lnu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Brunow, Dagmar, Dr. phil.ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0068-8063
Publications (10 of 112) Show all publications
Brunow, D. (2019). Archival narratives: Curating history and memory in digitized collections. In: Structures and Voices: Storytelling in Post-Digital Times: The NECS 2019 Conference, Gdańsk 13-15. 06. 2019. Paper presented at Structures and Voices: Storytelling in Post-Digital Times. The NECS 2019 Conference, Gdańsk 13-15. 06. 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Archival narratives: Curating history and memory in digitized collections
2019 (English)In: Structures and Voices: Storytelling in Post-Digital Times: The NECS 2019 Conference, Gdańsk 13-15. 06. 2019, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

How do archives employ narratives and storytelling to curate access to their digitized collections? Drawing on the results of my research project “The Cultural Heritage of the Moving Image” (2016-2018), this paper examines how film archives recontextualise and contemporize historical content online, how they reflect upon it and how they cope with legal constraints and ethical considerations. It presents findings from studying the processes of regulation according to which some stories become ‘acknowledgeable’ while others are not recognized. This paper discusses how archives can foreground archival social inequalities as a result of collection policies, colonial representations or metadata management. It will look at ways of reflecting on hegemonic power structures in the curation of online content. The cases, looking especially at issues of race, class and sexuality, stem from both national film archives and ‘minor archives’, such as grass-root or community archives. Among these are ‘The BFI Player’, the online portal of the British Film Institute, and the Swedish website ‘Filmarkivet.se’, which has created access to some of the digitized collections from the Swedish National Film Archives, administered by the Swedish Film Institute (SFI) and the Royal Library (KB), as well as the Lesbian Home Movie Project (Maine) and bildwechsel, based in Hamburg.

Keywords
archives, digitization, film archives, heritage, recognition
National Category
Studies on Film
Research subject
Humanities, Film Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-86062 (URN)
Conference
Structures and Voices: Storytelling in Post-Digital Times. The NECS 2019 Conference, Gdańsk 13-15. 06. 2019
Projects
Den rörliga bildens kulturarv (VR)
Available from: 2019-06-29 Created: 2019-06-29 Last updated: 2019-08-08Bibliographically approved
Brunow, D. (2019). Archival power and audiovisual memory: recognizing social inequality in film archives. In: Power & the media. XXVII IAMHIST Conference: 16-18 July 2019, Northumbria University, UK. Paper presented at Power & the media. XXVII IAMHIST Conference. 16-18 July 2019, Northumbria University, UK (pp. 23-23). Newcastle: Northumbria University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Archival power and audiovisual memory: recognizing social inequality in film archives
2019 (English)In: Power & the media. XXVII IAMHIST Conference: 16-18 July 2019, Northumbria University, UK, Newcastle: Northumbria University , 2019, p. 23-23Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

How can heritage institutions deal with the challenges of diversity policies and possibly work as an intervention into hegemonic memory? This paper looks at the dynamics of recognition and visibility in national film archives. Setting out to examine on what terms marginalised lives of social and ethnic minorities are made visible, it analyses the work of national film archives in Sweden and the UK. This approach positions the archive into an object of analysis, shifting the focus on the archive as a site of knowledge retrieval to a site of knowledge production (Foucault 1972, Stoler 2002). Instead of looking at ways of including minorities as a priori identities, I suggest studying the processes of regulation according to which different lifestyles and experiences become ‘acknowledgeable’ (Schaffer 2008, Thomas et al 2017). The paper discusses how archives can foreground archival social inequalities as a result of collection policies, colonial representations or metadata management.  It will look at ways of reflecting on hegemonic power structures in the curation of online content. The case studies will be ‘The BFI Player’, the online portal of the British Film Institute, and the Swedish website ‘Filmarkivet.se’, which has created access to some of the digitized collections from the Swedish National Film Archives, administered by the Swedish Film Institute (SFI) and the Royal Library (KB).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Newcastle: Northumbria University, 2019
Keywords
archives, digitization, film archives, heritage, recognition
National Category
Studies on Film
Research subject
Humanities, Film Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-86973 (URN)
Conference
Power & the media. XXVII IAMHIST Conference. 16-18 July 2019, Northumbria University, UK
Projects
Den rörliga bildens kulturarv (VR)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-07-24 Created: 2019-07-24 Last updated: 2019-08-08Bibliographically approved
Brunow, D. (2019). From the safe space into cyberspace?: The ambivalence of lesbian visibility in film archives. In: The Lesbian Lives Conference 2019: The Politics of (In)Visibility. Centre for Transforming Sexuality and Gender & The School of Media, University of Brighton, 15th - 16th March 2019. Paper presented at The Lesbian Lives Conference 2019 : The Politics of (In)Visibility. Centre for Transforming Sexuality and Gender & The School of Media, University of Brighton, 15th - 16th March 2019. 6-6. (pp. 6-6). Brighton: University of Brighton
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From the safe space into cyberspace?: The ambivalence of lesbian visibility in film archives
2019 (English)In: The Lesbian Lives Conference 2019: The Politics of (In)Visibility. Centre for Transforming Sexuality and Gender & The School of Media, University of Brighton, 15th - 16th March 2019, Brighton: University of Brighton , 2019, p. 6-6Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Visibility has long been an important goal in European lesbian activism and an important means of political empowerment. Yet, visibility can also bring about an increased vulnerability for marginalized groups, especially in times of hate speech and an increasing political backlash. Moreover, we need to ask: whose visibility is recognized by whom, and on what grounds? In my paper I look at the ways both national and grassroot film archives recognize lesbian lives through collection and selection policies, through the use of metadata and via the curation of online access. Presenting case studies from the Swedish and British Film Institutes, from the Hamburg-based archive bildwechsel as well as the Lesbian Home Movie Project in Maine, this paper discusses the ambivalence of lesbian visibility after (amateur) film footage has left the safe space of the archive to be widely circulated online. The paper looks at legal and ethical challenges archivists are facing when dealing with nudity, lesbian affection and other representations which challenge hegemonic heteronormative scopic regimes. How can an ethically conducted archival practice be guaranteed? How can archives avoid making lesbian lives invisible again? This paper presents some of the results of my research project “The Cultural Heritage of the Moving Image” (Swedish Research Council 2016-2018).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Brighton: University of Brighton, 2019
National Category
Studies on Film
Research subject
Humanities, Film Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81829 (URN)
Conference
The Lesbian Lives Conference 2019 : The Politics of (In)Visibility. Centre for Transforming Sexuality and Gender & The School of Media, University of Brighton, 15th - 16th March 2019. 6-6.
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-04-11 Created: 2019-04-11 Last updated: 2019-04-15Bibliographically approved
Brunow, D. (2019). LGBT+ heritage, digital memories and film archives. In: Presented at OUTing the Past 2019 Festival Conference. LGBT+ Solidarity: Past and Present: 29 – 31 March 2019 at Ulster University, Belfast. Paper presented at Presented at OUTing the Past 2019 Festival Conference. LGBT+ Solidarity: Past and Present. 29 – 31 March 2019 at Ulster University, Belfast. Belfast: Ulster University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>LGBT+ heritage, digital memories and film archives
2019 (English)In: Presented at OUTing the Past 2019 Festival Conference. LGBT+ Solidarity: Past and Present: 29 – 31 March 2019 at Ulster University, Belfast, Belfast: Ulster University , 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Belfast: Ulster University, 2019
Keywords
archives, digitization, film archives, LGBT, heritage, recognition
National Category
Studies on Film
Research subject
Humanities, Film Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81831 (URN)
Conference
Presented at OUTing the Past 2019 Festival Conference. LGBT+ Solidarity: Past and Present. 29 – 31 March 2019 at Ulster University, Belfast
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-04-11 Created: 2019-04-11 Last updated: 2019-04-30Bibliographically approved
Brunow, D. (2019). Manchester’s post-punk heritage: mobilising and contesting transcultural memory in the context of urban regeneration. Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, 11(1), 9-29
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Manchester’s post-punk heritage: mobilising and contesting transcultural memory in the context of urban regeneration
2019 (English)In: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 9-29Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Urban memories are remediated and mobilised by different - and often conflicting - stakeholders, representing the heritage industry, municipal city branding campaigns or anti-gentrification struggles. Post-punk ‘retromania’ (Reynolds 2011) coincided with the culture-led regeneration of former industrial cities in the Northwest of England, relaunching the cities as creative clusters (Cohen 2007, Bottà 2009, Roberts & Cohen 2014, Roberts 2014). Drawing on my case study of the memory cultures evolving around Manchester‘s post-punk era (Brunow 2015), this article shows how narratives and images travel through urban space. Looking at contemporary politics of city branding, it examines the power relations involved in adapting (white homosocial) post-punk memories into the self-fashioning of Manchester as a creative city. Situated at the interface of memory studies and film studies, this article offers an anti-essentialist approach to the notion of ‘transcultural memory’. Examining the power relations involved in the construction of audiovisual memories, this article argues that subcultural or popular memories are not emancipatory per se, but can easily tie into neoliberal politics. Moreover, there has been a tendency to sideline or overlook feminist and queer as well as Black and Asian British contributions to post-punk culture. Only partially have such marginalised narratives been observed so far, for instance in Carol Morley’s documentary The Alcohol Years (2000) or by the Manchester Digital Music Archive. The article illustrates how different stakeholders invest in subcultural histories, sustaining or contesting hegemonic power relations within memory culture. While being remediated within various transmedia contexts, Manchester’s postpunk memories have been sanitised, fabricating consensus instead of celebrating difference.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping University Electronic Press, 2019
Keywords
Manchester, urban reconstruction, cultural memory, transcultural memory, post-punk, Carol Morley
National Category
Studies on Film
Research subject
Humanities, Film Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81920 (URN)2-s2.0-85065525858 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-13 Created: 2019-04-13 Last updated: 2019-06-26Bibliographically approved
Brunow, D. (2019). Queer Cinema. Kinofenster.de
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Queer Cinema
2019 (German)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, pages
Kinofenster.de, 2019
Keywords
queer cinema, film studies, LGBT*, representation
National Category
Studies on Film
Research subject
Humanities, Film Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-80207 (URN)
Available from: 2019-02-04 Created: 2019-02-04 Last updated: 2019-02-05Bibliographically approved
Brunow, D. & Gustafsson, T. (2019). The Face of AIDS Film Archive and cultural memories of the future: an interview with Staffan Hildebrand. Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, 9(1), 131-135
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Face of AIDS Film Archive and cultural memories of the future: an interview with Staffan Hildebrand
2019 (English)In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 131-135Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bristol: Intellect Ltd., 2019
Keywords
AIDS, Archive, Film, Face of AIDS Film Archive, Staffan Hildebrand
National Category
Studies on Film
Research subject
Humanities, Film Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-80902 (URN)10.1386/jsca.9.1.131_7 (DOI)000459829800012 ()
Available from: 2019-03-02 Created: 2019-03-02 Last updated: 2019-06-26Bibliographically approved
Brunow, D. (2019). Unqueering lesbian heritage?: Curating digital content in audiovisual archives. In: ALMS Conference Berlin 2019: Queering memory. Archive – Arts – Audiences. 27 – 29 June 2019, Haus der Kulturen der Welt. Paper presented at ALMS Conference Berlin 2019. Queering memory. Archive – Arts – Audiences. 27 – 29 June 2019, Haus der Kulturen der Welt (pp. 37-37). Magnus-Hirschfeld-Gesellschaft
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unqueering lesbian heritage?: Curating digital content in audiovisual archives
2019 (English)In: ALMS Conference Berlin 2019: Queering memory. Archive – Arts – Audiences. 27 – 29 June 2019, Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Magnus-Hirschfeld-Gesellschaft , 2019, p. 37-37Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Visibility has long been an important goal in European lesbian activism and an important means of political empowerment. Yet, visibility can also bring about an increased vulnerability for marginalized groups, especially in times of hate speech and an increasing political backlash. Moreover, we need to ask: whose visibility is recognized by whom, and on what grounds? In my paper I look at the ways both national and grassroot film archives recognize lesbian lives through collection and selection policies, through the use of metadata and via the curation of online access. Presenting case studies from the Swedish and British Film Institutes, from the Hamburg-based archive bildwechsel as well as the Lesbian Home Movie Project in Maine, this paper discusses the ambivalence of lesbian visibility after (amateur) film footage has left the safe space of the archive to be widely circulated online. The paper looks at legal and ethical challenges archivists are facing when dealing with nudity, lesbian affection and other representations which challenge hegemonic heteronormative scopic regimes. How can an ethically conducted archival practice be guaranteed? How can archives avoid making lesbian lives invisible again? This paper presents some of the results of my research project “The Cultural Heritage of the Moving Image” (Swedish Research Council 2016-2018).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Magnus-Hirschfeld-Gesellschaft, 2019
Keywords
archives, digitization, film archives, LGBT, heritage, recognition
National Category
Studies on Film History
Research subject
Humanities, Film Studies; Humanities, History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-86059 (URN)
Conference
ALMS Conference Berlin 2019. Queering memory. Archive – Arts – Audiences. 27 – 29 June 2019, Haus der Kulturen der Welt
Projects
Den rörliga bildens kulturarv (VR)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-06-29 Created: 2019-06-29 Last updated: 2019-08-08Bibliographically approved
Brunow, D. (2018). Archival tactics and queer vulnerability: Curating access to audiovisual heritage in Europe. In: media tactics and engagement, The NECS 2018 Conference: Amsterdam, Netherlands. June 27-29, 2018. Paper presented at media tactics and engagement, The NECS 2018 Conference : Amsterdam, Netherlands. June 27-29, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Archival tactics and queer vulnerability: Curating access to audiovisual heritage in Europe
2018 (English)In: media tactics and engagement, The NECS 2018 Conference: Amsterdam, Netherlands. June 27-29, 2018, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

How can heritage institutions deal with the challenges of diversity policies and possibly work as an intervention into hegemonic memory? This paper looks at the dynamics of recognition and queer visibility in audiovisual heritage. Setting out to examine on what terms queer lives are made visible, it analyses how national film archives in Sweden and the UK acknowledge queer vulnerability when following their diversity policies. This approach positions the archive into an object of analysis, shifting the focus on the archive as a site of knowledge retrieval to a site of knowledge production (Foucault 1972, Stoler 2002). Instead of looking at ways of including minorities as a priori identities, I suggest studying the processes of regulation according to which different lifestyles and experiences become ‘acknowledgeable’ (Schaffer 2008, Thomas et al 2017). These archival practices include the choice of metadata, the modes of selection for public screenings and online exhibition as well as the curation and contextualisation of online content. The case studies will be ‘The BFI Player’, the online portal of the British Film Institute, and the Swedish website ‘Filmarkivet.se’, which has created access to some of the digitised collections from the Swedish National Film Archives, administered by the Swedish Film Institute (SFI) and the Royal Library (KB).

National Category
Studies on Film
Research subject
Humanities, Film Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-76705 (URN)
Conference
media tactics and engagement, The NECS 2018 Conference : Amsterdam, Netherlands. June 27-29, 2018
Projects
Den rörliga bildens kulturarv
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-07-07 Created: 2018-07-07 Last updated: 2018-08-08Bibliographically approved
Brunow, D. (2018). Archiving AIDS activist video: A conversation with Jim Hubbard. In: Elisabet Björklund, Mariah Larsson (Ed.), A Visual History of AIDS: Exploring the Face of AIDS film archive (pp. 183-190). London & New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Archiving AIDS activist video: A conversation with Jim Hubbard
2018 (English)In: A Visual History of AIDS: Exploring the Face of AIDS film archive / [ed] Elisabet Björklund, Mariah Larsson, London & New York: Routledge, 2018, p. 183-190Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London & New York: Routledge, 2018
Series
Routledge Advances in the Medical Humanities
Keywords
AIDS, HIV, archive, film, Face of Aids, documentary filmmaking, Staffan Hildebrand
National Category
Studies on Film
Research subject
Humanities, Film Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77036 (URN)
Available from: 2018-08-01 Created: 2018-08-01 Last updated: 2018-09-20Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0068-8063

Search in DiVA

Show all publications