lnu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Gaillard, Marie-JoséORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2025-410X
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 158) Show all publications
Li, F., Gaillard, M.-J., Xu, Q., Bunting, M. J., Li, Y., Li, J., . . . Shen, W. (2018). A Review of Relative Pollen Productivity Estimates From Temperate China for Pollen-Based Quantitative Reconstruction of Past Plant Cover. Frontiers in Plant Science, 9, Article ID 1214.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Review of Relative Pollen Productivity Estimates From Temperate China for Pollen-Based Quantitative Reconstruction of Past Plant Cover
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Plant Science, ISSN 1664-462X, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 9, article id 1214Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Model-based quantitative reconstruction of past plant cover in Europe has shown great potential for: (i) testing hypotheses related to Holocene vegetation dynamics, biodiversity, and their relationships with climate and land use; (ii) studying long term interactions between climate and land use. Similar model-based quantitative reconstruction of plant cover in China has been restricted due to the lack of standardized datasets of existing estimates of relative pollen productivity (RPP). This study presents the first synthesis of all RPP values available to date for 39 major plant taxa from temperate China and proposes standardized RPP datasets that can be used for model-based quantitative reconstructions of past plant cover using fossil pollen records for the region. We review 11 RPP studies in temperate China based on modern pollen and related vegetation data around the pollen samples. The study areas include meadow, steppe and desert vegetation, various woodland types, and cultural landscapes. We evaluate the strategies of each study in terms of selection of study areas and distribution of study sites; pollen- and vegetation-data collection in field; vegetation-data collection from satellite images and vegetation maps; and data analysis. We compare all available RPP estimates, select values based on precise rules and calculate mean RPP estimates. We propose two standardized RPP datasets for 31 (Alt1) and 29 (Alt2) plant taxa. The ranking of mean RPPs (Alt-2) relative to Poaceae (= 1) for eight major taxa is: Artemisia (21) > Pinus (18.4) > Betula (12.5) > Castanea (11.5) > Elaeagnaceae (8.8) > Juglans (7.5) > Compositae (4.5) > Amaranthaceae/Chenopodiaceae (4). We conclude that although RPPs are comparable between Europe and China for some genera and families, they can differ very significantly, e.g., Artemisia, Compositae, and Amaranthaceae/Chenopodiaceae. For some taxa, we present the first RPP estimates e.g. Castanea, Elaeagnaceae, and Juglans. The proposed standardized RPP datasets are essential for model-based reconstructions of past plant cover using fossil pollen records from temperate China.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
Extended R-Value (ERV) model, relevant source area of pollen (RSAP), fall speed of pollen (FSP), vegetation-data collection, modern pollen sampling
National Category
Ecology Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Science, Paleoecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77719 (URN)10.3389/fpls.2018.01214 (DOI)000443717800001 ()
Available from: 2018-09-13 Created: 2018-09-13 Last updated: 2018-09-13Bibliographically approved
Marchant, R., Richer, S., Boles, O., Capitani, C., Courtney-Mustaphi, C. J., Lane, P., . . . Wright, D. (2018). Drivers and trajectories of land cover change in East Africa: Human and environmental interactions from 6000 years ago to present. Earth-Science Reviews, 178, 322-378
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Drivers and trajectories of land cover change in East Africa: Human and environmental interactions from 6000 years ago to present
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Earth-Science Reviews, ISSN 0012-8252, E-ISSN 1872-6828, Vol. 178, p. 322-378Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

East African landscapes today are the result of the cumulative effects of climate and land-use change over millennial timescales. In this review, we compile archaeological and palaeoenvironmental data from East Africa to document land-cover change, and environmental, subsistence and land-use transitions, over the past 6000 years. Throughout East Africa there have been a series of relatively rapid and high-magnitude environmental shifts characterised by changing hydrological budgets during the mid- to late Holocene. For example, pronounced environmental shifts that manifested as a marked change in the rainfall amount or seasonality and subsequent hydrological budget throughout East Africa occurred around 4000, 800 and 300 radiocarbon years before present (yr BP). The past 6000 years have also seen numerous shifts in human interactions with East African ecologies. From the mid-Holocene, land use has both diversified and increased exponentially, this has been associated with the arrival of new subsistence systems, crops, migrants and technologies, all giving rise to a sequence of significant phases of land-cover change. The first large-scale human influences began to occur around 4000 yr BP, associated with the introduction of domesticated livestock and the expansion of pastoral communities. The first widespread and intensive forest clearances were associated with the arrival of iron-using early farming communities around 2500 yr BP, particularly in productive and easily-cleared mid-altitudinal areas. Extensive and pervasive land-cover change has been associated with population growth, immigration and movement of people. The expansion of trading routes between the interior and the coast, starting around 1300 years ago and intensifying in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries CE, was one such process. These caravan routes possibly acted as conduits for spreading New World crops such as maize (Zea mays), tobacco (Nicotiana spp.) and tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum), although the processes and timings of their introductions remains poorly documented. The introduction of southeast Asian domesticates, especially banana (Musa spp.), rice (Oryza spp.), taro (Colocasia esculenta), and chicken (Gallus gallus), via transoceanic biological transfers around and across the Indian Ocean, from at least around 1300 yr BP, and potentially significantly earlier, also had profound social and ecological consequences across parts of the region. Through an interdisciplinary synthesis of information and metadatasets, we explore the different drivers and directions of changes in land-cover, and the associated environmental histories and interactions with various cultures, technologies, and subsistence strategies through time and across space in East Africa. This review suggests topics for targeted future research that focus on areas and/or time periods where our understanding of the interactions between people, the environment and land-cover change are most contentious and/or poorly resolved. The review also offers a perspective on how knowledge of regional land-use change can be used to inform and provide perspectives on contemporary issues such as climate and ecosystem change models, conservation strategies, and the achievement of nature-based solutions for development purposes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Archaeology, Iron technology, Pottery, Pastoralism, Agriculture, Livelihoods, Palaeoenvironments, Savannah, LandCover6k, Sustainable Development Goals, Land use
National Category
Ecology Archaeology
Research subject
Environmental Science, Paleoecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-76781 (URN)10.10164/j.earscirev.2017.12.010 (DOI)000430774000014 ()
Available from: 2018-07-11 Created: 2018-07-11 Last updated: 2018-07-11Bibliographically approved
Roberts, N., Fyfe, R. M., Woodbridge, J., Gaillard, M.-J., Davis, B. A., Kaplan, J. O., . . . Leydet, M. (2018). Europe's lost forests: a pollen-based synthesis for the last 11,000 years. Scientific Reports, 8, Article ID 716.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Europe's lost forests: a pollen-based synthesis for the last 11,000 years
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 716Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

8000 years ago, prior to Neolithic agriculture, Europe was mostly a wooded continent. Since then, its forest cover has been progressively fragmented, so that today it covers less than half of Europe's land area, in many cases having been cleared to make way for fields and pasture-land. Establishing the origin of Europe's current, more open land-cover mosaic requires a long-term perspective, for which pollen analysis offers a key tool. In this study we utilise and compare three numerical approaches to transforming pollen data into past forest cover, drawing on >1000 C-14-dated site records. All reconstructions highlight the different histories of the mixed temperate and the northern boreal forests, with the former declining progressively since similar to 6000 years ago, linked to forest clearance for agriculture in later prehistory (especially in northwest Europe) and early historic times (e.g. in north central Europe). In contrast, extensive human impact on the needle-leaf forests of northern Europe only becomes detectable in the last two millennia and has left a larger area of forest in place. Forest loss has been a dominant feature of Europe's landscape ecology in the second half of the current interglacial, with consequences for carbon cycling, ecosystem functioning and biodiversity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Science, Paleoecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-70569 (URN)10.1038/s41598-017-18646-7 (DOI)000422636400020 ()29335417 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-07 Created: 2018-02-07 Last updated: 2018-02-07Bibliographically approved
Pirzamanbein, B., Lindström, J., Poska, A. & Gaillard, M.-J. (2018). Modelling Spatial Compositional Data: Reconstructions of past land cover and uncertainties. Spatial Statistics, 24, 14-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modelling Spatial Compositional Data: Reconstructions of past land cover and uncertainties
2018 (English)In: Spatial Statistics, E-ISSN 2211-6753, Vol. 24, p. 14-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper we construct a hierarchical model for spatial compositional data which is used to reconstruct past land-cover compositions (in terms of coniferous forest, broadleaved forest, and unforested/open land) for five time periods during the past 6000 years over Europe. The model consists of a Gaussian Markov Random Field (GMRF) with Dirichlet observations. A block updated Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), including an adaptive Metropolis adjusted Langevin step, is used to estimate model parameters. The sparse precision matrix in the GMRF provides computational advantages leading to a fast MCMC algorithm. Reconstructions are obtained by combining pollen-based estimates of vegetation cover at a limited number of locations with scenarios of past deforestation and output from a dynamic vegetation model. To evaluate uncertainties in the predictions a novel way of constructing joint confidence regions for the entire composition at each prediction location is proposed. The hierarchical model's ability to reconstruct past land cover is evaluated through cross validation for all time periods, and by comparing reconstructions for the recent past to a present day European forest map. The evaluation results are promising, and the model is able to capture known structures in past land-cover compositions. (C) 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Gaussian Markov Random Field, Dinchlet observation, Adaptive Metropolis adjusted Langevin, Pollen records, Confidence regions
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Science, Paleoecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-76853 (URN)10.1016/j.spasta.2018.03.005 (DOI)000432788000002 ()
Available from: 2018-07-13 Created: 2018-07-13 Last updated: 2018-07-13Bibliographically approved
Gaillard, M.-J., Berglund, B. E., Birks, H. J., Edwards, K. J. & Bittmann, F. (2018). "Think horizontally, act vertically": the centenary (1916-2016) of pollen analysis and the legacy of Lennart von Post. Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, 27(2), 267-269
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Think horizontally, act vertically": the centenary (1916-2016) of pollen analysis and the legacy of Lennart von Post
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, ISSN 0939-6314, E-ISSN 1617-6278, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 267-269Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Science, Paleoecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-71549 (URN)10.1007/s00334-017-0656-5 (DOI)000425529400001 ()
Available from: 2018-03-16 Created: 2018-03-16 Last updated: 2018-03-16Bibliographically approved
Kaplan, J. O., Krumhardt, K. M., Gaillard, M.-J., Sugita, S., Trondman, A.-K., Fyfe, R., . . . Nielsen, A. B. (2017). Constraining the Deforestation History of Europe: Evaluation of Historical Land Use Scenarios with Pollen-Based Land Cover Reconstructions. Land, 6(4), Article ID 91.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Constraining the Deforestation History of Europe: Evaluation of Historical Land Use Scenarios with Pollen-Based Land Cover Reconstructions
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Land, ISSN 2073-445X, E-ISSN 2073-445X, Vol. 6, no 4, article id 91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Anthropogenic land cover change (ALCC) is the most important transformation of the Earth system that occurred in the preindustrial Holocene, with implications for carbon, water and sediment cycles, biodiversity and the provision of ecosystem services and regional and global climate. For example, anthropogenic deforestation in preindustrial Eurasia may have led to feedbacks to the climate system: both biogeophysical, regionally amplifying winter cold and summer warm temperatures, and biogeochemical, stabilizing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and thus influencing global climate. Quantification of these effects is difficult, however, because scenarios of anthropogenic land cover change over the Holocene vary widely, with increasing disagreement back in time. Because land cover change had such widespread ramifications for the Earth system, it is essential to assess current ALCC scenarios in light of observations and provide guidance on which models are most realistic. Here, we perform a systematic evaluation of two widely-used ALCC scenarios (KK10 and HYDE3.1) in northern and part of central Europe using an independent, pollen-based reconstruction of Holocene land cover (REVEALS). Considering that ALCC in Europe primarily resulted in deforestation, we comparemodeled land use with the cover of non-forest vegetation inferred from the pollen data. Though neither land cover change scenario matches the pollen-based reconstructions precisely, KK10 correlates well with REVEALS at the country scale, while HYDE systematically underestimates land use with increasing magnitude with time in the past. Discrepancies between modeled and reconstructed land use are caused by a number of factors, including assumptions of per-capita land use and socio-cultural factors that cannot be predicted on the basis of the characteristics of the physical environment, including dietary preferences, long-distance trade, the location of urban areas and social organization.

Keywords
land use, paleoecology, environmental history, human-environment interactions
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Environmental Science, Paleoecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72110 (URN)10.3390/land6040091 (DOI)000419224200026 ()
Available from: 2018-04-04 Created: 2018-04-04 Last updated: 2018-04-04Bibliographically approved
Li, F., Zhao, Y., Gaillard, M.-J., Li, H., Sun, J. & Xu, Q. (2017). Modern pollen–€“climate relationships in north Xinjiang, northwestern China: Implications for pollen-based reconstruction of Holocene climate. The Holocene, 27(7), 951-966
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modern pollen–€“climate relationships in north Xinjiang, northwestern China: Implications for pollen-based reconstruction of Holocene climate
Show others...
2017 (English)In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 951-966Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fossil pollen records are widely used to reconstruct past climate. Such reconstructions require that the relationships between pollen assemblages, vegetation, and climate are well understood. These can be studied in present circumstances given we assume that modern vegetation and climate are analogous to past ones. In this study, we analyze pollen–vegetation–climate relationships in the Jungar desert and Altay Mountains, northwestern China, a region for which careful reconstruction of past climate is needed to answer unsolved questions on past climate in an area located at the boundary between two different climate regimes (westerlies and monsoon). We use a dataset of 66 surface pollen samples from forest, meadow, steppe, and desert vegetation and six related climate variables, Tann, TJan, TJul, Pann, PJan, and PJul. Principal components analysis, redundancy analysis, Monte Carlo permutation tests, and variation partitioning are applied to quantify these relationships. We also assess pollen ratios as indices of aridity. We find that (1) Pann is the major climatic factor influencing pollen assemblages, followed by PJul, (2) the two variables are not correlated, and (3) the shared effect of (1) PJan and PJul, (2) PJan and Pann, (3) PJul and Tann, and (4) Tann, TJan, and TJul explains a larger portion of the variation in pollen data than the individual effect of each variable. Therefore, robust pollen–climate transfer functions can be developed for Pann and PJul, and several climate variables treated in combination. Artemisia/Chenopodiaceae is a strong index of aridity and Artemisia/Gramineae might be a useful index of Pann and PJul.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Science, Paleoecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-59570 (URN)10.1177/0959683616678464 (DOI)000406530800004 ()
Available from: 2017-01-03 Created: 2017-01-03 Last updated: 2018-02-06Bibliographically approved
Marquer, L., Gaillard, M.-J., Sugita, S., Poska, A., Trondman, A.-K., Mazier, F., . . . Seppa, H. (2017). Quantifying the effects of land use and climate on Holocene vegetation in Europe. Quaternary Science Reviews, 171, 20-37
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantifying the effects of land use and climate on Holocene vegetation in Europe
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Quaternary Science Reviews, ISSN 0277-3791, E-ISSN 1873-457X, Vol. 171, p. 20-37Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Early agriculture can be detected in palaeovegetation records, but quantification of the relative importance of climate and land use in influencing regional vegetation composition since the onset of agriculture is a topic that is rarely addressed. We present a novel approach that combines pollen-based REVEALS estimates of plant cover with climate, anthropogenic land-cover and dynamic vegetation modelling results. This is used to quantify the relative impacts of land use and climate on Holocene vegetation at a sub-continental scale, i.e. northern and western Europe north of the Alps. We use redundancy analysis and variation partitioning to quantify the percentage of variation in vegetation composition explained by the climate and land-use variables, and Monte Carlo permutation tests to assess the statistical significance of each variable. We further use a similarity index to combine pollen based REVEALS estimates with climate-driven dynamic vegetation modelling results. The overall results indicate that climate is the major driver of vegetation when the Holocene is considered as a whole and at the sub-continental scale, although land use is important regionally. Four critical phases of land-use effects on vegetation are identified. The first phase (from 7000 to 6500 BP) corresponds to the early impacts on vegetation of farming and Neolithic forest clearance and to the dominance of climate as a driver of vegetation change. During the second phase (from 4500 to 4000 BP), land use becomes a major control of vegetation. Climate is still the principal driver, although its influence decreases gradually. The third phase (from 2000 to 1500 BP) is characterised by the continued role of climate on vegetation as a consequence of late-Holocene climate shifts and specific climate events that influence vegetation as well as land use. The last phase (from 500 to 350 BP) shows an acceleration of vegetation changes, in particular during the last century, caused by new farming practices and forestry in response to population growth and industrialization. This is a unique signature of anthropogenic impact within the Holocene but European vegetation remains climatically sensitive and thus may continue to respond to ongoing climate change. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Pergamon Press, 2017
Keywords
Climate, Holocene, Human impact, Land use, LPJ-GUESS, Europe, Pollen, REVEALS, Vegetation composition
National Category
Ecology Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Science, Paleoecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-68286 (URN)10.1016/j.quascirev.2017.07.001 (DOI)000410869400002 ()
Available from: 2017-10-11 Created: 2017-10-11 Last updated: 2017-10-11Bibliographically approved
Li, F., Gaillard, M.-J., Sugita, S., Mazier, F., Xu, Q., Zhou, Z., . . . Laffly, D. (2017). Relative pollen productivity estimates for major plant taxa of cultural landscapes in central eastern China. Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, 26(6), 587-605
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relative pollen productivity estimates for major plant taxa of cultural landscapes in central eastern China
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, ISSN 0939-6314, E-ISSN 1617-6278, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 587-605Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study we estimate relative pollen productivity (RPP) for plant taxa characteristic of human-induced vegetation in ancient cultural landscapes of the low mountain ranges of Shandong province in eastern temperate China. RPP estimates are required to achieve pollen-based reconstructions of Holocene plant cover using modelling approaches based on Prentice's and Sugita's theoretical background and models (REVEALS and LOVE). Pollen counts in moss samples and vegetation data from 36 sites were used in the Extended R-Value (ERV) model to estimate the relevant source area of pollen (RSAP) of moss polsters and RPP of major plant taxa. The best results were obtained with the ERV sub-model 3 and Prentice's taxon-specific method (using a Gaussian Plume dispersal model) to distance weight vegetation data. RSAP was estimated to 145 m using the maximum likelihood method. RPP was obtained for 18 taxa of which two taxa had unreliable RPP (Amaranthaceae/Chenopodiaceae and Vitex negundo). RPPs for Castanea, Cupressaceae, Robinia/Sophora, Aster/Anthemis-type, Cannabis/Humulus, Caryophyllaceae, Brassicaceae and Galium-type are the first ones for China. Trees, except Robinia/Sophora (RPP = 0.78 +/- 0.03) have larger RPPs than herbs other than Artemisia (RPP = 24.7 +/- 0.36). The RPPs for Quercus, Pinus and Artemisia are comparable with other RPPs obtained in China, the RPPs for Pinus, Quercus, Ulmus, Cyperaceae and Galium-type with the mean RPPs obtained in Europe, and RPP for Cupressaceae with that for Juniperus in Europe. The values for Aster/Anthemis-type, Caryophyllaceae, Asteraceae SF Cichorioideae and Juglans differ from the few RPPs available in China and/or Europe.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Science, Paleoecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-59571 (URN)10.1007/s00334-017-0636-9 (DOI)000413944100003 ()
Available from: 2017-01-03 Created: 2017-01-03 Last updated: 2017-11-22Bibliographically approved
Trondman, A.-K., Gaillard, M.-J., Sugita, S., Björkman, L., Greisman, A., Tove, H., . . . Mazier, F. (2016). Are pollen records from small sites appropriate for REVEALS model-based quantitative reconstructions of past regional vegetation?: An empirical test in southern Sweden. Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, 25(2), 131-151
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are pollen records from small sites appropriate for REVEALS model-based quantitative reconstructions of past regional vegetation?: An empirical test in southern Sweden
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, ISSN 0939-6314, E-ISSN 1617-6278, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 131-151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper we test the performance of the Regional Estimates of VEgetation Abundance from Large Sites (REVEALS) model using pollen records from multiple small sites. We use Holocene pollen records from large and small sites in southern Sweden to identify what is/are the most significant variable(s) affecting the REVEALS-based reconstructions, i.e. type of site (lakes and/or bogs), number of sites, site size, site location in relation to vegetation zones, and/or distance between small sites and large sites. To achieve this objective we grouped the small sites according to (i) the two major modern vegetation zones of the study region, and (ii) the distance between the small sites and large lakes, i.e. small sites within 50, 100, 150, or 200 km of the large lakes. The REVEALS-based reconstructions were performed using 24 pollen taxa. Redundancy analysis was performed on the results from all REVEALS-model runs using the groups within (i) and (ii) separately, and on the results from all runs using the groups within (ii) together. The explanatory power and significance of the variables were identified using forward selection and Monte Carlo permutation tests. The results show that (a) although the REVEALS model was designed for pollen data from large lakes, it also performs well with pollen data from multiple small sites in reconstructing the percentage cover of groups of plant taxa (e.g. open land taxa, summer-green trees, evergreen trees) or individual plant taxa; however, in the case of this study area, the reconstruction of the percentage cover of Calluna vulgaris, Cyperaceae, and Betula may be problematic when using small bogs; (b) standard errors of multiple small-site REVEALS estimates will generally be larger than those obtained using pollen records from large lakes, and they will decrease with increasing size of pollen counts and increasing number of small sites; (c) small lakes are better to use than small bogs if the total number of small sites is low; and (d) the size of small sites and the distance between them do not play a major role, but the distance between the small sites and landscape/vegetation boundaries is a determinant factor for the accuracy of the vegetation reconstructions.

Keywords
REVEALS model, Pollen data, Vegetation cover, Empirical test, Holocene, Southern Sweden
National Category
Archaeology Geology Environmental Sciences related to Agriculture and Land-use
Research subject
Environmental Science, Paleoecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-51745 (URN)10.1007/s00334-015-0536-9 (DOI)000373747600003 ()2-s2.0-84957974276 (Scopus ID)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2016-03-31 Created: 2016-03-31 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2025-410X

Search in DiVA

Show all publications