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Gerdin, G., Pringle, R. & Crocket, H. (2019). Coaching and ethical self-creation: problematizing the “efficient tennis machine”. Sport Coaching Review, 8(1), 25-42
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coaching and ethical self-creation: problematizing the “efficient tennis machine”
2019 (English)In: Sport Coaching Review, ISSN 2164-0629, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 25-42Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper we draw from Foucault, particularly his writings on the technologies of self, to problematize and reimagine understandings of what it means to coach effectively andethically. In recognising the difficulty of operationalising Foucauldian ideas, we provide a narrative-of-self to reveal how an elite tennis coach, Göran Gerdin, adopted Foucauldian ideas in a process of ethical self-creation. The narrative reveals how Göran experienced the tragedy of youth player suicide and how he critically reflected on his coaching role in relation to this tragedy. Through specifically problematizing the insidious influence of technologies of dominance on athletic subjectivity, Göran reveals how he drew from Foucault to develop alternative coach practices and a related telos. We conclude by reflecting on pragmatic issues associated with coaching with Foucault.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Foucault; ethics; coaching; technologies of self; problematization; telos
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-70650 (URN)10.1080/21640629.2018.1429114 (DOI)000461231600004 ()
Available from: 2018-02-09 Created: 2018-02-09 Last updated: 2019-03-29Bibliographically approved
Gerdin, G., Philpot, R. A., Larsson, L., Schenker, K., Linnér, S., Mordal Moen, K., . . . Legge, M. (2019). Researching social justice and health (in)equality across different school health and physical education contexts in Sweden, Norway and New Zealand. European Physical Education Review, 25(1), 273-290
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Researching social justice and health (in)equality across different school health and physical education contexts in Sweden, Norway and New Zealand
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2019 (English)In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 273-290Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The way school Health and Physical Education (HPE) is conceptualized and taught will impact on its ability to provide equitable outcomes across gender, sexuality, ethnicity, religion and social class. A focus on social justice in HPE is pertinent in times when these ideals are currently under threat from neoliberal globalization. This paper draws on data from the initial year of an international collaboration project called ‘Education for Equitable Health Outcomes – The Promise of School Health and Physical Education’ involving HPE and Physical Education Teacher Education researchers from Sweden, Norway and New Zealand. The data in this paper record the researchers’ presentations and discussions about issues of social justice and health as informed by school visits and interviews with HPE teachers in the three different countries. The analysis of the data is focused on what is addressed in the name of social justice in each of the three countries and how cross-cultural researchers of social justice in HPE interpret different contexts. In order to analyse the data, we draw on Michael Uljens’s concepts of non-affirmative and non-hierarchical education. The findings suggest that researching social justice and health (in)equality across different countries offers both opportunities and challenges when it comes to understanding the enactment of social justice in school and HPE practices. We conclude by drawing on Uljens to assert that the quest for social justice in HPE should focus on further problematizing affirmative and hierarchical educational practices since social justice teaching strategies are enabled and constrained by the contexts in which they are practised.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Health, equality, social justice, physical education, socially-critical perspective
National Category
Educational Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences; Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77144 (URN)10.1177/1356336X18783916 (DOI)000454077600018 ()
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 734928
Available from: 2018-08-16 Created: 2018-08-16 Last updated: 2019-01-23
Mooney, A. & Gerdin, G. (2018). Challenging gendered inequalities in boys’ physical education through video-stimulated reflections. Sport, Education and Society, 23(8), 761-772
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenging gendered inequalities in boys’ physical education through video-stimulated reflections
2018 (English)In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 23, no 8, p. 761-772Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite research over the past three decades that has examined links between masculinity, sport and Physical Education (PE), exclusionary practices and cultures that privilege some boys and masculinities at the expense of marginalised others are still commonly reported. With an historical legacy as a masculinity-making device, attempts to disrupt hegemonic and heteronormative cultures and pedagogies in PE that perpetuate gendered inequalities have had a modest influence, at best. This paper examines the use of visual methodologies to better understand the role of boys’ PE and sport in the construction of gender and sexuality. We argue that visual methodologies can capture social practices and spaces in ways that words alone cannot, hence enabling more nuanced interrogations and insights into gendered experiences in PE to be made. Data draws from video-stimulated reflections (VSR) of PE classes in two all-boys’ secondary schools in Australia and New Zealand. The Australian data examines VSR interviews with a female teacher involved in a Year 8 (aged 13-14 years) PE class. The New Zealand data is drawn from VSR interviews conducted during a year-long (visual) ethnography of two Year 10 (aged 14-15 years) PE classes with a male teacher. Drawing on Foucault (1980, Power/knowledge: Selected interviews and other writings 1972-1977 (C. Gordon, L. Marshall, J. Mepham & K. Soper, Trans.) New York, NY: Pantheon Books, 1988, Power/knowledge: Selected interviews and other writings 1972-1977 (C. Gordon, L. Marshall, J. Mepham & K. Soper, Trans.) New York, NY: Pantheon Books), we consider how these methodologies work to expose and obscure practices and pedagogies that contribute to gendered experiences for students and teachers that both privilege and marginalise. Using the tools of discourse, power and technologies of the self, our findings illustrate how VSR can serve as a collaborative (re)production of the visual material through moments of embodied dissonance. We argue that this ‘uncomfortableness’ can facilitate productive learnings about gendered/sexualised bodies and power in PE through critical reflection and ethical self-work. This knowledge, we believe, is key in disrupting and transforming taken-for-granted practices that continue to perpetuate inequitable gendered experiences in PE.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
National Category
Educational Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences Gender Studies
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-75955 (URN)10.1080/13573322.2018.1488682 (DOI)000442652000003 ()
Available from: 2018-06-15 Created: 2018-06-15 Last updated: 2018-09-13Bibliographically approved
Pringle, R., Larsson, H. & Gerdin, G. (Eds.). (2018). Critical Research in Sport, Health and Physical Education: How to make a difference. New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Critical Research in Sport, Health and Physical Education: How to make a difference
2018 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Within the overlapping fields of the sociology of sport, physical education and health education, the use of critical theories and the critical research paradigm has grown in scope. Yet what social impact has this research had?

This book considers the capacity of critical research and associated social theory to play an active role in challenging social injustices or at least in ‘making a difference’ within health and physical education (HPE) and sporting contexts. It also examines how the use of different social theories impacts sport policies, national curricula and health promotion activities, as well as the practices of HPE teaching and sport training and competition.

Critical Research in Sport, Health and Physical Education is a valuable resource for academics and students working in the fields of research methods, sociology of sport, physical education and health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Routledge, 2018. p. 260
Series
Routledge Research in Sport, Culture and Society
National Category
Educational Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science; Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81681 (URN)9781138571679 (ISBN)9780203702598 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-04-04 Created: 2019-04-04 Last updated: 2019-04-12Bibliographically approved
Pringle, R., Larsson, H. & Gerdin, G. (2018). Introduction: Are We Making a Difference?. In: Richard Pringle, Håkan Larsson & Göran Gerdin (Ed.), Critical Research in Sport, Health and Physical Education: How to make a difference (pp. 1-24). New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction: Are We Making a Difference?
2018 (English)In: Critical Research in Sport, Health and Physical Education: How to make a difference / [ed] Richard Pringle, Håkan Larsson & Göran Gerdin, New York: Routledge, 2018, p. 1-24Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Routledge, 2018
Series
Routledge Research in Sport, Culture and Society
National Category
Educational Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science; Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81682 (URN)9781138571679 (ISBN)9780203702598 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-04-04 Created: 2019-04-04 Last updated: 2019-04-12Bibliographically approved
Gerdin, G., Philpot, R. & Smith, W. (2018). It is only an intervention, but it can sow very fertile seeds: graduate physical education teachers' interpretations of critical pedagogy. Sport, Education and Society (3), 203-215
Open this publication in new window or tab >>It is only an intervention, but it can sow very fertile seeds: graduate physical education teachers' interpretations of critical pedagogy
2018 (English)In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, no 3, p. 203-215Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The role that school health and physical education (HPE) plays in the making of physically active and healthy citizens continues to be rearticulated within the field of HPE practice. In Australasia, for example, this is evident in HPE curricula changes that now span almost two decades with ongoing advocacy for greater recognition of socially-critical perspectives of physical activity and health. This paper reports on one part of a larger collaborative project that focussed on how HPE teachers understand and enact socially-critical perspectives in their practice. The paper draws on interview data obtained from 20 secondary school HPE teachers, all of whom graduated from the same physical education teacher education (PETE) programme in New Zealand, a programme that espouses a socially-critical orientation. The teaching experience of the study participants ranged from 1 to 22 years of service. The preliminary analysis involved deduction of common themes in relation to the research questions and then, drawing on the theoretical framework of Bourdieu (1990), these themes were analysed in more detail to gain insight into how and why the graduate teachers’ expressed their particular understanding of HPE and critical pedagogy. The findings suggested that this PETE programme did have some impact on the participant teachers’ perceptions of physical activity and health, and the role of socially-critical thinking. However, there was also evidence to suggest that many of them did not have a clear understanding of the transformative agenda of critical pedagogy. We conclude by suggesting that although this PETE programme did plant ‘seeds’ that had an impact on the graduate teachers’ awareness and thinking about socially-critical issues in relation to physical activity and health, it did not necessarily turn them into critical pedagogues.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
Health, Physical Education, PETE, Critical Pedagogy, Social Justice
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Sociology, Sociology Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-51484 (URN)10.1080/13573322.2016.1174846 (DOI)000423777800001 ()
Available from: 2016-03-29 Created: 2016-03-29 Last updated: 2018-02-15Bibliographically approved
Gerdin, G., Hedberg, M. & Hageskog, C.-A. (2018). Relative Age Effect in Swedish Male and Female Tennis Players Born in 1998–2001. Sports, 6(2), 1-12, Article ID 38.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relative Age Effect in Swedish Male and Female Tennis Players Born in 1998–2001
2018 (English)In: Sports, E-ISSN 2075-4663, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 1-12, article id 38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The relative age effect (RAE) has been extensively debated and researched in both popularmedia and academic discourse. This study examined RAE in Swedish tennis players born in1998–2001. The study was conducted in 2015–2016 and includes all ranked Swedish tennis players(n = 1835) registered in the Swedish Tennis Association database from the year 2014. The resultsshow that when the birth dates of the corresponding Swedish population and all the ranked playersare compared, they show a moderate RAE; however, the higher up they are in the ranking system,the greater the RAE becomes. Top 10 players display an average of 64.1% being born in the firsthalf of the year. Some gender differences were also found, with a greater proportion of bothhigher and lower ranked females being born in the first half of the year. In our discussion ofthe findings we raise several issues that need to be addressed to provide more equal opportunitiesfor all junior players regardless of birth date. Resolving ongoing problems associated with RAEin competitive sports such as tennis is important both in term of prolonged participation in thesport and increased performance. Suggestions made in this article include recognising RAE whendesigning the format of competitions/tournaments, not using official rankings until the juniorsget older, addressing RAE in a “gender sensitive” way, and conducting further in-depth studiesin which RAE is understood/examined as being associated with environmental factors. Althoughthese findings show the RAE effect in Swedish tennis players, thus pointing at the need for furtherconsideration in terms of ranking and selection procedures to ensure equal opportunities for playerdevelopment, the study also concludes by reasserting an emphasis on a holistic approach to playerdevelopment in which coaches focus on the developmentally appropriate needs and potential of eachindividual player regardless of their biological age.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel: MDPI, 2018
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-73585 (URN)10.3390/sports6020038 (DOI)000436282300014 ()29910342 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-24 Created: 2018-04-24 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Gerdin, G., Smith, W., Mordal Moen, K., Westlie, K., Larsson, L., Schenker, K., . . . Linnér, S. (2018). Researching social justice and health (in)equality across different school health and physical education contexts. In: : . Paper presented at European Conference on Educational Research, ECER 2018, Bolzano, 3-7 Sept, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Researching social justice and health (in)equality across different school health and physical education contexts
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2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Although school Health and Physical Education (HPE) has the potential to contribute to lifelong health and well-being, the way HPE isconceptualized and taught will impact on its ability to provide equitable outcomes across gender, sexuality, ethnicity, religion and socialclass. The genesis of this symposium comes from the ongoing international collaboration project - Education for Equitable HealthOutcomes - The Promise of School Health and Physical Education (EDUHEALTH) consisting of Physical Education Teacher Education(PETE) teachers and researchers from Sweden, Norway and New Zealand. The aim of the EDUHEALTH project is to contribute to theunderstanding of how teachers of HPE teach for social justice by examining the teaching practices of teachers. A focus on equity,democracy and social justice in HPE can be seen as particularly pertinent in times when these ideals are currently under threat fromneoliberal globalisation (Azzarito, Macdonald, Dagkas & Fisette, 2017). The research question guiding this project are: (i) How do HPE teachers’ practices address democracy and social justice? (ii) How may HPE practice contribute to greater inclusion and equitable health outcomes for all students? The session will begin with an introduction to the symposium followed by the first part of paper one which will provide a brief overview ofthe background and implementation of the EDUHEALTH project to date.The second paper will then explicate our conceptualisation of the term social justice as concerned with equity, taking account of many variables including gender, sexuality, socioeconomic, and ethnicity, and within the context of HPE, physicality. The discussion on this paper will draw on Bell’s (1997) concept of social justice as both a process and a goal along with Wright’s (2004) claim that a pedagogy focused on social justice embraces emancipatory practices or processes that have the goal of helping students identify, challenge and transform existing unequal power relations relating to physical activity and health. In this paper we will also discuss the different theoretical perspectives that we are considering in relation to understanding and subsequently analysing social justice in HPE as informed by the works of, for instance, Habermas, Bourdieu, Foucault and Uljens. The third paper will then discuss our methodology and methods for generating data involving HPE class observations and teacher interview in the three different countries and employing a critical incident technique (Tripp, 2012) along with stimulated-recall interviews toexplore HPE teaching practices that enact socially-critical perspective of physical activity and health. At the conclusion of the third paper we will return to the first paper and draw on some initial findings of this project to date in terms of the potential, and difficulties, of researching social justice and health (in)equality across different school health and physical education contexts. The potential comes from having outsiders critically examining the societal, educational, and HPE context and offering new insights. The difficulties are in reaching a shared understanding of what it means to be socially critical and applying this understanding in each of the three different contexts. At the end we tentatively suggest that in our ongoing work with this project and by drawing on Freire (2000) and Tinning (2010) that there is no ‘holy grail’ in terms of a social justice teaching method for HPE practice since teaching strategies are enabled and constrained by the contexts in which they are practiced. Finally, a discussant will reflect on the work presented and the nature of the project before opening the floor to the audience for the final 20 minutes of the symposium.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81685 (URN)
Conference
European Conference on Educational Research, ECER 2018, Bolzano, 3-7 Sept, 2018
Projects
EDUHEALTH
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 734928
Available from: 2019-04-04 Created: 2019-04-04 Last updated: 2019-04-12Bibliographically approved
Philpot, R., Gerdin, G. & Smith, W. (2018). Socially-critical PE: The influence of critical research on the social justice agenda in PETE and PE practice. In: Richard Pringle, Håkan Larsson & Göran Gerdin (Ed.), Critical Research in Sport, Health and Physical Education: How to make a difference (pp. 134-146). New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Socially-critical PE: The influence of critical research on the social justice agenda in PETE and PE practice
2018 (English)In: Critical Research in Sport, Health and Physical Education: How to make a difference / [ed] Richard Pringle, Håkan Larsson & Göran Gerdin, New York: Routledge, 2018, p. 134-146Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Routledge, 2018
Series
Routledge Research in Sport, Culture and Society
National Category
Educational Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science; Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81683 (URN)9781138571679 (ISBN)9780203702598 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-04-04 Created: 2019-04-04 Last updated: 2019-04-12Bibliographically approved
Gerdin, G. & Larsson, H. (2018). The productive effect of power: (dis)pleasurable bodies materialising in and through the discursive practices of boys’ physical education. Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, 23(1), 66-83
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The productive effect of power: (dis)pleasurable bodies materialising in and through the discursive practices of boys’ physical education
2018 (English)In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 66-83Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Pleasure is often a key feature of school physical education (PE) and, indeed, a lot of students find pleasure in and through PE while others do not. However, pleasure is rarely considered to be of educational value in the subject (Pringle, 2010). Further, since pleasure is linked to power (Foucault, 1980; Gerdin & Pringle, 2015) it is in fact not entirely straightforward to legitimise the educational value of PE in relation to pleasure.

Purpose: In this paper, we explore how a group of boys derive pleasures from their involvement in PE, but also how these power-induced pleasures are integral to gender normalisation processes. The findings presented are particularly discussed in terms of inclusive/exclusive pedagogical practices related to gender, bodies and pleasures.

Research setting and participants: The research setting was a single-sex, boys’ secondary school in Auckland, New Zealand. Participants in this study were 60 Year 10 (age 14-15) students from two PE classes.

Data collection and analysis: Using a visual ethnographic approach (Pink, 2007) involving observations and video recordings of boys participating in PE, the boys’ representations and interpretations of the visual data were explored during both focus groups and individual interviews. The data was analysed using (a visually oriented) discourse analysis (Foucault, 1998; Rose, 2007).

Findings: By elucidating the discursive practices of PE in this setting and employing Butler’s (1993) concept of ‘materialisation’, we suggest that boy’s bodies materialise as productive and pleasurable or displeasurable bodies through submitting/subjecting to certain bodily regimes, developing embodied mastery when it comes to certain sports, and displaying bodies in particular ways. The analysis indicate that the discursive practices of PE contribute to boys’ bodies materialising as pleasurable or dis-pleasurable and the (re)production of gender in the subject as shaped by discourse and the productive effect of power.

Discussion and conclusions: In line with Gard (2008) we conclude that the focus on certain discursively constructed bodily practices at the same time continues to restrict the production of a diversity of bodily movement pleasures. Hence, traditional gender patterns are reproduced through a selection of particular sports/physical activities that all the students are expected to participate in. We propose that the ongoing constitution of privileged forms of masculinity, masculine bodies and masculine pleasures as related to fitness, health and sport and (certain) boys’ subsequent exercise of power in PE needs further critical examination.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
Pleasure, Bodies, Materialisation, Masculinity, Physical Education
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Gender Studies
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science; Social Sciences, Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-60882 (URN)10.1080/17408989.2017.1294669 (DOI)000417612800005 ()
Available from: 2017-02-22 Created: 2017-02-22 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2922-1993

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