lnu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Publications (10 of 126) Show all publications
Chalise, P., Manandhar, P., Infanti, J. J., Campbell, J., Henriksen, L., Joshi, S. K., . . . Lukasse, M. (2023). Addressing Domestic Violence in Antenatal Care Environments in Nepal (ADVANCE) - study protocol for a randomized controlled trial evaluating a video intervention on domestic violence among pregnant women. BMC Public Health, 23(1), Article ID 1794.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Addressing Domestic Violence in Antenatal Care Environments in Nepal (ADVANCE) - study protocol for a randomized controlled trial evaluating a video intervention on domestic violence among pregnant women
Show others...
2023 (English)In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 1794Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BackgroundDomestic violence (DV) prior to, and during pregnancy is associated with increased risks for morbidity and mortality. As pregnant women routinely attend antenatal care this environment can be used to offer support to women experiencing DV. We have developed a video intervention that focuses on the use of behavioral coping strategies, particularly regarding disclosure of DV experiences. The effectiveness of this intervention will be evaluated through a randomized controlled trial (RCT) and a concurrent process evaluation.MethodsAll pregnant women between 12-22 weeks of gestation attending routine antenatal care at two tertiary level hospitals in Nepal are invited to participate. DV is measured using the Nepalese version of the Abuse Assessment Screen (N-AAS). Additionally, we measure participants' mental health, use of coping strategies, physical activity, and food security through a Color-coded Audio Computer Assisted Self Interview (C-ACASI). Irrespective of DV status, women are randomized into the intervention or control arm using a computer-generated randomization program. The intervention arm views a short video providing information on DV, safety improving actions women can take with an emphasis on disclosing the violence to a trusted person along with utilizing helplines available in Nepal. The control group watches a video on maintaining a healthy pregnancy and when to seek healthcare. The primary outcome is the proportion of women disclosing their DV status to someone. Secondary outcomes are symptoms of anxiety and depression, coping strategies, the use of safety measures and attitudes towards acceptance of abuse. Follow-up is conducted after 32 weeks of gestation, where both the intervention and control group participants view the intervention video after completing the follow-up questionnaire. Additionally, a mixed methods process evaluation of the intervention will be carried out to explore factors influencing the acceptability of the intervention and the disclosure of DV, including a review of project documents, individual interviews, and focus group discussions with members of the research team, healthcare providers, and participants.DiscussionThis study will provide evidence on whether pregnant women attending regular antenatal visits can enhance their safety by disclosing their experiences of violence to a trusted person after receiving a video intervention.Trial registrationThe study is registered in ClinicalTrial.gov with identifier NCT05199935.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Antenatal care, Domestic violence, Pregnancy, Randomized controlled trial, Nepal
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-125412 (URN)10.1186/s12889-023-16685-6 (DOI)001067652300007 ()37715147 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85171415463 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-01 Created: 2023-11-01 Last updated: 2023-11-21Bibliographically approved
Karim, K. R., Wahab, N., Hossain, D. & Swahnberg, K. (2023). Gender and Awareness of Laws on Intimate Partner Violence: A Study Among Bengali, Garo, and Santal Ethnic Communities in Rural Bangladesh. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 38(1-2), 6013-645
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender and Awareness of Laws on Intimate Partner Violence: A Study Among Bengali, Garo, and Santal Ethnic Communities in Rural Bangladesh
2023 (English)In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518, Vol. 38, no 1-2, p. 6013-645Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous studies on intimate partner violence (IPV) against women in Bangladesh rarely focused on the effectiveness of primary prevention strategies like legal remedies. There is also a lack of studies on the issues among the ethnic minority communities in the country. This study examines the awareness of laws on IPV (such as recognizing the abusive acts and knowing the sanctions) among the ethnic Garo and Santal and mainstream Bengali communities in rural Bangladesh. The study randomly included 1929 married women and men from 24 villages. It appeared that the respondents were not adequately aware of the relevant legal provisions. There were also gender and ethnic differences in the issues. On average, the respondents maintained a low score on recognizing abusive acts. The awareness was further lower among the women compared to the men. In addition, multivariate analysis indicated that the Bengali women had relatively a better understanding of the issues than the Garo and Santal women. However, the Garo men showed poorer awareness of recognizing the abusive acts than the Bengali and Santal men. On the other hand, the respondents also maintained a very insufficient knowledge of the sanctions against such abusive acts, whereas women also showed a lower awareness compared to their male counterparts. Data further revealed that the Santal women had a more inadequate understanding of the issues than the Bengali and Garo women. However, the Garo men had more awareness of the sanctions than the Bengali and Santal men. The study reveals that people are unfamiliar with the laws governing IPV. It shows that understanding legal issues is another field of gender and ethnic inequality in the country. We suggest that there should be intervention to make aware the citizen, mainly women of all ethnicities, to ensure the efficacy of the laws.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
laws, intimate partner violence, gender, ethnicity, Bangladesh
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-111619 (URN)10.1177/08862605221081926 (DOI)000784194000001 ()35437040 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85129303495 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-04-28 Created: 2022-04-28 Last updated: 2023-05-10Bibliographically approved
Danehorn, E., Peterson, U., Oscarsson, M., Smirthwaite, G. & Swahnberg, K. (2023). Mental health, self-rated health, risky sexual behaviour, alcohol use, and drug use among students who intend to spend a semester abroad - a cross-sectional study. Frontiers In Public Health, 11, Article ID 1116497.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mental health, self-rated health, risky sexual behaviour, alcohol use, and drug use among students who intend to spend a semester abroad - a cross-sectional study
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 11, article id 1116497Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: Our aim was to investigate potential differences in mental health, self-rated health, risky sexual behaviour, alcohol use, and drug use between (1) Prospective exchange students and campus students separated by sex, and (2) male and female students as a group. Method: Comparative cross-sectional design using an online survey containing the following instruments: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Sexual Behaviour in Young People in Sweden; Self-Rated Health Questionnaire; and General Health Questionnaire 12. One-hundred and fourteen prospective exchange students and 451 campus students participated in the study. Results: Male prospective exchange students rated their mental health as being better and had used cannabis more often compared with female prospective exchange students. Male prospective exchange students also rated their mental health as being better than male campus students. Female students, in general, rated their mental health as worse than male students. A larger proportion of male prospective exchange students had sex together with alcohol compared with male campus students, and a larger proportion of female prospective exchange students had sex with a new partner and drank more alcohol compared to female campus students. Conclusion: The result shows that risky alcohol use and sexually risky behaviour is prominent amongst prospective exchange students. It is possible that they will continue, and even increase their risky behaviour whilst abroad as they find themselves in a new social context, and free from influence of the rules and restrictions that they might have at home. With limited knowledge of the local culture, native language, and in an unfamiliar environment, it is possible that the risks will be enhanced and possibly decrease their health. This highlights the need for proactive interventions, conceivably with some variations in content between sexes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
Keywords
mental health, sexually risky behaviour, students, alcohol use, drug use, health
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-123614 (URN)10.3389/fpubh.2023.1116497 (DOI)001027978600001 ()37457242 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85164872289 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-11 Created: 2023-08-11 Last updated: 2023-10-10Bibliographically approved
Danehorn, E., Oscarsson, M., Smirthwaite, G., Peterson, U. & Swahnberg, K. (2023). Swedish exchange students' alcohol use, drug use, risky sexual behaviour, mental health, and self-rated health: A follow-up study. Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 40(3), 287-300
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish exchange students' alcohol use, drug use, risky sexual behaviour, mental health, and self-rated health: A follow-up study
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 287-300Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: To follow up on exchange students' alcohol use, drug use, mental health, self-rated health, and risky sexual behaviour after a semester abroad and to compare them with students who remained on campus. Methods: The study design was a follow-up study based on a previous baseline survey of 114 prospective exchange students and 451 campus students. Of the original 565 students, 48 (42.1%) prospective exchange students and 209 (43.3%) campus students responded to the follow-up. Both the baseline survey and the follow-up survey included the General Health Questionnaire 12, one single item from Self-Rated Health, and nine items from Knowledge, Attitudes and Sexual Behaviour in Young People in Sweden. Results: We found a statistically significant increase in the weekly consumption of alcohol among exchange students after their semester abroad. A larger proportion of exchange students had sex with a new partner and sex with more than three partners during their semester abroad compared to follow-up campus students. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that exchange students consume alcohol more frequently during their semester abroad and indulge in sexually risky behaviour. Exchange students' use of alcohol and sexually risky behaviour could be associated with even greater risks due to them being in an unknown environment, unfamiliar culture, and with limited support from family and friends. This highlights the need for further research on exchange students' experiences, especially concerning alcohol use and sex while abroad.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-119836 (URN)10.1177/14550725231160331 (DOI)000950302900001 ()2-s2.0-85150996472 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-17 Created: 2023-03-17 Last updated: 2023-08-31Bibliographically approved
Rahman, H., Karim, R., Habib, T. Z. & Swahnberg, K. (2023). Women's Social Mobility and Attitudinal Acceptance of Wife Abuse: A Cross-Sectional Study Among Bengali, Santal, and Garo Ethnic Communities in Rural Bangladesh. Journal of Interpersonal Violence
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Women's Social Mobility and Attitudinal Acceptance of Wife Abuse: A Cross-Sectional Study Among Bengali, Santal, and Garo Ethnic Communities in Rural Bangladesh
2023 (English)In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Previous studies exploring the influential factors associated with attitudinal acceptance of wife abuse (AAWA) did not widely focus on the relation between women's social mobility (WSM) and different dimensions of AAWA in rural Bangladesh. This current study examined the association between WSM and different dimensions of AAWA in the context of socio-cultural differences among the Bengali, the Santal, and the Garo ethnic communities in rural Bangladesh. Adopting a cross-sectional design, 1,929 married men and women were randomly included in the study from 8 Bengali, 8 Santal, and 8 Garo villages where 50.2% were women and 49.8% were men. Of the sample, 33.2% Garo, 33.2% Santal, and 33.6% Bengali participants were included in this study. Data revealed that 45.5% of women had low social mobility and the prevalence of different dimensions of AAWA was high and varied among the study communities. We used descriptive statistics, chi-square, and binary logistic regression analysis to estimate the association. The multivariate binary logistic regression analysis results revealed that the likelihood of attitudinal acceptance of overall abuse, psychological abuse, physical abuse, abuse on disobeying family obligation, and abuse on challenging male authority were significantly lower for the respondents who belonged to families where women enjoyed high mobility compared to those who belonged to families where WSM was low. This study also showed that the Bengali and the Santal participants were more likely to accept different dimensions of AAWA compared to the Garos. This study suggests that WSM should be considered in policy-making and implementing interventions to reduce the different dimensions of AAWA in rural Bangladesh.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
mobility, attitude, acceptance of wife abuse, abuse, rural, Bangladesh
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-125903 (URN)10.1177/08862605231209994 (DOI)001098497100001 ()37937750 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85176595462 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-12-07 Created: 2023-12-07 Last updated: 2023-12-07
Dahal, P., Joshi, S. K. & Swahnberg, K. (2022). A qualitative study on gender inequality and gender-based violence in Nepal. BMC Public Health, 22(1), Article ID 2005.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A qualitative study on gender inequality and gender-based violence in Nepal
2022 (English)In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 2005Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Gender inequality and violence are not mutually exclusive phenomena but complex loops affecting each other. Women in Nepal face several inequalities and violence. The causes are diverse, but most of these results are due to socially assigned lower positioning of women. The hierarchies based on power make women face subordination and violence in Nepal. The study aims to explore participants' understanding and experience to identify the status of inequality for women and how violence emerges as one of its consequences. Furthermore, it explores the causes of sex trafficking as an example of an outcome of inequality and violence. Method The study formulated separate male and female groups using a purposive sampling method. The study used a multistage focus group discussion, where the same groups met at different intervals. Six focus group discussions, three times each with male and female groups, were conducted in a year. Thirty-six individuals, including sixteen males and twenty females, were involved in the discussions. The study used constructivist grounded theory for the data analysis. Results The study participants identify that a power play between men and women reinforce inequality and increases the likelihood of violence for women. The findings suggest that the subjugation of women occurs due to practices based on gender differences, constricted life opportunities, and internalization of constructed differences among women. The study identifies that interpersonal and socio-cultural violence can result due to established differences between men and women. Sex trafficking, as an example of the outcome of inequality and violence, occurs due to the disadvantageous position of women compounded by poverty and illiteracy. The study has developed a concept of power-play which is identified as a cause and consequence of women's subordination and violence. This power play is found operative at various levels with social approval for men to use violence and maintain/produce inequality. Conclusion The theoretical concept of power play shows that there are inequitable power relations between men and women. The male-centric socio-cultural norms and practices have endowed men with privilege, power, and an opportunity to exploit women. This lowers the status of women and the power-play help to produce and sustain inequality. The power-play exposes women to violence and manifests itself as one of the worst expressions used by men.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2022
Keywords
Gender, Inequality, Violence, Power play, Constructivist grounded theory, Nepal
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-117754 (URN)10.1186/s12889-022-14389-x (DOI)000877702300001 ()36320057 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85141052075 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-12-06 Created: 2022-12-06 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Simmons, J. & Swahnberg, K. (2022). Characteristics Associated With Being Asked About Violence Victimization in Health Care: A Swedish Random Population Study. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 37(11-12), NP8479-NP8506
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characteristics Associated With Being Asked About Violence Victimization in Health Care: A Swedish Random Population Study
2022 (English)In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518, Vol. 37, no 11-12, p. NP8479-NP8506Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recommendations to routinely question patients about violence victimization have been around for many years; nonetheless, many patients suffering in the aftermath of violence go unnoticed in health care. The main aim of this study was to explore characteristics associated with being asked about experiences of violence in health care and thereby making visible victims that go unnoticed. In this study, we used cross-sectional survey data from 754 men (response rate 35%) and 749 women (response rate 38%) collected at random from the Swedish population, age 25–85. Questions were asked about experiences of emotional, physical, and sexual violence from both family, partner, and other perpetrators. Only 13.1% of those reporting some form of victimization reported ever being asked about experiences of violence in health care. Low subjective social status was associated with being asked questions (adj OR 2.23) but not with victimization, possibly indicating prejudice believes among providers concerning who can be a victim of violence. Other factors associated with increased odds of being asked questions were: being a woman (adj OR 2.09), young age (24–44 years, adj OR 6.90), having been treated for depression (adj OR 2.45) or depression and anxiety (adj OR 2.19) as well as reporting physical violence (adj OR 2.74) or polyvictimization (adj OR 2.85). The main finding of the study was that only few victims had been asked questions. For example, among those reporting ≥4 visits to a primary care physician during the past 12 months, 43% reported some form of victimization but only 6% had been asked questions. Our findings underline the importance of continuing to improve the health care response offered to victims of violence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2022
Keywords
disclosure of domestic violence, domestic violence, revictimization, sexual assault, violence exposure, adult, anxiety, article, controlled study, exposure to violence, female, general practitioner, human, major clinical study, male, offender, physical violence, population research, prejudice, social status, Swedish citizen, victim
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-102369 (URN)10.1177/0886260520977836 (DOI)000677301600001 ()33283603 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85097284520 (Scopus ID)2020 (Local ID)2020 (Archive number)2020 (OAI)
Available from: 2021-04-21 Created: 2021-04-21 Last updated: 2022-07-15Bibliographically approved
Dahal, P., Joshi, S. K. & Swahnberg, K. (2022). Does Forum Theater Help Reduce Gender Inequalities and Violence? Findings From Nepal. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 37(13-14), NP12086-NP12110
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does Forum Theater Help Reduce Gender Inequalities and Violence? Findings From Nepal
2022 (English)In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518, Vol. 37, no 13-14, p. NP12086-NP12110Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Gender inequality and violence against women are present in every society and culture around the world. The intensities vary, however, based on the local guiding norms and established belief systems. The society of Nepal is centered on traditional belief systems of gender roles and responsibilities, providing greater male supremacy and subordination for the females. This has led to the development and extensive practices of social gender hierarchal systems, producing several inequalities and violence toward women. This study has utilized Forum Theater interventions as a method of raising awareness in 10 villages in eastern Nepal. The study aimed to understand the perception and changes in the community and individuals from the interactive Forum Theater performances on pertinent local gender issues. We conducted 6 focus group discussions and 30 individual interviews with male and female participants exposed to the interventions. The data analysis utilized the constructivist grounded theory methodology. The study finds that exposure and interactive participation in the Forum Theater provide the audience with knowledge, develop empathy toward the victim, and motivate them to change the situation of inequality, abuse, and violence using dialogues and negotiations. The study describes how participation in Forum Theater has increased individual’s ability for negotiating changes. The engagement by the audience in community discussions and replication of efforts in one of the intervention sites show the level of preparedness and ownership among the targeted communities. The study shows the methodological aspects of the planning and performance of the Forum Theater and recommends further exploration of the use of Forum Theater in raising awareness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2022
Keywords
Cultural contexts, Domestic violence, Intervention/treatment, Prevention, Sexual assault
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-105955 (URN)10.1177/0886260521997457 (DOI)000677313000001 ()33663256 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85102110415 (Scopus ID)2021 (Local ID)2021 (Archive number)2021 (OAI)
Available from: 2021-07-15 Created: 2021-07-15 Last updated: 2022-07-15Bibliographically approved
Ludvigsson, M., Wiklund, N., Swahnberg, K. & Simmons, J. (2022). Experiences of elder abuse: a qualitative study among victims in Sweden. BMC Geriatrics, 22(1), Article ID 256.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of elder abuse: a qualitative study among victims in Sweden
2022 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 256Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Elder abuse is underreported and undertreated. Methods for prevention and intervention are being developed, but the knowledge guiding such measures is often insufficiently based on the victims’ own voices due to a paucity of studies. The aim of this study was therefore to explore experiences of elder abuse among the victims themselves.

Methods

Consecutive inpatients ≥ 65 years of age at a hospital clinic in Sweden were invited to participate, and 24 victims of elder abuse were identified. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted, and transcripts were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

Results

The analysis generated four themes that together give a comprehensive picture of elder abuse from the participants’ subjective perspectives. The participants’ experiences of abuse were similar to previous third-party descriptions of elder abuse and to descriptions of abuse among younger adults, but certain aspects were substantially different. Vulnerability due to aging and diseases led to dependance on others and reduced autonomy. Rich descriptions were conveyed of neglect, psychological abuse, and other types of abuse in the contexts of both care services and family relations.

Conclusions

Elder abuse is often associated with an individual vulnerability mix of the aging body, illnesses, and help dependence in connection with dysfunctional surroundings. As individual differences of vulnerability, exposure to violence, and associated consequences were so clear, this implies that components of prevention and intervention should be individually tailored to match the needs and preferences of older victims.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2022
Keywords
Aged, Neglect, Mistreatment, Ageism, Violence
National Category
Nursing Social Work
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-111486 (URN)10.1186/s12877-022-02933-8 (DOI)000774865700002 ()35351038 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85127233142 (Scopus ID)2022 (Local ID)2022 (Archive number)2022 (OAI)
Available from: 2022-04-20 Created: 2022-04-20 Last updated: 2022-04-27Bibliographically approved
Perera, D., Munas, M., Swahnberg, K., Wijewardene, K. & Infanti, J. J. (2022). Obstetric Violence Is Prevalent in Routine Maternity Care: A Cross-Sectional Study of Obstetric Violence and Its Associated Factors among Pregnant Women in Sri Lanka's Colombo District. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 19(16), Article ID 9997.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Obstetric Violence Is Prevalent in Routine Maternity Care: A Cross-Sectional Study of Obstetric Violence and Its Associated Factors among Pregnant Women in Sri Lanka's Colombo District
Show others...
2022 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 16, article id 9997Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The phenomenon of obstetric violence has been documented widely in maternity care settings worldwide, with scholars arguing that it is a persistent, common, but preventable impediment to attaining dignified health care. However, gaps remain in understanding local expressions of the phenomenon, associations with other types of violence against women, and implications for women's trust and confidence in health providers and services. We focused on these issues in this cross-sectional study of 1314 women in Sri Lanka's Colombo district. Specifically, in this study, we used Sinhalese and Tamil translations of the NorVold Abuse Questionnaire and the Abuse Assessment Screen to measure prevalence of women's experiences with obstetric violence in maternity care and lifetime and pregnancy-specific domestic violence. Then, the results were interpreted by considering the women's sociodemographic characteristics, such as age, ethnicity, and family income, to reveal previously undocumented associations between obstetric and domestic violence during pregnancy, as well as other factors associated with experiencing obstetric violence. We argue that obstetric violence is prevalent in government-sector (public) maternity care facilities in the Colombo district and is associated with young age, lower family income, non-majority ethnicity, and rural residency. Significantly, this study sheds light on a serious concern that has been underexamined, wherein women who report experiencing obstetric violence are also less likely to be asked by a health care provider about domestic violence experiences. Further research at the clinical level needs to focus on appropriate training and interventions to ensure women's safety and cultivate relationships between patients and health care providers characterized by trust, confidence, and respect.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
Keywords
obstetric violence, domestic violence, maternity care, Sri Lanka, prevalence study, vulnerable populations
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-116447 (URN)10.3390/ijerph19169997 (DOI)000845751000001 ()36011635 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85136663014 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-09-20 Created: 2022-09-20 Last updated: 2022-10-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5200-1740

Search in DiVA

Show all publications