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Publications (10 of 133) Show all publications
Hägerdal, H. (2019). Helen Creese, Bali in the early Nineteenth Century. The ethnographic Accounts of Pierre Dubois. Leiden: Brill, 2016, xx + 826 pp. [Verhandelingen van het Koninklijk Instituut voor Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde, 305]. ISBN 978904315822. Price: EUR 139.00 (hardback). [Review]. Bijdragen Tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde, 175(1), 98-100
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Helen Creese, Bali in the early Nineteenth Century. The ethnographic Accounts of Pierre Dubois. Leiden: Brill, 2016, xx + 826 pp. [Verhandelingen van het Koninklijk Instituut voor Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde, 305]. ISBN 978904315822. Price: EUR 139.00 (hardback).
2019 (English)In: Bijdragen Tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde, ISSN 0006-2294, E-ISSN 2213-4379, Vol. 175, no 1, p. 98-100Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
KITLV Press, 2019
National Category
History Cultural Studies
Research subject
Humanities, History; Humanities, Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-84529 (URN)10.1163/22134379-17501007 (DOI)000467991600010 ()
Available from: 2019-06-05 Created: 2019-06-05 Last updated: 2019-06-05Bibliographically approved
Billore, S. & Hägerdal, H. (2019). The Indian Patola: Import and consumerism in early modern Indonesia. Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, 11(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Indian Patola: Import and consumerism in early modern Indonesia
2019 (English)In: Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, ISSN 1755-750X, E-ISSN 1755-7518, Vol. 11, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

The paper will focus on the Indian influence in the transfer of, the business of, and consumer markets for Indian products, and more specifically textiles, from producers in the South Asian subcontinent to the lands to the east of Bali. This aspect of the influence of Indian products has received some attention in a general but not been sufficiently elucidated with regard to eastern Indonesia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bingley, UK: , 2019
Keywords
consumerism, cultural consumption, Patola, India, Indonesia
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Economy, Marketing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-82326 (URN)
Available from: 2019-04-28 Created: 2019-04-28 Last updated: 2019-05-08
Hägerdal, H. (2019). Wetar and Kisar in Indonesia, and East Timor: Colonial encroachment, migration, and strategies of survival in the 17th century. Indonesia and the Malay World, 47(138: Special Issue), 199-219
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wetar and Kisar in Indonesia, and East Timor: Colonial encroachment, migration, and strategies of survival in the 17th century
2019 (English)In: Indonesia and the Malay World, ISSN 1363-9811, E-ISSN 1469-8382, Vol. 47, no 138: Special Issue, p. 199-219Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The article studies a complex of little known historical processes in Southwestern Maluku and East Timor in the late 17th century. These occurred in the intersection between early colonial attempts at political and economic control, and local strategies to either accommodate or avoid such control. The article argues that the aspirations of European or Eurasian groups - the Dutch VOC and the ethnically mixed Portuguese Topasses - allowed certain local leaders to use early colonial rivalries to build up positions that transgressed their customary prerogatives. Moreover, the processes must be seen as an interplay between global, regional and local spatial levels. The article focuses in particular on two protagonists. Bakker, a chief in the island of Kisar, was briefly expelled through a Topass invasion in 1668 but reinstated by a Dutch expeditionary force, henceforth cooperating closely with the Dutch post in Banda. Sili Saba (Raja Salomon), was the ruler of Ade (Vemasse) in East Timor. An attempt to ally with the VOC in 1668 misfired as the Topasses invaded East Timor in the same year, and Sili Saba was installed as interlocutor for the VOC in Wetar. The article shows how the Wetar Straits, which had a binding function for culturally similar populations, was turned into a sea border which still persists. It also demonstrates how local groups obstructed the imposed order through resistance and migrations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Keywords
Colonialism, East Timor, Kisar, Portugal, VOC, Wetar
National Category
History
Research subject
Humanities, History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-84840 (URN)10.1080/13639811.2019.1582887 (DOI)000465891100001 ()
Available from: 2019-06-12 Created: 2019-06-12 Last updated: 2019-06-12Bibliographically approved
Hägerdal, H. (2018). Colonial impact at the margin: Contact zones in the Aru Islands. In: Symposium – European Colonialism in Southeast Asia: Charles Darwin University, 30 November 2017. Paper presented at Symposium – European Colonialism in Southeast Asia : Charles Darwin University, 30 November 2017. Australia: Charles Darwin University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Colonial impact at the margin: Contact zones in the Aru Islands
2018 (English)In: Symposium – European Colonialism in Southeast Asia: Charles Darwin University, 30 November 2017, Australia: Charles Darwin University , 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The Aru Islands are situated at the eastern end of the Indian Ocean world, in the southern Moluccas. It is also one of the easternmost places in the world where Islam and Christianity gained a (limited) foothold in the early-modern period, and housed the easternmost fortress of the Dutch East India Company (VOC). The present paper discusses Western-Arunese relations up to the early 19th century in terms of economic exchange and political networks. Aru society was stateless and relatively egalitarian but eluded strong colonial control up to c. 1900. Still the perceived marginality of the islands was paired with its status as a source of natural products destined for luxury consumption in Asia and Europe: pearls, tripang, birds-of-paradise, edible birds' nests. All this positioned Aru in a global economic network while leaving it largely ungoverned. The extant textual material consists of Dutch reports; however, critically read and compared with oral and archaeological data, these may yield important information about indigenous responses to European attempts to control the flow of goods. It is possible to develop the argument made by Roy Ellen about economic flows in eastern Indonesia beyond the VOC system, and also to draw parallels with James Scott's thesis about state-avoidance among ethnic minorities in mainland Southeast Asia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Australia: Charles Darwin University, 2018
Keywords
Aru Islands, Indonesia, colonialism, contact zones, trade
National Category
History
Research subject
Humanities, History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77427 (URN)
Conference
Symposium – European Colonialism in Southeast Asia : Charles Darwin University, 30 November 2017
Projects
Concurrences
Available from: 2018-08-28 Created: 2018-08-28 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Hägerdal, H. (2018). Expansion and internalization of modes of warfare in pre-colonial Bali. In: Michael W. Charney, Kathryn Wellen (Ed.), Warring Societies of Pre-colonial Southeast Asia: Local Cultures of Conflict Within a Regional Context (pp. 129-153). Copenhagen: NIAS Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expansion and internalization of modes of warfare in pre-colonial Bali
2018 (English)In: Warring Societies of Pre-colonial Southeast Asia: Local Cultures of Conflict Within a Regional Context / [ed] Michael W. Charney, Kathryn Wellen, Copenhagen: NIAS Press, 2018, p. 129-153Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Among the fifteen or so polities of some consequence in early-modern insular Southeast Asia, Bali was unique in being non-Muslim. While no full explanation for this fact has been offered so far, it is at a minimum clear that the Balinese developed military skills which made them well-known even outside their modest-sized island. Balinese modes of warfare over the centuries can be followed sketchily from archival materials, in the first hand Dutch sources. External views are also offered by Javanese, Sasak and Sumbawan sources. Balinese historical traditions are obsessed with warfare, although the relatively late and stereotypical portrayals of war offer problems in interpretation. What is clear from the extant records is that the period 1500-1800 included periods of strong military expansion which was able to temporarily hold back major central polities such as Mataram. This can be attributed to both internal dynamics, such as political and demographic conditions, and external factors such as the vacuum created by the defeat of several Muslim polities at the hands of the VOC. From the second half of the 18th century Balinese warfare tended to be internalized as the area of activity of the Balinese was confined to Bali itself (together with the previously subdued Lombok). Internal warfare tended to grow more intense towards the late 19th century, paving the way for the definite colonial subjugation in 1906-08. The essay traces the changes in the mode of warfare over a period of about 400 years, relating it to technological and political developments in the Southeast Asian neighbourhood region.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Copenhagen: NIAS Press, 2018
Series
NIAS - Nordic Institute of Asian Studies : NIAS Studies in Asian topics ; 62
Keywords
Bali, Indonesia, warfare
National Category
History
Research subject
Humanities, History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-69628 (URN)978-87-7694-228-1 (ISBN)978-87-7694-229-8 (ISBN)
Projects
Concurrences
Available from: 2018-01-08 Created: 2018-01-08 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Hägerdal, H. (2018). From Peace and Order to New Order: Colonial and postcolonial forced relocations in eastern Indonesia. In: Global Challenges: Borders, Populism and the Postcolonial Condition - An international conference on critical theory, postcoloniality, migration and populism: Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden, 14-16 June 2018. Paper presented at Global Challenges : Borders, Populism and the Postcolonial Condition - An international conference on critical theory, postcoloniality, migration and populism. Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden, 14-16 June 2018. Växjö: Linnaeus University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Peace and Order to New Order: Colonial and postcolonial forced relocations in eastern Indonesia
2018 (English)In: Global Challenges: Borders, Populism and the Postcolonial Condition - An international conference on critical theory, postcoloniality, migration and populism: Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden, 14-16 June 2018, Växjö: Linnaeus University , 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The present paper aims to trace a genealogy of colonialism, and to see how practices of restructuring local societies by the classical colonial state were reified by the post-colonial state, many decades after formal decolonization. The case that will be discussed is relocation of settlements in the eastern part of Indonesia. What motives drove the authorities of the Netherlands East Indies to resettle populations against  their will, and why did the authoritarian Indonesian regime in the late 20th century take over the practice?

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Växjö: Linnaeus University, 2018
Keywords
Indonesia, colonialism, postcolonial, violence, relocation
National Category
History
Research subject
Humanities, History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77423 (URN)
Conference
Global Challenges : Borders, Populism and the Postcolonial Condition - An international conference on critical theory, postcoloniality, migration and populism. Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden, 14-16 June 2018
Projects
Concurrences
Available from: 2018-08-28 Created: 2018-08-28 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Hägerdal, H., Ehriander, H. & Nilson, M. (Eds.). (2018). Humanetten 39/2017: Linnéuniversitetets sommarkurser 10 år : jubileumsnummer. Växjö: Linnaeus University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Humanetten 39/2017: Linnéuniversitetets sommarkurser 10 år : jubileumsnummer
2018 (Swedish)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [sv]

Antologi med åtta bidrag rörande barnlitteratur och fantasy, med anledning av tioårsjubiléet för sommarkurserna i litteraturvetenskap vid Växjö universitet och Linnéuniversitetet.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Växjö: Linnaeus University Press, 2018. p. 164
Series
Skrifter utgivna av Svenska barnboksinstitutet, ISSN 0347-5387 ; 145
Keywords
litteraturvetenskap, sommarkurs, barnlitteratur, fantasy
National Category
General Literature Studies
Research subject
Humanities, Comparative literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-71425 (URN)978-91-88761-23-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-03-07 Created: 2018-03-07 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Hägerdal, H. (2018). Lengser kaprabon: Auktoritet, makt och auktoritärism i det moderna Indonesien. In: Mats Trondman, Malin Lennartsson (Ed.), Auktoritet: (pp. 167-187). Göteborg: Daidalos
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lengser kaprabon: Auktoritet, makt och auktoritärism i det moderna Indonesien
2018 (Swedish)In: Auktoritet / [ed] Mats Trondman, Malin Lennartsson, Göteborg: Daidalos, 2018, p. 167-187Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [sv]

Kapitlet diskuterar politisk auktoritet i det moderna Indonesien (sedan 1949), i huvudsak under Sukarno- och Soehartoerorna fram till 1998. Traditionella föreställningars roll analyseras gentemot reella sociala och maktpolitiska förhållanden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: Daidalos, 2018
Keywords
Indonesien, auktoritet, Sukarno, Soeharto
National Category
History
Research subject
Humanities, History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-73990 (URN)978-91-7173-538-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-05-08 Created: 2018-05-08 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Duggan, G. & Hägerdal, H. (2018). Savu: History and Oral Tradition on an Island of Indonesia. Singapore: Singapore University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Savu: History and Oral Tradition on an Island of Indonesia
2018 (English)Book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The work combines anththropological fieldwork and archival research in order to study the historical trajectories of Savu, an island in the Indonesian province Nusa Tenggara Timur. Savunese society is marked by a tight genealogically defined social system which has been able to allocate scarce natural resources. The island, traditionally divided into five domains or princedoms, was included in the political network of the Dutch VOC in the 1640s. The Savunese had importance for the Dutch as providers of auxiliaries, and later as exporters of horses, textiles, etc. The book follows the vicissitudes of Savu over the colonial period, Japanese occupation, revolution, and the postcolonial era.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Singapore: Singapore University Press, 2018. p. 586
Keywords
Savu, Indonesia, oral tradition, colonialism, Nusa Tenggara Timur
National Category
History
Research subject
Humanities, History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78243 (URN)978-981-47-2275-9 (ISBN)
Projects
Concurrences
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-10-10 Created: 2018-10-10 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Hägerdal, H. (2018). Slavery through missionary lenses: Timor in the 19th century. In: 2nd Leiden Slavery Studies Association Biennial ‘Slaving Zones’ Conference: Slavery and Forced Labour in Asia, c. 1250-c. 1900 : Continuities and Transformations in Comparative Perspective : 1-3 June, 2017. Paper presented at 2nd Leiden Slavery Studies Association Biennial ‘Slaving Zones’ Conference : Slavery and Forced Labour in Asia, c. 1250-c. 1900 : Continuities and Transformations in Comparative Perspective : 1-3 June, 2017. Leiden: Leiden University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Slavery through missionary lenses: Timor in the 19th century
2018 (English)In: 2nd Leiden Slavery Studies Association Biennial ‘Slaving Zones’ Conference: Slavery and Forced Labour in Asia, c. 1250-c. 1900 : Continuities and Transformations in Comparative Perspective : 1-3 June, 2017, Leiden: Leiden University , 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The aim of the paper is to explore perceptions of slavery in zones of interaction between European and indigenous communities in the mid-colonial era, seen through the lens of missionary writings and focusing on the Timor Residency in the Dutch East Indies in the 19th century. While slave trade was formally abolished in the Dutch colonies shortly after the British interregnum, this largely became a dead letter as slaves were acquired and traded until at least the 1830s by Dutch interests, and until after 1900 by indigenous groups. This was in particular the case in the areas where colonial control was weak or non-existent. The colonial contact zones in eastern Indonesia, such as Kupang in Timor, housed considerable slave populations until the second half of the 19th century, and slave labour was an essential part of the household economy of the European or Eurasian burghers. The paper studies how the position and work of slaves were perceived by Reformed Christian missionaries of the Nederlandsch Zendelinggenootschap (NZG) who were active in the Timor area since 1819. A large body of letters and reports have been preserved at Utrecht and provide a comprehensive picture of how slaves interacted with their superiors in daily life. This material is written in a more independent and critical style than official colonial reports, and is often more initiated than travel accounts. The European missionaries, driven by ideals of personal piety, encountered the moral dilemma at their arrival, how to fit into a society where slavery was widely accepted as a fact of life. The paper shows how the views in the letters spans over a range of attitudes, from reluctant acceptance to utter disapproval, and discusses what this material may tell us about the actual conditions of unfree labourers in a hybrid milieu.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Leiden: Leiden University, 2018
Keywords
Indonesia, Timor, slavery, missionaries, colonialism
National Category
History
Research subject
Humanities, History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77426 (URN)
Conference
2nd Leiden Slavery Studies Association Biennial ‘Slaving Zones’ Conference : Slavery and Forced Labour in Asia, c. 1250-c. 1900 : Continuities and Transformations in Comparative Perspective : 1-3 June, 2017
Projects
Concurrences
Available from: 2018-08-28 Created: 2018-08-28 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4758-191X

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