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Goldhahn, J. (2019). Att låta stumma stenar tala – om formandet av ett nytt arkeologiskap under 1700-talet: Berge, Ragnhild & Henriksen, Merete Moe (red.). Arkeologi og kulturhistorie fra Nordsjøen til Bottenhavet. Festskrift till professor Birgitta Berglund [Review]. Vitark, Acta Archaeologica Nodrosienia 11, 40-57
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Att låta stumma stenar tala – om formandet av ett nytt arkeologiskap under 1700-talet: Berge, Ragnhild & Henriksen, Merete Moe (red.). Arkeologi og kulturhistorie fra Nordsjøen til Bottenhavet. Festskrift till professor Birgitta Berglund
2019 (Swedish)In: Vitark, Acta Archaeologica Nodrosienia 11, p. 40-57Article, book review (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Trondheim: Vitark, 2019
Keywords
History of archaeology, 18th century archaeology, Linnæus
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-86209 (URN)
Available from: 2019-07-05 Created: 2019-07-05 Last updated: 2019-08-08
Goldhahn, J. (2019). North European rock art: A long-term perspective. In: Bruno David, Ian J. McNiven (Ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology and Anthropology of Rock Art: (pp. 51-72). New York, NY: Oxford University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>North European rock art: A long-term perspective
2019 (English)In: The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology and Anthropology of Rock Art / [ed] Bruno David, Ian J. McNiven, New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2019, p. 51-72Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter offers a long-term perspective on rock art in northern Europe. It first provides an overview of research on the rock art traditions of northern Europe before discussing the societies and cultures that created such traditions. It then considers examples of rock art made by hunter-gatherer societies in northern Europe, focusing on the first rock art boom related to Neolithization. It also examines the second rock art boom, which was associated with social and religious changes within farming communities that took place around 1600–1400 bc. The chapter concludes by analysing the breakdown of long-distance networks in the transition from the Bronze Age to the Iron Age and its consequences for the making of rock art within the southern traditions, as well as the use of rock art sites during the Pre-Roman Iron Age, Roman Iron Age, and Migration Period.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
Rock art, Archaeology, Northern Europe, long time perspective, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, Russia
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81145 (URN)10.1093/oxfordhb/9780190607357.013.1 (DOI)2-s2.0-85060581743 (Scopus ID)9780190607357 (ISBN)978-0-19-060736-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved
Goldhahn, J. (2019). On unfolding present and past (rock art) worldings. Time & Mind, 12(2), 63-77
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On unfolding present and past (rock art) worldings
2019 (English)In: Time & Mind, ISSN 1751-696X, E-ISSN 1751-6978, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 63-77Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper is set out to unfold present and past (rock art) ontologies or 'worldings'. It aims to present different modes of identifications, and the often intricate relationships between humans and other-than-humans from a relational perspective, with the hope of challenging our western perception of the world. It presents some thoughts on how different ontologies are unfolded through artworks and material culture, and how these worldings differ from one another.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-85633 (URN)10.1080/1751696X.2019.1610217 (DOI)000472113700002 ()2-s2.0-85067629831 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-06-19 Created: 2019-06-19 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Goldhahn, J. (Ed.). (2019). Rock art worldings: part 1 (2ed.). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rock art worldings: part 1
2019 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2019 Edition: 2
Keywords
rock art, ontological turn, northern Europe
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-85634 (URN)
Available from: 2019-06-19 Created: 2019-06-19 Last updated: 2019-08-07
Goldhahn, J. (2019). The wings of Skedemosse: Traces of bird divinations. In: Cecilia Ljung, Anna Andreasson Sjögren, Ingrid Berg, Elin Engström, Ann-Mari Hållans Stenholm, Kristina Jonsson, Alison Klevnäs, Linda Qviström, Torun Zachrisson (Ed.), Tidens landskap: en vänbok till Anders Andrén (pp. 108-109). Lund: Nordic Academic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The wings of Skedemosse: Traces of bird divinations
2019 (English)In: Tidens landskap: en vänbok till Anders Andrén / [ed] Cecilia Ljung, Anna Andreasson Sjögren, Ingrid Berg, Elin Engström, Ann-Mari Hållans Stenholm, Kristina Jonsson, Alison Klevnäs, Linda Qviström, Torun Zachrisson, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2019, p. 108-109Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2019
Keywords
Skedemosse, Tacitus, Bird divination
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-84734 (URN)9789188909121 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-06-07 Created: 2019-06-07 Last updated: 2019-08-15Bibliographically approved
Goldhahn, J. & Papmehl-Dufay, L. (Eds.). (2018). Albrunnaskeppet – arkeologisk undersökning september 2016. Kalmar: Linnéuniversitetet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Albrunnaskeppet – arkeologisk undersökning september 2016
2018 (Swedish)Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This report presents the results from the excavation by Linnaeus University in September 2016 of a ship-shaped stone setting at Albrunna, SW Öland, Sweden. The work was initiated by the ac- cidental falling of the 4.5 m tall phallic Albrunna stone in 2014, and the subsequent plans of erecting a copy on the spot of the original stone. Earlier records describe the stone as part of a ship- shaped monument, an indication that the excavation managed to confirm. Through soil-stripping with an excavator, the dark colourations left by the removed stones revealed a c. 30 m long and 6 m wide ship-shaped monument, oriented in an approx- imately north-to-south direction. The dating of the monument is difficult, and the excavation results provide no clear answer. Judging on its layout and relation to surrounding sites, late Iron Age is a plausible suggestion, altough a Bronze Age date can- not be excluded. Finds were scarce but included a handful of fragments of burnt bone, as well as unburned bone in relatively small amounts. Of more recent date but still interesting in con- nection to the biographical history of the monument, a glass jar containing a hand-written letter was found hidden between the large phallic Albrunna stone and the boulder against which it was leaning. The letter was dated May 2012 and contained questions to the future from a young couple in times of trouble. After the excavation was finished, a casting was made of the original stone and the concrete copy was erected at the original site in May 2017.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kalmar: Linnéuniversitetet, 2018. p. 122
Series
Kalmar Studies in Archaeology ; XiV
Keywords
Archaeology, excavation, Öland, stone ship, burial, monument, phallic stone, reconstruction
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77065 (URN)
Note

Ej belagd 190116

Available from: 2018-08-06 Created: 2018-08-06 Last updated: 2019-01-16Bibliographically approved
Goldhahn, J. & May, S. K. (2018). Beyond the colonial encounter: Global approaches to contact rock art studies. Australian Archaeology, 84(3), 210-218
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond the colonial encounter: Global approaches to contact rock art studies
2018 (English)In: Australian Archaeology, ISSN 0312-2417, Vol. 84, no 3, p. 210-218Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How can rock art signal contact between different social groups and cultures? In this special collection of papers for Australian Archaeology, we find several different answers to this question, based on a number of Australian and International case studies first presented at The Second International Contact Rock Art Conference in Darwin, September 2013 and further developed in the years since. In this introductory paper, we set these important depictions in a global context, and explore some of the information that contact rock art offers in studying past, present and emerging societies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon-on-Thames: Routledge, 2018
Keywords
Rock art, contact rock art, cultural contact, archaeology, Indigenous/First Nations, global histories
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81627 (URN)10.1080/03122417.2018.1562639 (DOI)000468404300002 ()2-s2.0-85062702401 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-03 Created: 2019-04-03 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved
May, S. K., Johnston, I. G., Taçon, P. S. C., Domingo Sanz, I. & Goldhahn, J. (2018). Early Australian Anthropomorphs: Jabiluka's Dynamic Figure Rock Paintings. Cambridge Archaeological Journal, 28(1), 67-83
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early Australian Anthropomorphs: Jabiluka's Dynamic Figure Rock Paintings
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Cambridge Archaeological Journal, ISSN 0959-7743, E-ISSN 1474-0540, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 67-83Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Early depictions of anthropomorphs in rock art provide unique insights into life during the deep past. This includes human engagements with the environment, socio-cultural practices , gender and uses of material culture. In Australia, the Dynamic Figure rock paintings of Arnhem Land are recognized as the earliest style in the region where humans are explicitly depicted. Important questions, such as the nature and signicance of body adornment in rock art and society, can be explored, given the detailed nature of the human gurative art and the sheer number of scenes depicted. In this paper, we make a case for Dynamic Figure rock art having some of the earliest and most extensive depictions of complex an-thropomorph scenes found anywhere in the world.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2018
Keywords
Rock art, Australia
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-67409 (URN)10.1017/S095977431700052X (DOI)000419936200004 ()2-s2.0-85040780196 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-24 Created: 2017-08-24 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Goldhahn, J. (2018). Roaring rocks: an audio-visual perspective on hunter-gatherer engravings in Northern Sweden and Scandinavia. In: George Nash, Aron Masel (Ed.), Narratives and journeys in rock art: a reader (pp. 375-407). Oxford: Archaeopress
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Roaring rocks: an audio-visual perspective on hunter-gatherer engravings in Northern Sweden and Scandinavia
2018 (English)In: Narratives and journeys in rock art: a reader / [ed] George Nash, Aron Masel, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2018, p. 375-407Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This article attempts to extend the study of rock-art beyond the visual to include the non-visual experiences and perceptions of human beings. It is argued that there is ‘more than meets the eye’ when interpreting rock-art. Rather than restricting interpretation to the visual, the relationship between rock ‘art’, rock-art ‘site’ and the wider landscape is considered as articulated within a socially and historically specific Neolithic (ca. 4000–500 BC) hunter-gatherer ‘mindscape’. An audio-visual perspective is argued, where the auditory sense and visual experience of the landscape combine in a vital interplay that is essential to the interpretation of 25 out of about 80 known rock-engraving sites in northern Scandinavia (ca. 33%). These sites have in common a strong water-centric focus; in particular noisy, running water. This approach provides a more profound understanding of these rock-art sites and the prehistoric use of ‘images’ as transmitters of different kinds of knowledge from the mundane to the esoteric. It is argued that the ebb and flow of water and human breath are analogous within a frame of enquiry that also considers shamanistic practice in approaching and experiencing these rock-engraving sites. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Archaeopress, 2018
Keywords
rock art, audio-visual, northern Europe, mesolithic, neolithic, hunter gatherer
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78881 (URN)9781784915605 (ISBN)978 1 78491 561 2 (ISBN)
Note

Originially published in: Norwegian Archaeological Review Vol. 35, No. 1, 2002, pp. 29-61

Available from: 2018-11-19 Created: 2018-11-19 Last updated: 2019-02-11Bibliographically approved
Goldhahn, J. & Papmehl-Dufay, L. (Eds.). (2018). Storhögen på kustslätten. Om undersökningen av Risinge hög på Öland 2011. Kalmar: Linnéuniversitetet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Storhögen på kustslätten. Om undersökningen av Risinge hög på Öland 2011
2018 (Swedish)Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Denna skrift redovisar en undersökning av en bronsåldershög på södra Öland, Sverige

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kalmar: Linnéuniversitetet, 2018. p. 79
Series
Kalmar Studies in Archaeology ; 13
Keywords
Bronze Age, monument, barrow, burial ritual
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77064 (URN)
Note

Ej belagd 190116

Available from: 2018-08-06 Created: 2018-08-06 Last updated: 2019-01-16Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4640-8784

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