2017). Satir, ekfras och enargeia: Visualisering hos John Marston och Thomas Lodge. In: Jahn Holljen Thon, Andreas G. Lombnæs (Ed.), Medier, historie og mening: Studier i kulturelle formidlingsformer (pp. 55-68). Oslo: Portal forlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Satir, ekfras och enargeia: Visualisering hos John Marston och Thomas Lodge
2017 (Swedish)In: Medier, historie og mening: Studier i kulturelle formidlingsformer / [ed] Jahn Holljen Thon, Andreas G. Lombnæs, Oslo: Portal forlag, 2017, p. 55-68Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oslo: Portal forlag, 2017
Keyword
Satir, visualisering, renässanslitteratur, elisabetansk litteratur, tidigmodern litteratur, John Marston, Thomas Lodge
National Category
General Literature Studies
Research subject
Humanities, English literature; Humanities, Comparative literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-61112 (URN)9788283141139 (ISBN)
Projects
Satir och maskulinitet i tidigmodern engelsk litteratur, 1590 – 1603
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-02616
Available from: 2017-03-06 Created: 2017-03-06 Last updated: 2017-04-19Bibliographically approved
Sivefors, P. (2017). “Some sacred rage warmes all my vaines”: The Aesthetics of Viscerality in Sixteenth-Century Satire. In: Estetisk erfarenhet i tidigmoderna kulturer, 26-27 okt 2017: [ Aesthetic Experience in Early Modern Cultures, Oct 26-27 2017 ]. Paper presented at Estetisk erfarenhet i tidigmoderna kulturer, 26-27 okt 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Some sacred rage warmes all my vaines”: The Aesthetics of Viscerality in Sixteenth-Century Satire
2017 (English)In: Estetisk erfarenhet i tidigmoderna kulturer, 26-27 okt 2017: [ Aesthetic Experience in Early Modern Cultures, Oct 26-27 2017 ], 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In the early modern period, the experience of satire – of both reading and writing it – was commonly described in bodily terms. Elizabethan satire was no exception and a verse satirist like John Marston could have his persona declare that he “bristle[s] vp with plumes of pride” over critical responses. While theories of humors and passions provided early modern writers had a comprehensive vocabulary for describing the experience of art and literature in physiological terms, satire particularly stands out because the writing and reading of it was commonly referred to in terms of physical immoderation (aggressiveness, but also e.g. sexual pleasure). Stoicism in this regard presented a philosophical corrective to several Elizabethan satirists, but their relation to this tradition was ambivalent at best. What remains clear, and as this paper suggests, criticism of satire needs to be more attentive to the physiological dimension of early modern aesthetic experience. Thus, the paper contributes to how ”affect” and ”embodiment” can be contextualized from the point of view of early modern aesthetic practice.

Keyword
early modern satire, aesthetics, aesthetic experience, embodiment, Elizabethan poetry
National Category
General Literature Studies
Research subject
Humanities, English literature; Humanities, Comparative literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-68502 (URN)
Conference
Estetisk erfarenhet i tidigmoderna kulturer, 26-27 okt 2017
Projects
Satir och maskulinitet i tidigmodern engelsk litteratur, 1590-1603
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-02616
Note

Ej belagd 180328

Available from: 2017-10-30 Created: 2017-10-30 Last updated: 2018-03-28Bibliographically approved
Sivefors, P. (2016). Committing Authorship: Thomas Nashe and the Engaged Reader. Etudes episteme (29), 1-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Committing Authorship: Thomas Nashe and the Engaged Reader
2016 (English)In: Etudes episteme, ISSN 1634-0450, E-ISSN 1634-0450, no 29, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Criticism on Thomas Nashe has been notoriously preoccupied with the idea that he had nothing to say. While recent analyses have shown that his works in fact do say lots of specific things about the literary culture of his time, Nashe’s peculiar form and style remain at the centre of attention. This essay suggests that Nashe’s preoccupation with style is also what invokes a sense of commitment in his readers; by their use of the author’s persona and their often baffling narration, Nashe’s works also force the reader to consider questions of what literature is, why we read it and who has control over it. In other words, the repeated admissions of incompetence and narrative digressions have the result of engaging the readers in exercising their judgement and deliberating on aspects of style, narrative and, generally, what literature is.

Keyword
Thomas Nashe, authorship, commitment in literature, Elizabethan literature
National Category
General Literature Studies Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities, English literature; Humanities, Comparative literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-54651 (URN)10.4000/episteme.1065 (DOI)000407027800004 ()
Available from: 2016-07-16 Created: 2016-07-16 Last updated: 2018-04-17Bibliographically approved
Sivefors, P. (2016). Lisping Amorists and snaphaunce satirists: Satire, Immoderation and the Bishops' Ban of 1599. In: Presented at New Perspectives on Censorship in Early Modern England: Politics, Literature and Religion: 1-3 December 2016. Paper presented at New Perspectives on Censorship in Early Modern England : Politics, Literature and Religion, 1-3 December 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lisping Amorists and snaphaunce satirists: Satire, Immoderation and the Bishops' Ban of 1599
2016 (English)In: Presented at New Perspectives on Censorship in Early Modern England: Politics, Literature and Religion: 1-3 December 2016, 2016Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Keyword
censorship, early modern literature, Elizabethan satire, immoderation, Bishops Ban
National Category
Specific Literatures General Literature Studies
Research subject
Humanities, English literature; Humanities, Comparative literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-58637 (URN)
Conference
New Perspectives on Censorship in Early Modern England : Politics, Literature and Religion, 1-3 December 2016
Available from: 2016-12-05 Created: 2016-12-05 Last updated: 2017-04-19Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2469-6431

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