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Witthöft, Cornelia M.ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0387-4312
Publications (10 of 51) Show all publications
Hefni, M. E., Schaller, F. & Witthöft, C. M. (2018). Betaine, choline and folate content in different cereal genotypes. Journal of Cereal Science, 80, 72-79
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Betaine, choline and folate content in different cereal genotypes
2018 (English)In: Journal of Cereal Science, ISSN 0733-5210, E-ISSN 1095-9963, Vol. 80, p. 72-79Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The importance of dietary methyl donors, e.g. betaine, choline and folate, is increasingly being recognised. This study examined variations in methyl donor concentrations in different cereals grown in Sweden. Fourteen cereal samples, representing different genera and cultivars, were analysed using HPLC- UV/FLD. The content of methyl donors in the cereals varied significantly due to cereal genotype. Betaine content varied most, with 28 mg/100 g DM in oats and 176 mg/100 g DM in rye. Total choline varied less, with 67 mg/100 g DM in rye and 149 mg/100 g DM in naked barley. In wheat, the lowest concentration of folate with 36 mg/100 g DM was found, and the highest of 91 mg/100 g DM in barley. Esterified choline was the major contributor to total choline content (80e95%) in the cereals. Free choline was less abundant, ranging from 3 to 27mg/100g DM. 5-CHO-H4folate was the dominant folate form in all cereals, amounting to approx. 35e50% of the sum of folates, as determined after pre-column conversion. Due to the limited number of available cultivars, no interpretation regarding effects from cultivar can be made. In conclusion, the studied cereal genotypes are good sources of methyl donors, but concentrations show considerable variation between different cereals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Food Science
Research subject
Natural Science, Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72660 (URN)10.1016/j.jcs.2018.01.013 (DOI)000430903300012 ()
Available from: 2018-04-12 Created: 2018-04-12 Last updated: 2018-07-11Bibliographically approved
Röös, E., Carlsson, G., Ferawati, F., Hefni, M. E., Stephan, A., Tidåker, P. & Witthöft, C. M. (2018). Less meat, more legumes: prospects and challenges in the transition toward sustainable diets in Sweden. Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems, 1-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Less meat, more legumes: prospects and challenges in the transition toward sustainable diets in Sweden
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2018 (English)In: Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems, ISSN 1742-1705, E-ISSN 1742-1713, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The Western diet is characterized by high meat consumption, which negatively affects the environment and human health. Transitioning toward eating more plant-based products in Western societies has been identified as a key instrument to tackle these problems. However, one potential concern is that radically reducing meat in the current diet might lead to deficiencies in nutritional intake. In this paper, we explore a scenario in which meat consumption in Sweden is reduced by 50% and replaced by domestically grown grain legumes. We quantify and discuss the implications for nutritional intake on population level, consequences for agricultural production systems and environmental performance. The reduction in meat consumption is assumed to come primarily from a decrease in imported meat. We use data representing current Swedish conditions including the Swedish dietary survey, the Swedish food composition database, Statistics Sweden and existing life cycle assessments for different food items. At population level, average daily intake of energy and most macro- and micro-nutrients would be maintained within the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations after the proposed transition (e.g., for protein, fat, zinc, vitamin B12 and total iron). The transition would also provide a considerable increase in dietary fiber and some increase in folate intake, which are currently below the recommended levels. The transition scenario would increase total area of grain legume cultivation from 2.2% (current level) to 3.2% of Swedish arable land and is considered technically feasible. The climate impact of the average Swedish diet would be reduced by 20% and the land use requirement by 23%. There would be a net surplus of approximately 21,500 ha that could be used for bioenergy production, crop production for export, nature conservation, etc. Implementation of this scenario faces challenges, such as lack of suitable varieties for varying conditions, lack of processing facilities to supply functional legume-based ingredients to food industries and low consumer awareness about the benefits of eating grain legumes. In sum, joint efforts from multiple actors are needed to stimulate a decrease in meat consumption and to increase cultivation and use of domestically grown grain legumes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2018
National Category
Food Science Agricultural Science
Research subject
Natural Science, Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-79177 (URN)10.1017/S1742170518000443 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2018-12-13 Created: 2018-12-13 Last updated: 2019-01-24
Hefni, M. E., Witthöft, C. M. & Moazzami, A. (2018). Plasma metabolite profiles in healthy women differ after intervention with supplemental folic acid v. folate-rich foods. Journal of Nutritional Science, 7, 1-9, Article ID e32.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Plasma metabolite profiles in healthy women differ after intervention with supplemental folic acid v. folate-rich foods
2018 (English)In: Journal of Nutritional Science, ISSN 2048-6790, E-ISSN 2048-6790, Vol. 7, p. 1-9, article id e32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Public health authorities recommend all fertile women to increase their folate intake to 400 μg/d by eating folate-rich foods or by taking a folic acid supplement to protect against neural tube defects. In a previous study it was shown that folate-rich foods improved folate blood status as effectively as folic acid supplementation. The aim of the present study was to investigate, using NMR metabolomics, the effects of an intervention with a synthetic folic acid supplement v. native food folate on the profile of plasma metabolites. Healthy women with normal folate status received, in parallel, 500 μg/d synthetic folic acid from a supplement (n 18), 250 μg/d folate from intervention foods (n 19), or no additional folate (0 μg/d) through a portion of apple juice (n 20). The metabolic profile of plasma was measured using 1H-NMR in fasted blood drawn at baseline and after 12 weeks of intervention. Metabolic differences between the groups at baseline and after intervention were assessed using a univariate statistical approach (P ≤ 0·001, Bonferroni-adjusted significance level). At baseline, the groups showed no significant differences in measured metabolite concentrations. After intervention, eight metabolites, of which six (glycine, choline, betaine, formate, histidine and threonine) are related to one-carbon metabolism, were identified as discriminative metabolites. The present study suggests that different folate forms (synthetic v. natural) may affect related one-carbon metabolites differently.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
UK: Cambridge University Press, 2018
Keywords
Folic acid, Folate, Dietary interventions, One-carbon metabolism, Metabolomics
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Natural Science, Food Science; Natural Science, Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-79169 (URN)10.1017/jns.2018.22 (DOI)000451125400001 ()30510697 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-12 Created: 2018-12-12 Last updated: 2019-01-24Bibliographically approved
Sonesson, U., Davis, J., Flysjo, A., Gustaysson, J. & Witthöft, C. M. (2017). Protein quality as functional unit: A methodological framework for inclusion in life cycle assessment of food. Journal of Cleaner Production, 140(Special Issue, Part 2), 470-478
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Protein quality as functional unit: A methodological framework for inclusion in life cycle assessment of food
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 140, no Special Issue, Part 2, p. 470-478Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In order to. develop more sustainable food systems, there is a need to find methods that simultaneously consider environmental impacts and nutritional benefits. The purpose of this, study was to develop a functional unit to be used in LCA of foods that builds on the nutritional value of food products. We used the content and quality of proteins as a basis, and included dietary context as part of our method, since the nutritional value of a nutrient depends on the total dietary intake. Our method uses the digestible intake of the nine essential amino acids in the product and relates these values to the equivalent total dietary intake of the same amino acids. We also employed simpler functional units such as "gram (g) protein" and "g digestible protein." We quantified the functional units for three dietary contexts and applied it on LCA results for bread, chicken fillet, minced pork, minced beef, milk and pea soup. The results showed that the relative differences between products changed when using a protein-based functional unit, with the largest change occurring when going from mass as the functional unit to g protein. By introducing protein digestibility, the systematic under-valuation of the animal products was partly avoided with little additional effort. The most advanced functional unit affected the results compared to the mass-based functional unit most, but required significantly more data. The impact of dietary context was smaller than expected; hence, it might be possible to simplify the inclusion of dietary context by using aggregated descriptions of diets. The method presented is valuable for adding an important aspect of nutrition (protein quality and content) to the LCA results of single products, but there is a large scope for development. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Functional unit, Nutrition, Protein, LCA, Food
National Category
Food Science
Research subject
Natural Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-59462 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2016.06.115 (DOI)000388775200008 ()
Available from: 2016-12-23 Created: 2016-12-23 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved
Nicolas, G., Witthöft, C. M., Vignat, J., Knaze, V., Huybrechts, I., Roe, M., . . . Slimani, N. (2016). Compilation of a standardised international folate database for EPIC.. Food Chemistry, 193, 134-140
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Compilation of a standardised international folate database for EPIC.
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2016 (English)In: Food Chemistry, ISSN 0308-8146, E-ISSN 1873-7072, Vol. 193, p. 134-140Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper describes the methodology applied for compiling an "international end-user" folate database. This work benefits from the unique dataset offered by the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) (N=520,000 subjects in 23 centres). Compilation was done in four steps: (1) identify folate-free foods then find folate values for (2) folate-rich foods common across EPIC countries, (3) the remaining "common" foods, and (4) "country-specific" foods. Compiled folate values were concurrently standardised in terms of unit, mode of expression and chemical analysis, using information in national food composition tables (FCT). 43-70% total folate values were documented as measured by microbiological assay. Foods reported in EPIC were either matched directly to FCT foods, treated as recipes or weighted averages. This work has produced the first standardised folate dataset in Europe, which was used to calculate folate intakes in EPIC; a prerequisite to study the relation between folate intake and diseases.

National Category
Food Science
Research subject
Natural Science, Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-51160 (URN)10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.11.044 (DOI)26433299 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-21 Created: 2016-03-21 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Hefni, M. E., Shalaby, M. T., Mohamed, R. A., Elwa, A. M. & Witthöft, C. M. (2016). Effect of a 12-Week Dietary Intervention with Folic Acid or Folate-Enhanced Foods on Folate Status in Healthy Egyptian Women. Food and Nutrition Sciences, 7, 1339-1351
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of a 12-Week Dietary Intervention with Folic Acid or Folate-Enhanced Foods on Folate Status in Healthy Egyptian Women
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2016 (English)In: Food and Nutrition Sciences, ISSN 2157-944X, E-ISSN 2157-9458, Vol. 7, p. 1339-1351Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Egyptian government introduced wheat-flour fortification with iron and folic acid to reduce the incidence of neural tube defects, but suspended it for technical reasons. We previously developed novel legume foods with enhanced folate content. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of 12-week intervention with folate-en- hanced foods versus folic acid supplement in improving folate status in Egyptian women. A randomized, parallel intervention trial with two active groups (n = 19, n = 18) and one blinded control group (n = 20) was executed over 12 weeks. Volunteers received either germinated legume foods and orange juice (≈250 μg/d folate) or folic acid supplement (500 μg/d) or apple juice (0 μg/d folate). Folate status was assessed by erythrocyte and plasma folate and total homocysteine (tHcy) at day 0, and after 8 and 12 weeks of intervention. After 12 weeks, mean plasma folate increased by 14 (P < 0.0001) and 12 (P < 0.0001) nmoL in the folic acid and food group, respectively. Erythrocyte folate concentration increased in the folic acid group from 614 to 912 (P < 0.0001) and in the food group from 631 to 914 nmoL (P < 0.0001). After 12 weeks, 90% of subjects in the folic acid group and 70% in the food group had erythrocyte folate concentrations exceeding 906 nmol/L. tHcy concentration was decreased by 20% (P = 0.007) and 18% (P = 0.006) in the folic acid and food group, respectively, but remained unchanged in the control group during intervention. Folate-enhanced foods effectively improve folate status in women of reproductive age. These foods could be used as a complement to folic acid fortification 

National Category
Food Science
Research subject
Natural Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-61370 (URN)10.4236/fns.2016.714122 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-03-14 Created: 2017-03-14 Last updated: 2018-05-17Bibliographically approved
Hefni, M. E. & Witthöft, C. M. (2016). Egyptian Legume and Cereal Foods: Traditional and New Methods for Processing. In: Rui M. S. Cruz, Margarida C. Vieira (Ed.), Mediterranean Foods: Composition and Processing (pp. 102-120). CRC Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Egyptian Legume and Cereal Foods: Traditional and New Methods for Processing
2016 (English)In: Mediterranean Foods: Composition and Processing / [ed] Rui M. S. Cruz, Margarida C. Vieira, CRC Press, 2016, p. 102-120Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CRC Press, 2016
National Category
Food Science
Research subject
Natural Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-61371 (URN)9781498740890 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-03-14 Created: 2017-03-14 Last updated: 2018-05-17Bibliographically approved
Witthöft, C. M. & Hefni, M. E. (2016). Folic acid and Folates: Physiology and Health Effects (1ed.). In: Caballero, B., Finglas, P., and Toldrá, F. (Ed.), The Encyclopedia of Food and Health: (pp. 724-730). Elsevier
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Folic acid and Folates: Physiology and Health Effects
2016 (English)In: The Encyclopedia of Food and Health / [ed] Caballero, B., Finglas, P., and Toldrá, F., Elsevier, 2016, 1, p. 724-730Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This article reviews briefly information regarding important food sources for folate, effects from storage and processing on folate content, and bioprocessing techniques that could provide foods with increased folate content. Thereafter, folate intake, absorption, metabolism, and bioavailability are also discussed. Finally, health effects associated with folate are presented briefly.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016 Edition: 1
Keywords
Absorption; Bioavailability; De novo synthesis; Dietary intake; Fermentation; Folate; Folic acid; Food processing; Fortification; Germination; Metabolism
National Category
Food Science
Research subject
Natural Science, Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-51201 (URN)10.1016/B978-0-12-384947-2.00300-7 (DOI)978-0-12-384953-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-03-21 Created: 2016-03-21 Last updated: 2018-05-17Bibliographically approved
Röös, E., Karlsson, H., Witthöft, C. M. & Sundberg, C. (2015). Evaluating the sustainability of diets-combining environmental and nutritional aspects. Environmental Science and Policy, 47, 157-166
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating the sustainability of diets-combining environmental and nutritional aspects
2015 (English)In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 47, p. 157-166Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examined two methods for jointly considering the environmental impact and nutritional quality of diets, which is necessary when designing policy instruments promoting sustainable food systems. Both methods included energy content and 18 macro- and micronutrients in the diet, the climate impact, land use and biodiversity damage potential. In Method 1, the content of different nutrients in the diet was normalised based on recommended intake or upper levels for average daily intake and presented together with the environmental impacts, which were normalised according to estimated sustainable levels. In Method 2, the nutritional quality of different diets was considered by calculating their nutrient density score, and the environmental impact was then expressed per nutrient density score. Three diets were assessed; a diet corresponding to Nordic recommendations, the current average Swedish diet and a lifestyle Low Carbohydrate-High Fat (LCHF) diet. Method 1 clearly showed that the climate impact was far beyond the sustainable level for all diets, while land use was within the sustainability limit for the recommended diet, but not the other two. Comparisons based on nutrient density scores depended on the score used, but the current and LCHF diets had more impact than the recommended diet (less livestock products) for all but one score. Over- and under-consumption of nutrients were clearly shown by Method 1 but not possible to distinguish with Method 2, as normalisation was not possible, making it difficult to evaluate the absolute scale of the impacts when nutrient density scores were used. For quantitative information on the environmental and nutritional impacts of diets as support in decision-making processes, it is important that data presentation is transparent. There is limited value in reducing results to a low number of indicators that are easy to read, but difficult to interpret, e.g. nutrient density score. Method 1 allows combined assessment of diets regarding environmental impact and nutritional intake and could be useful in dietary planning and in development of dietary recommendations and other policy instruments to achieve more sustainable food systems. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

National Category
Food Science
Research subject
Natural Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-51194 (URN)10.1016/j.envsci.2014.12.001 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-03-21 Created: 2016-03-21 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Hefni, M. E., Shalaby, M. T. & Witthöft, C. M. (2015). Folate content in faba beans (Vicia faba L.) - effects of cultivar, maturity stage, industrial processing, and bioprocessing. Food Science & Nutrition, 3(1), 65-73
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Folate content in faba beans (Vicia faba L.) - effects of cultivar, maturity stage, industrial processing, and bioprocessing
2015 (English)In: Food Science & Nutrition, E-ISSN 2048-7177, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 65-73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Faba beans are an important source of folate and commonly consumed in Egypt. This study examined the effects of Egyptian industrial food processing (e.g., canning and freezing), germination, cultivar, and maturity stages on folate content, with the aim to develop a candidate functional canned faba bean food with increased folate content. The folate content in four cultivars of green faba beans ranged from 110 to 130 μg 100 g(-1) fresh weight (535-620 μg 100 g(-1) dry matter [DM]), which was four- to sixfold higher than in dried seeds. Industrial canning of dried seeds resulted in significant folate losses of ∼20% (P = 0.004), while industrial freezing had no effect. Germination of faba beans increased the folate content by >40% (P < 0.0001). A novel industrial canning process involving pregermination of dried faba beans resulted in a net folate content of 194 μg 100 g(-1) DM, which is 52% more than in conventional canned beans. The consumption of green faba beans should be recommended, providing ∼120 μg dietary folate equivalents per 100 g/portion.

National Category
Food Science
Research subject
Natural Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-51169 (URN)10.1002/fsn3.192 (DOI)25650294 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-21 Created: 2016-03-21 Last updated: 2018-05-17Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0387-4312

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