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Tamburino, L., Bravo, G., Clough, Y. & Nicholas, K. A. (2020). From population to production: 50 years of scientific literature on how to feed the world. Global Food Security, 24, 1-8, Article ID 100346.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From population to production: 50 years of scientific literature on how to feed the world
2020 (English)In: Global Food Security, E-ISSN 2211-9124, Vol. 24, p. 1-8, article id 100346Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How to feed the world is a vigorously debated question, but the extent to which possible solutions receive attention in the scientific literature has not been studied. Using textual analysis, we analyse 12,640 research articles to quantify how this discourse evolved over the last 50 years, distinguishing between a focus on three potential levers: total food production, per capita food demand, and population. We find a strong and increasing focus on feeding the world through increasing food production via technology, while the focus on reducing food demand through less intensive dietary patterns has remained constant and low. Population has declined from being the dominant lever discussed in 1969 to the least researched in 2018. Our results suggest that very few studies address all three levers in an integrated way, which may be constraining the solution space for feeding the world and meeting other Sustainable Development Goals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-90663 (URN)10.1016/j.gfs.2019.100346 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-12-26 Created: 2019-12-26 Last updated: 2020-01-15Bibliographically approved
de Moor, T., Farjam, M., Bravo, G., Dehkordi, M., Forsman, A., Ghorbani, A. & van Weeren, R. (2019). Common paths in long-term institutional dynamics: An analysis of rule changes in British and Dutch commons over seven centuries. In: Presented at: XVII Biennial IASC Conference, Lima, Peru, July 1-5, 2019: . Paper presented at XVII Biennial IASC Conference 'In Defense of the Commons: Challenges, Innovation, and Action', Lima, Peru, July 1-5, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Common paths in long-term institutional dynamics: An analysis of rule changes in British and Dutch commons over seven centuries
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2019 (English)In: Presented at: XVII Biennial IASC Conference, Lima, Peru, July 1-5, 2019, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-89457 (URN)
Conference
XVII Biennial IASC Conference 'In Defense of the Commons: Challenges, Innovation, and Action', Lima, Peru, July 1-5, 2019
Available from: 2019-10-04 Created: 2019-10-04 Last updated: 2019-11-20Bibliographically approved
Farjam, M., Bravo, G., Forsman, A., de Moor, T., Ghorbani, A., Dehkordi, M. & van Weeren, R. (2019). Eco-evolutionary perspectives on institutional dynamics of historical commons advice about sustainable utilization of shared resources. In: Presented at: XVII Biennial IASC Conference, Lima, Peru, July 1-5, 2019: . Paper presented at XVII Biennial IASC Conference 'In Defense of the Commons: Challenges, Innovation, and Action', Lima, Peru, July 1-5, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eco-evolutionary perspectives on institutional dynamics of historical commons advice about sustainable utilization of shared resources
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2019 (English)In: Presented at: XVII Biennial IASC Conference, Lima, Peru, July 1-5, 2019, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-89456 (URN)
Conference
XVII Biennial IASC Conference 'In Defense of the Commons: Challenges, Innovation, and Action', Lima, Peru, July 1-5, 2019
Available from: 2019-10-04 Created: 2019-10-04 Last updated: 2019-11-20Bibliographically approved
Farjam, M., Nikolaychuk, O. & Bravo, G. (2019). Experimental evidence of an attitude-behaviour gap for climate change mitigation in high cost conditions. In: Presented at 6th International Meeting on Experimental and Behavioral Social Sciences (IMEBESS), Utrecht, May 2-4, 2019.: . Paper presented at 6th International Meeting on Experimental and Behavioral Social Sciences (IMEBESS), Utrecht, May 2-4, 2019..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimental evidence of an attitude-behaviour gap for climate change mitigation in high cost conditions
2019 (English)In: Presented at 6th International Meeting on Experimental and Behavioral Social Sciences (IMEBESS), Utrecht, May 2-4, 2019., 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

An established research result is that people's environmental attitudes only loosely translate into actions effectively reducing their environmental impact, something known as the attitude-behaviour gap. On the other hand, correct information and environmental education are often considered a key to promote sustainability, which raises the question of when attitudes can actually work as a lever to promote environmental objectives and, conversely, when other factors have a better chance to succeed. To answer these questions, we tested the effect of environmental attitudes in an online experiment with real money at stake and real-world climate mitigation consequences. We found that environmental attitudes mainly affected behaviour in a low cost situation, while their effect was reduced when the stakes were higher. This finding is consistent with the low cost hypothesis of environmental behaviour and has important consequences for the shaping of more effective climate policies in a democratic context.

Keywords
environmental behaviour, low-cost hypothesis, climate change, collective-risk social dilemma
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-82569 (URN)
Conference
6th International Meeting on Experimental and Behavioral Social Sciences (IMEBESS), Utrecht, May 2-4, 2019.
Available from: 2019-05-15 Created: 2019-05-15 Last updated: 2019-11-19Bibliographically approved
Farjam, M., Nikolaychuk, O. & Bravo, G. (2019). Experimental evidence of an environmental attitude-behavior gap in high-cost situations. Ecological Economics, 166, 1-12, Article ID 106434.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimental evidence of an environmental attitude-behavior gap in high-cost situations
2019 (English)In: Ecological Economics, ISSN 0921-8009, E-ISSN 1873-6106, Vol. 166, p. 1-12, article id 106434Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

So far, there has been mixed evidence in the literature regarding the relationship between environmental attitudes and actual `green' actions, something known as the attitude-behavior gap. This raises the question of when attitudes can actually work as a lever to promote environmental objectives, such as climate change mitigation, and, conversely, when other factors would be more effective. This paper presents an online experiment with real money at stake and real-world consequences designed to test the effect of environmental attitudes on behavior under various conditions. We found that environmental attitudes affected behavior only in low-cost situations. This finding is consistent with the low-cost hypothesis of environmental behavior postulating that concerned individuals will undertake low-cost actions in order to reduce the cognitive dissonance  between their attitudes and rational realization of the environmental impact of their behavior but avoid higher-cost actions despite their greater potential as far as environmental protection. This finding has important consequences for the design of more effective climate policies in a democratic context as it puts limits on what can be achieved by raising environmental concern alone.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Climate change mitigation, Low-cost hypothesis, Online experiment, Collective-risk social dilemma
National Category
Economics Climate Research
Research subject
Economy, Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-88153 (URN)10.1016/j.ecolecon.2019.106434 (DOI)000488318100006 ()
Available from: 2019-08-21 Created: 2019-08-21 Last updated: 2019-10-18Bibliographically approved
Natalini, D., Bravo, G. & Jones, A. W. (2019). Global food security and food riots: an agent-based modelling approach. Food Security, 11(5), 1153-1173
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global food security and food riots: an agent-based modelling approach
2019 (English)In: Food Security, ISSN 1876-4517, E-ISSN 1876-4525, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 1153-1173Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Due to negative consequences of climate change for agriculture and food production shocks affecting different areas of the world, the past two decades saw the conditions of global food security increasingly worsen. This has resulted in negative consequences for the world economy, partly causing international food price spikes and social upheavals. In this paper we present statistical findings along with a preliminary version of an original agent-based model called the Dawe Global Security Model that simulates the global food market and the political fragility of countries. The model simulates the effects of food insecurity on international food prices and how these, coupled with national political fragility and international food trade can, in turn, increase the probability of food riots in countries. The agents in the model are the 213 countries of the world whose characteristics reflect empirical data and the international trade of food is also simulated based on real trade partnerships and data. The model has been informed, calibrated and validated using real data and the results of these procedures are presented in the paper. To further test the model we also present the model’s forecasts for the near future in terms of food prices and incidence of food riots. The Dawe Global Security Model can be used to test scenarios on the evolution of shocks to global food production and analyse consequences for food riots. Further developments of the model can include national responses to food crises to investigate how countries can influence the spread of global food crises.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
food security, agent-based model, food riots, fragility, forecast, international trade
National Category
Globalisation Studies
Research subject
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-68587 (URN)10.1007/s12571-017-0693-z (DOI)000486234500011 ()
Available from: 2017-11-09 Created: 2017-11-09 Last updated: 2019-10-03Bibliographically approved
Farjam, M., Nikolaychuk, O. & Bravo, G. (2019). Investing into climate change mitigation despite the risk of failure. Climatic Change, 154(3-4), 453-460
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investing into climate change mitigation despite the risk of failure
2019 (English)In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 154, no 3-4, p. 453-460Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In order to convince both policy makers and the general public to engage in climate change mitigation activities, it is crucial to communicate the inherent risks in an effective way. Due to the complexity of the system, mitigation activities cannot completely rule out the possibility of the climate reaching a dangerous tipping point but can only reduce it to some unavoidable residual risk level. We present an online experiment based on a sample of US citizens and designed to improve our understanding of how the presence of such residual risk affects the willingness to invest into climate change mitigation. We found that, far from reducing them, the presence of residual risk actually increases investments into mitigation activities. This result suggests that scientists and policy makers should consider being more transparent about communicating the residual risks entailed by such initiatives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
National Category
Climate Research
Research subject
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-82572 (URN)10.1007/s10584-019-02454-1 (DOI)000472894800010 ()2-s2.0-85065714889 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-15 Created: 2019-05-15 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Ghorbani, A., Dehkordi, M., Bravo, G., Farjam, M., De Moor, T. & van Weeren, R. (2019). Long-term Dynamics of Institutions: An empirically tested model. In: : . Paper presented at Social Simulation Conference 2019, Mainz, Germany, 23-27 September, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term Dynamics of Institutions: An empirically tested model
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2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-89401 (URN)
Conference
Social Simulation Conference 2019, Mainz, Germany, 23-27 September, 2019
Note

Ej belagd 20191120

Available from: 2019-10-03 Created: 2019-10-03 Last updated: 2019-11-20Bibliographically approved
Farjam, M., Nikolaychuk, O. & Bravo, G. (2019). Nonetheless or all the more? Investing into climate change mitigation policies despitea risk of failure. In: : . Paper presented at 2019 ESA (Economic Science Association) World Meeting, Vancouver, Canada, July 4-7, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nonetheless or all the more? Investing into climate change mitigation policies despitea risk of failure
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Economics Sociology
Research subject
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-89459 (URN)
Conference
2019 ESA (Economic Science Association) World Meeting, Vancouver, Canada, July 4-7, 2019
Note

Ej belagd 20191120

Available from: 2019-10-04 Created: 2019-10-04 Last updated: 2019-11-20Bibliographically approved
Bravo, G., Pardalis, G., Mahapatra, K. & Mainali, B. (2019). Physical vs. Aesthetic Renovations: Learning from Swedish House Owners. Buildings, 9(1), Article ID 12.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical vs. Aesthetic Renovations: Learning from Swedish House Owners
2019 (English)In: Buildings, ISSN 2075-5309, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we identify the socio-economic attributes and attitudes that have influencedhouse owners in renovating their homes in the past. Our study is based on responses to an onlinequestionnaire survey of 971 house owners living in Kronoberg County in Sweden. Results showedthat the interest and willingness of the house owners to perform a renovation varied dependingon their demographic background and the age of the house. The latter positively affected pastrenovations, only when combined with the residence time. Furthermore, the age of house ownersstrongly and positively affected the probability of performing aesthetic type of renovations, becauseof a long time of residence in the house. Younger, town living, and highly educated house ownersseem to be more concerned regarding saving energy, which motivated them to perform physicalrenovations on their house. Our results also suggest that income, level of education, and place ofresidence have an effect on renovation decisions only through their effect on the energy concern ofhouse owners, and a varied effect on renovation decisions, when combined with the time of residencein the house.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
house owners, renovations, physical renovations, aesthetic renovations, decision-making
National Category
Energy Systems Environmental Management
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Sustainable Built Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-79411 (URN)10.3390/buildings9010012 (DOI)000457159600017 ()2-s2.0-85059532629 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Kamprad Family Foundation
Available from: 2019-01-09 Created: 2019-01-09 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2837-0137

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