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Ståhl, Ola
Publications (10 of 23) Show all publications
Ståhl, O., Tham, M. & Holtorf, C. (2017). Towards a Post-Anthropocentric Speculative Archaeology (through Design): . Journal of Contemporary Archaeology, 4(2), 238-246
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards a Post-Anthropocentric Speculative Archaeology (through Design):
2017 (English)In: Journal of Contemporary Archaeology, ISSN 2051-3429, E-ISSN 2051-3437, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 238-246Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As disciplines and practices archaeology and design stand in an interesting relationship to one another. Whereas it is the business of designers to construct material and, at times, immaterial universes that can sustain life (or, as we shall see, destroy life), it is the business of archaeologists, in the traditional sense of the word, to look at the remnants of those universes and the traces of those who populated them in order to understand the past and the ways in which it resonates in the present and in our conception of our possible futures.

This leads us to pose the following question: If an intimate relationship can be located at the interstitial space between archaeology and design, what might happen if we were to construct transversal lines between and across these disciplines, and what concepts would be required for us to do so?

Drawing upon the concept of the Anthropocene – a concept opening up to precisely such transdisciplinary and transversal approaches – this article explores the notion of a post-anthropocentric speculative archaeology interweaving a theoretical line of thought and a performative, fictive trajectory.

Keywords
Sustainability, Ai Weiwei, resilience
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-71265 (URN)10.1558/jca.32442 (DOI)000434439100013 ()
Note

Visual commentary by Cornelius Holtorf.

Available from: 2018-03-02 Created: 2018-03-02 Last updated: 2018-12-14Bibliographically approved
Ståhl, O. (2016). Kafka and Deleuze/Guattari: Towards a Creative Critical Writing Practice. Theory, Culture and Society. Explorations in Critical Social Science, 33(7-8), 221-235
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kafka and Deleuze/Guattari: Towards a Creative Critical Writing Practice
2016 (English)In: Theory, Culture and Society. Explorations in Critical Social Science, ISSN 0263-2764, E-ISSN 1460-3616, Vol. 33, no 7-8, p. 221-235Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Drawing upon the work of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, in particular their writing on Franz Kafka, this article stakes out the ground for a creative critical writing practice beyond the confines of literature. Exploring the notion of writing in relation to affect constellations, what causes one to write, and expressions without content, how one begins to write, the argument put forth is that in rethinking the distinction Deleuze and Guattari tend to make between artistic practice and philosophical thought, a space is opened up for transversal lines that may cross between these fields in practices that are creative and critical and involve what Deleuze and Guattari refer to as aesthetic figures as well as conceptual personae. These practices, it is argued, provide a potential link between aesthetics, on the one hand, and ethics and politics, on the other.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2016
Keywords
aesthetics, art writing, creative critical writing, Deleuze and Guattari, Franz Kafka
National Category
Literary Composition Philosophy
Research subject
Humanities, Creative writing; Social Sciences, Practical Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-50781 (URN)10.1177/0263276415625313 (DOI)000390858300011 ()2-s2.0-85006154208 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-03-15 Created: 2016-03-15 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Ståhl, O. (2016). Long Kesh: Site - Sign - Body. In: P. Lloyd & E. Bohemia (Ed.), Proceedings of DRS 2016, Design Research Society 50th Anniversary Conference: . Paper presented at DRS 2016, Design Research Society 50th Anniversary Conference (pp. 1191-2101). Brighton, 3
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long Kesh: Site - Sign - Body
2016 (English)In: Proceedings of DRS 2016, Design Research Society 50th Anniversary Conference / [ed] P. Lloyd & E. Bohemia, Brighton, 2016, Vol. 3, p. 1191-2101Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper engages with the former prison at Long Kesh in Belfast, Northern Ireland, and, in particular, with the republican inmates’ protests in the 1970s and early 80s. Addressing the penal institution itself, its architecture, interior designs and the rituals implemented there, the paper argues these were not only designed but involved on-going design processes to which inmates responded by the developing a complex design practice involving the site itself as well as their bodies and the way these are made to signify within the semiotic regime of the penal institution.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Brighton: , 2016
Series
Proceedings of DRS2016: Design + Research + Society - Future-Focused Thinking, ISSN 2398-3132 ; 3
Keywords
Design, Politics, Long Kesh, IRA, The Troubles, Prison Architecture
National Category
Design
Research subject
Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-55659 (URN)
Conference
DRS 2016, Design Research Society 50th Anniversary Conference
Available from: 2016-08-20 Created: 2016-08-20 Last updated: 2016-08-22Bibliographically approved
Tham, M., Arvidsson, A.-K., Blomqvist, M., Bonja, S., Hyltén-Cavallius, S., Håkansson, L., . . . Victor, O. (2016). Metadesigning Design Research: How can designers collaboratively grow a research platform?. In: Proceedings of DRS 2016, Design Research Society 50th Anniversary Conference: . Paper presented at DRS 2016, Design Research Society 50th Anniversary Conference (pp. 1412-1430). Brighton, Article ID 275.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metadesigning Design Research: How can designers collaboratively grow a research platform?
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Proceedings of DRS 2016, Design Research Society 50th Anniversary Conference, Brighton, 2016, p. 1412-1430, article id 275Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

‘How can we design a meaningful and relevant research platform that will support futures of sustainability?’ was the question guiding the two-and-a-half-year- long, co-creative and emergent metadesign process of establishing a new research platform at the Department of Design, Linnaeus University, Sweden. The meta focus on developing a whole research environment, as a design practice and design research endeavour, should be valuable for the design research community. Findings concern the viability of co-creative approaches in such a remit, negotiations of artistic/scientific research conventions, and the design institution’s position in the multi-disciplined university. The research has identified tensions and conflicts between the academic institution and construct, and the application of ontologies, epistemologies and methodologies deemed auspicious for sustainability endeavours. The paper itself is a collaborative effort between eleven of the researchers involved in developing the research platform.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Brighton: , 2016
Keywords
sustainability, metadesign, research environment, co-creative processes
National Category
Design
Research subject
Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-54672 (URN)
Conference
DRS 2016, Design Research Society 50th Anniversary Conference
Projects
Curious Design Change
Available from: 2016-07-21 Created: 2016-07-21 Last updated: 2018-05-18Bibliographically approved
Ståhl, O. & Hyltén-Cavallius, S. (2016). "Rituals of Care". In: Open Design for E-very-thing: exploring new design purposes. Paper presented at November 21 – 24, 2016 Hong Kong, China Hosted by the Hong Kong Design Institute (pp. 1-3).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Rituals of Care"
2016 (English)In: Open Design for E-very-thing: exploring new design purposes, 2016, p. 1-3Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A fashionable term at the moment used to describe the world that we now inhabit is the geological concept 'the Anthropocene.' Although the validity of the concept within geological discourse remains contested, it seems to have become a common albeit loosely defined term for a geological era following the Holocene defined by the (detrimental) impact of humanity - the Anthropos of the Anthropocene - on the geological strata of the planet.

Facing the Anthropocene, what we are called upon to do, is to find other ways of inhabiting our bodies - of being embodied - and other ways of collectively inhabiting the geosphere - of being, in a sense, embedded. This involves aesthetics and ethics; developing sensibilities, forms of attentiveness, and constructing, or designing, universes in which life can be sustained. In this task, the notion and practice of ritual, if retuned to face the Anthropocene, may come to play a most crucial role.

If we consider the etymology of the word 'ritual,' from early 14th Century Latin ritus, and detach it from its religious context, what we get is a sense of 'observance' taking the form of 'ceremony' but also the form of 'customs' and 'usages'; to be observant of and attentive to a principle or decree, manifests itself in the ceremonial as well as in the everyday; in the funerals and weddings as well as in the daily custom of brushing of one's teeth, or the usage of utensils for food consumption.

As for the origins of the Latin root itself, it has not been established with certainty. There is, however, a compelling argument linking it to a Proto-Indo-European word for 'reasoning' and 'counting;' two words that both involve a process of thought by which we make sense of the world.

Arguably, ritual today has little to do with thought and reflection, and more to do with habits and traditions, often problematic ones, and with activities that we do precisely without thinking, such as brushing our teeth. It is as if the link between observance, attention, and reflective thought, on the one hand, and ceremony, custom and usage, on the other, has been severed. We are no longer attentive to the rituals that make up the texture of the universes in and through which we live.

Now, our argument is not that we should return to a pastoral or archaic past where this would have been the case but we would like to propose two more speculative questions: First, what if we were to turn our thinking toward the rituals through which we construct a life in order to figure out what it is we are observant of and attentive to in the Anthropocene; what our ceremonies, customs and habitual uses of the things that surround actually mean? Second, what if we were to turn to ritual as a form of practical and speculative thinking in order to figure out how to construct universes for ourselves within the Anthropocene, in which life, in some fashion, can be sustained and enriched?

Ritual would then, perhaps, become the site of an emerging ethics (in the Greek sense [ethos], as having to do with 'habitual character' or 'disposition', or better perhaps, 'ways of living') and an emerging aesthetics (again, in the Greek sense [aisthanesthai], as having to do with aesthesis, perception, or the development of sensibilities and forms of attentiveness). Developing sensibilities and practices of attentiveness, and constructing ways of life on the basis of embodied and embedded, attentive experiences; another word for this might be 'care.'

Care is an interesting word that is often understood superficially in a sense closely associated with the word 'cure.' We care for the ill in order to restore them to health; we care for the poor by easing their suffering; we care for our children by offering them our protection and unconditional love. The two words 'care' and 'cure', however, have very different etymologies. Whereas the word 'cure' stems from a Latin root, cura, meaning 'healing, paying attention to,' the word 'care' has a Proto-Germanic root in a word that bears connotations such as 'lament,' 'loss,' and 'grief.' Residual use of the word in this sense can be found in phrases such as, 'she doesn't have a care in the world.'

Within the context of the Anthropocene, 'care' becomes a very interesting choice of word as the configuration of an ethical, or ethicoaesthetic site for new ways of living is defined by a sense of irrevocable loss. We live through a period of likely extinction that will require us to fundamentally rethink our understanding of what it means to be human beyond the Anthropos. What we stand before, then, is the task of finding out what it may mean to live a certain kind of extinction. This is an ethicoaesthetic task, and it is one premised on a sense of loss. We do have a care (a loss, a grief, a lament) and we do need to start caring for (paying attention to) the geosphere within which we construct our universes and to those with whom we labour in order to do so. This involves practicing 'care' and not least experimenting with the design of rituals of care. 

Keywords
rituals, ethico-aesthetics, sustainability
National Category
Design
Research subject
Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-61896 (URN)
Conference
November 21 – 24, 2016 Hong Kong, China Hosted by the Hong Kong Design Institute
Available from: 2017-03-27 Created: 2017-03-27 Last updated: 2017-04-05Bibliographically approved
Keshavarz, M., Snodgrass, E. & Ståhl, O. (2015). Manipulations: Artefact - Site - Space. In: Nordic Design Research Conference (NORDES) 2015: Design Ecologies Challenging anthropocentrism in the design of sustainable futures, June 7–10, 2015, Konstfack, Stockholm, Sweden. Paper presented at Nordic Design Research Conference 2015 : Design Ecologies Challenging anthropocentrism in the design of sustainable futures, June 7–10, 2015, Konstfack, Stockholm, Sweden (pp. 1-2). Stockholm: Nordes, 6
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Manipulations: Artefact - Site - Space
2015 (English)In: Nordic Design Research Conference (NORDES) 2015: Design Ecologies Challenging anthropocentrism in the design of sustainable futures, June 7–10, 2015, Konstfack, Stockholm, Sweden, Stockholm: Nordes , 2015, Vol. 6, p. 1-2Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This workshop gathers those who are interested in producing a set of responses to the concept of manipulation through a specific framework of design ecologies. The workshop will adapt a methodological approach linking artefact, site and space – an approach we hope will offer ample opportunity to explore manipulation both as a concept and a local and material practice that produces global effects.

Participants are invited to contribute with specific case studies of artefacts, sites and/or spaces, reading them up and against the notion of manipulation considered here not merely as an outcome of environments but also as a source of the production of environments.

The workshop is a part of MANIPULATIONS, an ongoing initiative in which scholars, researchers, artists and designers submit and discuss their investigations and explorations of the concept of manipulation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Nordes, 2015
Series
Nordes, ISSN 1604-9705 ; 6
Keywords
Design, Politics, Manipulation, Transdisciplinarity
National Category
Design
Research subject
Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-55670 (URN)
Conference
Nordic Design Research Conference 2015 : Design Ecologies Challenging anthropocentrism in the design of sustainable futures, June 7–10, 2015, Konstfack, Stockholm, Sweden
Projects
Manipulations
Available from: 2016-08-20 Created: 2016-08-20 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
Chapman, N. & Ståhl, O. (2014). Day. In: Nico Dockx, Clara Meister (Ed.), A Poem A Day: . Stockmans Kalendars & Curious
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Day
2014 (English)In: A Poem A Day / [ed] Nico Dockx, Clara Meister, Stockmans Kalendars & Curious , 2014Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) [Artistic work]
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockmans Kalendars & Curious, 2014
Keywords
Creative Writing, Performative Writing
National Category
Literary Composition
Research subject
Humanities, Creative writing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-55667 (URN)
Projects
The Outlands
Available from: 2016-08-20 Created: 2016-08-20 Last updated: 2017-03-03Bibliographically approved
Keshavarz, M., Snodgrass, E. & Ståhl, O. (2014). Manipulations platform. MANIPULATIONS
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Manipulations platform
2014 (English)Other (Other academic) [Artistic work]
Place, publisher, year, pages
MANIPULATIONS, 2014
Series
MANIPULATIONS, ISSN 2002-0899
Keywords
manipulation, art, design, politics
National Category
Design
Research subject
Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-69327 (URN)
Available from: 2017-12-15 Created: 2017-12-15 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
Chapman, N. & Ståhl, O. (2013). Earth Motifs, Shallow Designs, Outlands. Malmö: Publication Studio
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Earth Motifs, Shallow Designs, Outlands
2013 (English)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) [Artistic work]
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Malmö: Publication Studio, 2013. p. 27
Series
Landscapes
Keywords
Creative Critical Writing, Performative Writing
National Category
Literary Composition
Research subject
Humanities, Creative writing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-55666 (URN)978-91-977853-9-6 (ISBN)
External cooperation:
Projects
The Outlands
Available from: 2016-08-20 Created: 2016-08-20 Last updated: 2016-08-25Bibliographically approved
Ståhl, O. (2013). Film (PoDed.). Malmö: Krets & Publication Studio
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Film
2013 (English)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) [Artistic work]
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Malmö: Krets & Publication Studio, 2013. p. 421 Edition: PoD
Keywords
Performative writing, Fine art, Literature
National Category
General Literature Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-33467 (URN)978-91-87577-04-8 (ISBN)
Note

Published as a part of the exhibition F I L M by Ola Ståhl & Cassandra Troyan at KRETS (10.19 – 11.17.2013).

Available from: 2014-03-31 Created: 2014-03-31 Last updated: 2014-06-02Bibliographically approved
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