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Pemunta, Ngambouk Vitalis, DrORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4505-1683
Publications (10 of 35) Show all publications
Pemunta, N. V. (2019). Fortress conservation, wildlife legislation and the Baka Pygmies of southeast Cameroon. GeoJournal, 84(4), 1035-1055
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fortress conservation, wildlife legislation and the Baka Pygmies of southeast Cameroon
2019 (English)In: GeoJournal, ISSN 0343-2521, E-ISSN 1572-9893, Vol. 84, no 4, p. 1035-1055Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The indigenous Baka Pygmies of southeast Cameroon depend mainly on environmental incomes for their livelihoods, usually hunting and gathering and the sustainable use of their ecological systems. They are at the verge of profound political, socioeconomic, and environmental transformations orchestrated by modern state laws regulating hunting and international development actors and agencies whose development vision expressed through conservation often underlie a contradiction with their way of life. This ethnographic study aims to document the dynamics of the institution of the great hunting expedition among the Baka. An interplay between the overexploitation of forestry resources, the creation of protected areas (fortress conservation), the full protection of certain classes of large mammals, the use of specific tools forbidden by existing forestry legislation and the ruthless behaviour of ‘eco-guards’ have led to changes in the organization of the great hunting expedition. To better address the socio-cultural aspects of biodiversity conservation and consequently strengthen the legislation regulating the wildlife sector in the country, conservation stakeholders must be conscious of the multiple entanglements between human and other life forms and the ecology of hunting. This suggests the need for a rights-based approach to conservation that recognizes the entanglement of ‘multispecies assemblages’ and respects indigenous land rights.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Indigenous conservation, Sustainable development, Forestry regulation, Ecology of hunting, Multispecies assemblages, Pygmies, Indigenous land rights, Cameroon, Socioeconomic livelihood
National Category
Economic Geography
Research subject
Humanities, Cultural Sociology; Economy, Cultural Economy; Natural Science, Ecology; Social Sciences, Peace and Development Studies; Environmental Science, Natural Resources Management; Social Sciences, Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-82363 (URN)10.1007/s10708-018-9906-z (DOI)000476495300014 ()2-s2.0-85050672074 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-29 Created: 2019-04-29 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Pemunta, N. V. (Ed.). (2018). Concurrences in Postcolonial Research: Perspectives, Methodologies, and Engagements. Stuttgart: Ibidem-Verlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Concurrences in Postcolonial Research: Perspectives, Methodologies, and Engagements
2018 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The concept of concurrences is a blanket term for challenging dominating statements of the past and present. Concurrent stories have varying claims to reality and fiction, as well as different, diverging, and at times competing claims to society, culture, identity, and historical past. Dominant Western narrations about colonial power relationships are challenged by alternative sources such as heritage objects and oral traditions, enabling the voice of minorities or subaltern groups to be heard. Concurrences in Postcolonial Research is about capturing multiple voices and multiple temporalities. As such, it is both a relational and dynamic methodology and a theoretical perspective that undergirds the multiple workings of power, uncovering asymmetrical power relations. Interdisciplinary in nature, this anthology is the outcome of scholarship from the humanities and social sciences with an interest in the multiple temporality of postcolonial issues and engagements in various places across the world.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stuttgart: Ibidem-Verlag, 2018. p. 351
Series
Beyond the Social Sciences, ISSN 2364-8775 ; 6
Keywords
Concurrences, Postcolonial studies, domination, power, knowledge
National Category
Gender Studies Literary Composition Cultural Studies
Research subject
Social Sciences, Gender Studies; Humanities, Cultural Sociology; Humanities, Creative writing; Economy, Cultural Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-75448 (URN)978-3-8382-1154-1 (ISBN)9783838271545 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-06-10 Created: 2018-06-10 Last updated: 2019-06-26Bibliographically approved
Pemunta, N. V. (2018). Homosexuality as ''UnAfrican'': Heteronormativity, Power, and Ambivalence in Cameroon. In: Ngambouk Vitalis Pemunta (Ed.), Concurrences in Postcolonial Research: Perspectives, Methodologies, and Engagements (pp. 125-174). Stuttgart: Ibidem-Verlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Homosexuality as ''UnAfrican'': Heteronormativity, Power, and Ambivalence in Cameroon
2018 (English)In: Concurrences in Postcolonial Research: Perspectives, Methodologies, and Engagements / [ed] Ngambouk Vitalis Pemunta, Stuttgart: Ibidem-Verlag, 2018, p. 125-174Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In 2006, Cameroon was rocked by an anti-gay crusade when some tabloids beamed their searchlight on more than 50 of the country´s prominent figures for homosexuality. The denunciation campaign against homosexuality set in motion a furious national debate on gay rights in the country. This paper examines the Cameroon government´s ambivalence to LGBT relationships and the simultaneous entanglement of same-sex relationships with power and social mobility. Same-sex relationships involving the powerful, is part of human rights—“the right to a private life”. However, when it involves the poor, it is criminalized, and considered as a threat to national identity and sovereignty. Homosexual relationships by the former are reportedly intertwined with occultic powers and serve as a gateway to social mobility in the country´s sociopolitical landscape. Framed in terms of African nationalism—a national identity inscribed on women´s bodies since they are charged with biological reproduction, the public resistance of Cameroon´s leaders to same-sex relationships is a veil to produce a counter hegemonic discourse against the perceived intrusion of western values as well as to deflect Western attention from profligacy, human rights violations, long stays in power, and unbridled corruption. Cast against the anti-democracy discourse of the 1990s, the anti-same-sex discourse feeds into larger narratives about resistance to perceived western values and the double appropriation of political homophobia by various social actors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stuttgart: Ibidem-Verlag, 2018
Series
Beyond the Social Sciences, ISSN 2364-8775 ; 6
Keywords
same-sex relationships, homosexuality, magic ritual practices, politics, human rights violations, political homophobia
National Category
Gender Studies Political Science
Research subject
Economy, Cultural Economy; Humanities, Cultural Sociology; Social Sciences, Gender Studies; Social Sciences, Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-75712 (URN)978-3-8382-1154-1 (ISBN)9783838271545 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-06-13 Created: 2018-06-13 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved
Pemunta, N. V. (2018). The logic of benevolent capitalism: the duplicity of Sithe Global Sustainable Oils Cameroon land grab and deforestation scheme as sustainable investment. International Journal of Global Environmental Issues, 17(1), 80-109
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The logic of benevolent capitalism: the duplicity of Sithe Global Sustainable Oils Cameroon land grab and deforestation scheme as sustainable investment
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Global Environmental Issues, ISSN 1466-6650, E-ISSN 1741-5136, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 80-109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This ethnographic study documents the concurrent debates pitting neoliberal ideology promoting economic growth and the generation of employment opportunities championed by the agro-industrial giant Herakles Farms, alongside the World Bank and the government of Cameroon - inherent in the establishment of a 73,086 ha oil palm plantation in Southwest Cameroon against the need for sustainable environment advocated for by local communities, NGOs and their transnational allies. Claims of benevolent capitalism are at odds with the perception and experiences of home loss and environmental degradation orchestrated by this project. The dissonance between the discourses and claims of benevolent capitalism with the perception and experiences of home loss and environmental degradation orchestrated by this project demonstrates that the neoliberal discourse of capitalist benevolence is a self-interested discourse that benefits the powerful at the expense of the subaltern. Local people should be empowered to negotiate with multinational corporations, laws recognising customary land rights instituted and implemented.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
InderScience Publishers, 2018
Keywords
sustainable development, environmental governance, neoliberalism, discourse, development, Africa, oil palm, land tenure, Cameroon, benevolent capitalism, deforestation, environmental degradation, Sithe Global Sustainable Oils Cameroon, Herakles Farm, land grab
National Category
Environmental Sciences Cultural Studies
Research subject
Humanities, Cultural Sociology; Environmental Science, Natural Resources Management; Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-75447 (URN)10.1504/IJGENVI.2018.090655 (DOI)2-s2.0-85044673672 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-10 Created: 2018-06-10 Last updated: 2019-08-28Bibliographically approved
Heward-Mills, N. L., Atuhaire, C., Spoors, C., Pemunta, N. V., Priebe, G. & Cumber, S. N. (2018). The role of faith leaders in influencing health behaviour: a qualitative exploration on the views of Black African Christians in Leeds, United Kingdom. Pan African Medical Journal, 30, Article ID 199.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of faith leaders in influencing health behaviour: a qualitative exploration on the views of Black African Christians in Leeds, United Kingdom
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Pan African Medical Journal, ISSN 1937-8688, E-ISSN 1937-8688, Vol. 30, article id 199Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Black African communities in the U.K suffer from health disparities compared to the general population. This has been attributed to the lack of culturally sensitive interventions that are meaningful to them. Faith leaders are an integral part of the community and are known to have immense influence on health behaviour of congregants and community members. However, their role in health behaviour change (alcohol and tobacco use) has been largely neglected. The aim of this study is to explore the views of Black African Christians on the role of their faith leaders in their health behaviour, with particular focus on the extent of influence and mechanisms that foster this. Methods: Eight (8) semi-structured interviews were conducted with Black African Christians between the ages of 25-44, from two churches in Leeds, UK. Data were analysed using the principles of thematic analysis. Results: Findings revealed that faith leaders could play a very important role in the health behaviour of their congregants. Faith leaders are able to influence health behaviour not only on the individual level but also on a socio-cultural and environmental level. They exert such influence through several mediators including through scriptural influence, social influence and by serving as a role models. However, no single mediator has been found to be exclusively associated to health behaviour change. Conclusion: Congregants view faith leaders as having an immense influence on their health behaviour. As a community resource, faith leaders could be better positioned to organize and foster community participation in health matters. Health promoters should thus consider collaborations with faith leaders to enhance the health of their community.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Pan African Medical Journal, 2018
Keywords
Faith leaders, health behavior, black Africans, health promotion
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Humanities, Cultural Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-79491 (URN)10.11604/pamj.2018.30.199.15656 (DOI)000446943100001 ()30574218 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055557051 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-15 Created: 2019-01-15 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Pemunta, N. V. (2018). Towards Global Connections and Multiple Entanglement. In: Ngambouk Vitalis Pemunta (Ed.), Concurrences in postcolonial research: perspectives, methodologies, and engagements (pp. 15-52). Stuttgart: Ibidem-Verlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards Global Connections and Multiple Entanglement
2018 (English)In: Concurrences in postcolonial research: perspectives, methodologies, and engagements / [ed] Ngambouk Vitalis Pemunta, Stuttgart: Ibidem-Verlag, 2018, p. 15-52Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

One of the central preoccupations of postcolonial studies is ‘‘to recover the voice and agency of the subaltern to find alternative articulations to monolithic imperial representations. Universalizing perspectives obscure their origins and threaten to silence alternatives, regardless of their validity or influence"(Fur et al., 2014: 1253). The methodological and theoretical process of recovering alternative voices in space and time while factoring in our conflicting analysis claims regarding culture, history and identity is no easy feat.  The difficulties are because either one individual academic discipline or grand theory can fruitfully explain concurrent encounters. This difficulty is rather an invitation to open our eyes to the permeability of academic disciplines, concepts and methods as captured by the idea of ‘‘travelling concepts". 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stuttgart: Ibidem-Verlag, 2018
Series
Beyond the Social Sciences, ISSN 2364-8775 ; 6
Keywords
global history, global interconnections, interdisciplinarity, concurrences, postcolonial studies
National Category
Sociology Human Geography
Research subject
Economy, Cultural Economy; Humanities, Cultural Sociology; Social Sciences, Sociology; Social Sciences, Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-75709 (URN)978-3-8382-1154-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-06-13 Created: 2018-06-13 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved
Pemunta, N. V. & Tabenyang, C.-J. (2017). Cultural power, ritual symbolism and human rights violations in Sierra Leone. Cogent Social Sciences, 1-27, Article ID 1295549.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cultural power, ritual symbolism and human rights violations in Sierra Leone
2017 (English)In: Cogent Social Sciences, E-ISSN 2331-1886, p. 1-27, article id 1295549Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper explores the links between the socio-cultural power structures of the Poro and Bondo secret societies and their interactions with internationalist human rights discourse in postconflict Sierra Leone. It argues that these secret societies offer gendered and cultural spaces that serve as social and political mobilizing symbols. These societies further provide forums as well as a stage for counter-discourses about gender-based violence and human rights violations, particularly with regards to the campaign against female circumcision. The paper concludes that despite internal tensions and squabbles, the Bondo secret societiy has gained most of its present-day solidarity by broadly disseminating to both members and non-members the highly charged narrative that the society’s exposure leads to its destruction. The Bondo society has been able to maintain cohesion and defend its interests by appropriating and invoking traditional knowledge and ritual codes.This paper explores the links between the socio-cultural power structures of the Poro and Bondo secret societies and their interactions with internationalist human rights discourse in postconflict Sierra Leone. It argues that these secret societies offer gendered and cultural spaces that serve as social and political mobilizing symbols. These societies further provide forums as well as a stage for counter-discourses about gender-based violence and human rights violations, particularly with regards to the campaign against female circumcision. The paper concludes that despite internal tensions and squabbles, the Bondo secret societiy has gained most of its present-day solidarity by broadly disseminating to both members and non-members the highly charged narrative that the society’s exposure leads to its destruction. The Bondo society has been able to maintain cohesion and defend its interests by appropriating and invoking traditional knowledge and ritual codes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
United Kingdom: Taylor & Francis Group, 2017
Keywords
postconflict, secret society, female circumcision, tradition, modernity
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Computer and Information Sciences Computer Science, Media Technology; Economy, Cultural Economy; Social Sciences, Gender Studies; Social Sciences, Political Science; Social Sciences, Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-61718 (URN)10.1080/23311886.2017.1295549 (DOI)000395701100001 ()2-s2.0-85051437620 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-03-26 Created: 2017-03-26 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Pemunta, N. V. (2017). When ‘property cannot own property’: women’s lack of property rights in Cameroon. Paper presented at International Conference on Humanities and Social Sciences, Perspectives on Gender in a Global World: Interdisciplinary Perspectives, University of South-East Europe, Bucharest, Romania, 14–16 May 2015.. African Journal of Economic and Sustainable Development, 6(1), 67-85
Open this publication in new window or tab >>When ‘property cannot own property’: women’s lack of property rights in Cameroon
2017 (English)In: African Journal of Economic and Sustainable Development, ISSN 2046-4770, E-ISSN 2046-4789, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 67-85Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In most of Africa, women constitute the majority of small holder farmers. They are overwhelmingly involved in food production on land leased to them or acquired through family bonds or purchase. This paper examines how the institution of customary marriage connives with Cameroon's gender neutral statutory land tenure legislation to deprive women of access to land. Additionally, the bureaucratic land registration procedure, the gendering of the land tenure legislation, the skewing of the Land Consultative Board in men's favour and farmer/grazer conflicts further undermine women's land rights. To ensure women's collective wellbeing and socioeconomic progress, gender-sensitive, rather than gender-neutral policies are recommended.In most of Africa, women constitute the majority of small holder farmers. They are overwhelmingly involved in food production on land leased to them or acquired through family bonds or purchase. This paper examines how the institution of customary marriage connives with Cameroon's gender neutral statutory land tenure legislation to deprive women of access to land. Additionally, the bureaucratic land registration procedure, the gendering of the land tenure legislation, the skewing of the Land Consultative Board in men's favour and farmer/grazer conflicts further undermine women's land rights. To ensure women's collective wellbeing and socioeconomic progress, gender-sensitive, rather than gender-neutral policies are recommended.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
InderScience Publishers, 2017
Keywords
women's rights, land rights, small holder farming, farmer-grazer conflicts, gender, socio-economic development, female rights, property rights, Cameroon, farmers, grazers, customary marriage, land tenure legislation, grazing, gender-sensitive policies, gender-neutral policies
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Economy, Cultural Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-61719 (URN)10.1504/AJESD.2017.10003657 (DOI)
Conference
International Conference on Humanities and Social Sciences, Perspectives on Gender in a Global World: Interdisciplinary Perspectives, University of South-East Europe, Bucharest, Romania, 14–16 May 2015.
Available from: 2017-03-26 Created: 2017-03-26 Last updated: 2019-09-05Bibliographically approved
Pemunta, N. V. & Tabenyang, C. J. (2016). From hope to dystopia: Concurrent discourses of petro-dollar inspired-development in Chad. International Journal of Development Issues, 15(1), 35-50
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From hope to dystopia: Concurrent discourses of petro-dollar inspired-development in Chad
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Development Issues, ISSN 1446-8956, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 35-50Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the dark flip side of the heightened dreams and wild expectations of development as a bright picture that accompanied the discovery of petroleum in politically unstable and donor-dependent Chad.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were elicited through local-level ethnography–participant observation, individual surveys and focus group discussion sessions with stakeholders on the impact of the Chad–Cameroon pipeline and petroleum development project.

Findings

While the “discourse of development” is about a better and new future, this new future, however, has a dark side: un/under-development, “backwardness”, corruption and patronage, leading to deeply entrenched poverty. Petroleum has become a discursive site where the competing discourses about development personified as the provision of material resources are played out.

Originality/value

The failure of petro-dollar-inspired development in Chad speaks to the mutually reinforcing nature of development decisions. Although firms need workers with specialized skills, workers will not acquire those skills in anticipation of employment opportunities. This disjuncture highlights the need for strategic complementarity in investment decision and coordination among economic agents. More than a decade later, the utopic dream of petro-dollar-inspired development as an aspiration is now characterized by a disconnect–environmental degradation, food insecurity, gendered and deeply entrenched poverty. This disjuncture demonstrates the need for a holistic impact assessment that involves different adaptive approaches and focus on a wide range of livelihood issues. Holistic evaluation on all programmes, plans, projects, policies and interventions will lead to the achievement of sustainable people-centred development that conserves the stewardship of nature.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016
Keywords
Resource curse, Capitalism, Un/under-development, Petroleum exploitation, Petro-dollars
National Category
Sociology Human Geography
Research subject
Humanities, Cultural Sociology; Environmental Science, Natural Resources Management; Humanities, Human Geography; Social Sciences; Social Sciences, Peace and Development Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-61724 (URN)10.1108/IJDI-09-2015-0056 (DOI)2-s2.0-84996636461 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-03-26 Created: 2017-03-26 Last updated: 2017-04-13Bibliographically approved
Pemunta, N. V. & Tabenyang, T.-J. C. (2016). Neoliberalism, Oil Wealth and Migrant Sex Work in the Chadian City of N’Djamena (1ed.). In: Susanne Hofmann, Adi Moreno (Ed.), Intimate Economies: Bodies, Emotions and Sexualities on the Global Market (pp. 135-162). Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neoliberalism, Oil Wealth and Migrant Sex Work in the Chadian City of N’Djamena
2016 (English)In: Intimate Economies: Bodies, Emotions and Sexualities on the Global Market / [ed] Susanne Hofmann, Adi Moreno, Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, 1, p. 135-162Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter documents the diverse motivations for entering sex work, and transnational Cameroonian sex workers’ experiences with clients in N’Djamena, the capital of Chad. It explores their sex work practices, the risks as well as the various coping strategies they have adopted to handle the neoliberal economic context in which they operate. Cameroonian sex workers in Chad have created individual innovative, entrepreneurial strategies to adapt themselves to and to cope with the neoliberal economic and political context. While a conjuncture between a lack of marketable skills and economic crises in their home countries have pushed them into the sex trade, it allows them to make sufficient money to take care of themselves and their families and bears the chance to overcome the suffering, hardship and oppression that they face in their everyday lives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Palgrave Macmillan, 2016 Edition: 1
Series
Palgrave Studies in Globalization and Embodiment
Keywords
Sex work, Migration, Neoliberalism, Chad, Cameroon, Oil wealth
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-61722 (URN)10.1057/978-1-137-56036-0 (DOI)978-1-137-56035-3 (ISBN)978-1-137-56036-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-03-26 Created: 2017-03-26 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4505-1683

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