lnu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Årestedt, KristoferORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0961-5250
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 216) Show all publications
Agerström, J., Andréll, C., Bremer, A., Strömberg, A., Årestedt, K. & Israelsson, J. (2024). All else equal: Examining treatment bias and stereotypes based on patient ethnicity and socioeconomic status using in-hospital cardiac arrest clinical vignettes. Heart & Lung, 63, 86-91
Open this publication in new window or tab >>All else equal: Examining treatment bias and stereotypes based on patient ethnicity and socioeconomic status using in-hospital cardiac arrest clinical vignettes
Show others...
2024 (English)In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 63, p. 86-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BackgroundResearch on ethnic and socioeconomic treatment differences following in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) largely draws on register data. Due to the correlational nature of such data, it cannot be concluded whether detected differences reflect treatment bias/discrimination – whereby otherwise identical patients are treated differently solely due to sociodemographic factors. To be able to establish discrimination, experimental research is needed.ObjectiveThe primary aim of this experimental study was to examine whether simulated IHCA patients receive different treatment recommendations based on ethnicity and socioeconomic status (SES), holding all other factors (e.g., health status) constant. Another aim was to examine health care professionals’ (HCP) stereotypical beliefs about these groups.MethodsHCP (N = 235) working in acute care made anonymous treatment recommendations while reading IHCA clinical vignettes wherein the patient's ethnicity (Swedish vs. Middle Eastern) and SES had been manipulated. Afterwards they estimated to what extent hospital staff associate these patient groups with certain traits (stereotypes).ResultsNo significant differences in treatment recommendations for Swedish versus Middle Eastern or high versus low SES patients were found. Reported stereotypes about Middle Eastern patients were uniformly negative. SES-related stereotypes, however, were mixed. High SES patients were believed to be more competent (e.g., respected), but less warm (e.g., friendly) than low SES patients.ConclusionsSwedish HCP do not seem to discriminate against patients with Middle Eastern or low SES backgrounds when recommending treatment for simulated IHCA cases, despite the existence of negative stereotypes about these groups. Implications for health care equality and quality are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-124935 (URN)10.1016/j.hrtlng.2023.09.011 (DOI)001097657300001 ()2-s2.0-85174048692 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-28 Created: 2023-09-28 Last updated: 2024-01-11Bibliographically approved
Kneck, Å., Ewertzon, M., Leksell, J., Årestedt, K. & Amsberg, S. (2024). I have never been invited - A cross-sectional explorative study of family members' experiences of encounters with healthcare professionals in diabetes care. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 38(1), 82-91
Open this publication in new window or tab >>I have never been invited - A cross-sectional explorative study of family members' experiences of encounters with healthcare professionals in diabetes care
Show others...
2024 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 82-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To explore the experiences of family members of adult persons with type 1 diabetes concerning both the approach of healthcare professionals and feelings of alienation in encounters with professional diabetes care. Methods: A cross-sectional explorative quantitative and qualitative design. The Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire-Revised (FIAQ-R), including an open-ended question, was answered by 37 family members of adult persons with type 1 diabetes. Analyses included descriptive statistics and qualitative analysis. The study has received ethical approval. Results: Family members rated the approach of the healthcare professionals as being somewhat positive and considered that the approach towards them is important. They only felt partially alienated from the professional care. Qualitative data revealed that the family members often lacked direct access to the professional care and that their involvement was dependent on their relationship with the person with diabetes. Findings highlighted that the family members' wish to be involved in the care was sometimes unanswered. Conclusion: Based on the findings, it is reasonable to stress the importance of considering family members' perspectives and involving them in diabetes care to improve overall patient support.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
alienation, diabetes, experience of approach, family member, involvement, participation
National Category
Nursing Endocrinology and Diabetes
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-123887 (URN)10.1111/scs.13197 (DOI)001040964100001 ()37526063 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85166532289 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-25 Created: 2023-08-25 Last updated: 2024-02-27Bibliographically approved
Tallhage, S., Årestedt, K., Schildmeijer, K. & Oscarsson, M. (2024). Incidence and risk factors for umbilical cord prolapse in labor when amniotomy is used and with spontaneous rupture of membranes: A Swedish nationwide register study. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 103(2), 304-312
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Incidence and risk factors for umbilical cord prolapse in labor when amniotomy is used and with spontaneous rupture of membranes: A Swedish nationwide register study
2024 (English)In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 103, no 2, p. 304-312Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

IntroductionUmbilical cord prolapse (UCP) is a rare but severe obstetric complication in the presence of a rupture of the membranes. Although it is not possible to prevent a spontaneous rupture of the membranes (SROM), it is possible to prevent an amniotomy, which is a commonly used intervention in labor. This study aimed to explore the incidence and risk factors that are associated with UCP in labor when amniotomy is used vs SROM.Material and methodsA retrospective nationwide register study was conducted of all births in Sweden from January 2014 to June 2020 that were included in the Swedish Pregnancy Register (n = 717 336). The main outcome, UCP, was identified in the data by the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) diagnosis code O69.0. Multiple binary logistic regression analysis was used to identify the risk factors.ResultsAmniotomy was performed in 230 699 (43.6%) of all pregnancies. A UCP occurred in 293 (0.13%) of these cases. SROM occurred in 298 192 (56.4%) of all cases, of which 352 (0.12%) were complicated by UCP. Risk factors that increased the odds of UCP for both amniotomy and SROM were: higher parity, non-cephalic presentation and an induction of labor. Greater gestational age reduced the odds of UCP. Risk factors associated with only amniotomy were previous cesarean section and the presence of polyhydramnios. Identified risk factors for UCP in labor with SROM were a higher maternal age and maternal origin outside of the EU.ConclusionsUCP is a rare complication in Sweden. Beyond confirming the previously recognized risk factors, this study found induction of labor and previous cesarean section to be risk factors in labor when amniotomy is used. This is the largest study examining the incidence of umbilical cord prolapse (UCP) and its risk factors in labors when an amniotomy is used and those with a spontaneous rupture of membranes. The incidence of UCP was similar for both labors with an amniotomy and those with a spontaneous rupture of membranes. This study confirms previously recognized risk factors for UCP and identifies some differences in risk factors between labors with amniotomy and those with a spontaneous rupture of membranes.image

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
amniotomy, induction of labor, labor interventions, risk factors, spontaneous labor, umbilical cord prolapse
National Category
Nursing Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-125930 (URN)10.1111/aogs.14717 (DOI)001102591100001 ()37969005 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85176917921 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-12-08 Created: 2023-12-08 Last updated: 2024-02-27Bibliographically approved
Norinder, M., Årestedt, K., Axelsson, L., Grande, G., Ewing, G. & Alvariza, A. (2024). Increased preparedness for caregiving among family caregivers in specialized home care by using the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool Intervention. Paper presented at 2024;22(2):236-242. Palliative & Supportive Care, 22(2), 236-242
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increased preparedness for caregiving among family caregivers in specialized home care by using the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool Intervention
Show others...
2024 (English)In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 236-242Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ObjectivesFamily caregivers often feel insufficiently prepared for a caregiving role, experiencing challenges and demands related to care at home that may negatively affect their own quality of life. Supportive interventions have been shown to influence negative effects, but more studies are needed. Therefore, this study aims to explore potential effects of the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool Intervention on preparedness, caregiver burden, and quality of life among Swedish family caregivers in specialized home care. MethodsThe study had a pre-post intervention design and was conducted at 6 specialized home care services in Sweden. Family caregivers who received the intervention completed a questionnaire, including the Preparedness for caregiving scale, Caregiver Burden Scale, and Quality of Life in Life-Threatening Illness - Family carer version, at 2 time points, baseline and follow up, about 5 weeks later. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. ResultsAltogether, 33 family caregivers completed the baseline and follow-up assessment. A majority were retired (n = 26, 81%) and women (n = 19, 58%) and two-fifths had a university degree (n = 13, 41%). The family caregivers had significantly increased their preparedness for caregiving between the baseline and follow-up assessment (Mdn = 18 vs. 20, p = 0.002). No significant changes were found on caregiver burden or quality of life. Significance of resultsThe results add to knowledge regarding the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool Intervention's potential to improve family caregiver outcomes. Findings suggest that the intervention may be used to improve the preparedness for caregiving and support among family caregivers in specialized home care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2024
Keywords
Caregivers, Home care, Intervention, Palliative, Preparedness
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-123513 (URN)10.1017/S1478951523000639 (DOI)001006030700001 ()37278216 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85162003089 (Scopus ID)
Conference
2024;22(2):236-242
Available from: 2023-08-09 Created: 2023-08-09 Last updated: 2024-02-27Bibliographically approved
Ljungholm, L., Årestedt, K., Fagerström, C., Djukanovic, I. & Ekstedt, M. (2024). Measuring patients' experiences of continuity of care in a primary care context - Development and evaluation of a patient-reported experience measure. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 80(1), 387-398
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measuring patients' experiences of continuity of care in a primary care context - Development and evaluation of a patient-reported experience measure
Show others...
2024 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 80, no 1, p. 387-398Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BackgroundContinuity of care is viewed as a hallmark of high-quality care in the primary care context. Measures to evaluate the quality of provider performance are scarce, and it is unclear how the assessments correlate with patients' experiences of care as coherent and interconnected over time, consistent with their preferences and care needs.AimTo develop and evaluate a patient-reported experience measure of continuity of care in primary care for patients with complex care needs.MethodThe study was conducted in two stages: (1) development of the instrument based on theory and empirical studies and reviewed for content validity (16 patients with complex care needs and 8 experts) and (2) psychometric evaluation regarding factor structure, test-retest reliability, internal consistency reliability, and convergent validity. In all, 324 patients participated in the psychometric evaluation.ResultsThe Patient Experienced Continuity of care Questionnaire (PECQ) contains 20 items clustered in four dimensions of continuity of care measuring Information (four items), Relation (six items), Management (five items), and Knowledge (five items). Overall, the hypothesized factor structure was indicated. The PECQ also showed satisfactory convergent validity, internal consistency, and stability.Conclusion/ImplicationsThe PECQ is a multidimensional patient experience instrument that can provide information on various dimensions useful for driving quality improvement strategies in the primary care context for patients with complex care needs.Patient or Public ContributionPatients have participated in the content validation of the items.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
classic test theory, complex care needs, continuity of care, instrument development, primary healthcare, psychometric evaluation
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-123645 (URN)10.1111/jan.15792 (DOI)001034667700001 ()37485735 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85165453712 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-14 Created: 2023-08-14 Last updated: 2024-01-18Bibliographically approved
Tibell, L. H., Årestedt, K., Holm, M., Wallin, V., Steineck, G., Hudson, P., . . . Alvariza, A. (2024). Preparedness for caregiving and preparedness for death: Associations and modifiable thereafter factors among family caregivers of patients with advanced cancer in specialized home care. Death Studies, 48(4), 407-416
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preparedness for caregiving and preparedness for death: Associations and modifiable thereafter factors among family caregivers of patients with advanced cancer in specialized home care
Show others...
2024 (English)In: Death Studies, ISSN 0748-1187, E-ISSN 1091-7683, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 407-416Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study was to (1) explore associations between preparedness for caregiving and preparedness for death among family caregivers of patients with advanced cancer and (2) explore modifiable preparedness factors, such as communication and support. Data was derived from a baseline questionnaire collected in specialized home care. The questionnaire included socio-demographics, the Preparedness for Caregiving Scale, and single items addressing preparedness for death, received support and communication about incurable illness. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and Spearman correlations. Altogether 39 family caregivers participated. A significant association was found between preparedness for caregiving and preparedness for death. Received support and communication about the illness was associated with higher levels of preparedness for caregiving and death. This study contributes to evidence on the association between preparedness for caregiving and death, but also that communication and support employed by healthcare professionals could improve family caregiver preparedness and wellbeing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2024
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-123596 (URN)10.1080/07481187.2023.2231388 (DOI)001024602000001 ()37441803 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85165191936 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-10 Created: 2023-08-10 Last updated: 2024-02-27Bibliographically approved
Svensson, A., Nilsson, B., Lantz, E., Bremer, A., Årestedt, K. & Israelsson, J. (2024). Response times in rural areas for emergency medical services, fire and rescue services and voluntary first responders during out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. Resuscitation Plus, 17, Article ID 100548.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Response times in rural areas for emergency medical services, fire and rescue services and voluntary first responders during out-of-hospital cardiac arrests
Show others...
2024 (English)In: Resuscitation Plus, E-ISSN 2666-5204, Vol. 17, article id 100548Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To increase survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA), great efforts are made to improve the number of voluntary first responders (VFR). However, evidence of the potential utility of such efforts is sparse, especially in rural areas. Therefore, the aim was to describe and compare response times for emergency medical services (EMS), fire and rescue services (FRS), and VFR during OHCA in relation to population density.

Methods: This observational and comparative study was based on data including positions and time stamps for VFR and response times for EMS and FRS in a region in southern Sweden.ResultsIn total, 285 OHCAs between 1 July 2020 and 31 December 2021 were analysed. VFR had the shortest median response time in comparison to EMS and FRS in all studied population densities. The overall median (Q1–Q3) time gain for VFR was 03:07 (01:39–05:41) minutes. A small proportion (19.2%) of alerted VFR accepted the assignments. This is most problematic in rural and sub-rural areas, where there were low numbers of alerted VFR. Also, FRS had shorter response time than EMS in all studied population densities except in urban areas.

Conclusion: The differences found in median response times between rural and urban areas are worrisome from an equality perspective. More focus should be placed on recruiting VFR, especially in rural areas since VFR can potentially contribute to saving more lives. Also, since FRS has a shorter response time than EMS in rural, sub-rural, and sub-urban areas, FRS should be dispatched more frequently.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-126711 (URN)10.1016/j.resplu.2023.100548 (DOI)2-s2.0-85182349591 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-01-15 Created: 2024-01-15 Last updated: 2024-01-22Bibliographically approved
Ayoub, M., Udo, C., Årestedt, K., Kreicbergs, U. & Lövgren, M. (2024). The Family Talk Intervention in Pediatric Oncology: Potential Effects Reported by Parents. Children, 11(1), Article ID 95.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Family Talk Intervention in Pediatric Oncology: Potential Effects Reported by Parents
Show others...
2024 (English)In: Children, E-ISSN 2227-9067, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 95Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Childhood cancer impacts the family system and has psychosocial consequences for all family members. For the parents, the ill child, and the siblings to be able to adjust to this challenging situation, the whole family needs access to psychosocial support. However, only a few such family interventions in pediatric oncology have been evaluated. The aim of this study was to explore the potential effects of a family-centered intervention, the Family Talk Intervention (FTI), in pediatric oncology from the parents' perspectives. Methods: A concurrent mixed methods design was used for this study. Data were derived from a pilot study of 26 families recruited from one pediatric oncology center in Sweden. This study focused on questionnaire and interview data from 52 parents. Results: After participation in FTI, the parents felt more satisfied with the conversations within the family about the illness. FTI also contributed to strengthened family togetherness, including more open communication and improved family relations, as described by the parents. Parents further expressed that they felt more empowered in their parenting role following FTI. Conclusions: The findings regarding FTI's ability to improve family communication and family relations, thus strengthening family togetherness in families with childhood cancer, are promising. This provides motivation for a large-scale study of FTIs in pediatric oncology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2024
Keywords
Family Talk Intervention, pediatric oncology, psychosocial support, family, parents
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-127685 (URN)10.3390/children11010095 (DOI)001149200800001 ()38255408 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85183422756 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-02-14 Created: 2024-02-14 Last updated: 2024-02-14
Israelsson, J., Koistinen, L., Årestedt, K., Rooth, M. & Bremer, A. (2023). Associations between comorbidity and health-related quality of life among in-hospital cardiac arrest survivors – A cross-sectional nationwide registry study. Resuscitation, 188, Article ID 109822.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between comorbidity and health-related quality of life among in-hospital cardiac arrest survivors – A cross-sectional nationwide registry study
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 188, article id 109822Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of this study was to explore associations between comorbidities and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) survivors.

Methods: This registry study is based on data from the Swedish Registry of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (SRCR) collected during 2014–2017. HRQoL was assessed using the EQ-5D-5L, the EQ Visual Analogue Scale (EQ VAS) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). In total, 1,278 IHCA survivors were included in the study, 3–6 months after the cardiac arrest (CA). Data were analysed with descriptive and inferential statistics. The comorbidities analysed in this study were the patients’ status for diabetes, previous myocardial infarction, previous stroke, respiratory insufficiency, and heart failure.

Results: Overall, the IHCA survivors reported high levels of HRQoL, but there was great variation within the population, e.g., EQ VAS median (q1- q3) = 70 (50–80). Survivors with one or more comorbidities reported worse HRQoL in 6 out of 8 outcomes (p < 0.001). All studied comorbidities were each associated with worse HRQoL, but no comorbidity was associated with every outcome measure. Previous stroke and respiratory insufficiency were significantly associated with every outcome measure except for HADS Anxiety. The linear regression models explained 4–8% of the total vari- ance in HRQoL (p < 0.001).

Conclusion: Since IHCA survivors with comorbidities report worse HRQoL compared to those without comorbidities, it is important to pay directed attention to them when developing and providing post-CA care, especially in those with respiratory insufficiency and previous stroke.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Cardiac arrest, Comorbidity, Health, Quality of life
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-120807 (URN)10.1016/j.resuscitation.2023.109822 (DOI)001002238600001 ()37150395 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85159601483 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-05-19 Created: 2023-05-19 Last updated: 2024-01-11Bibliographically approved
Säfström, E., Årestedt, K., Liljeroos, M., Nordgren, L., Jaarsma, T. & Strömberg, A. (2023). Associations between continuity of care, perceived control and self-care and their impact on health-related quality of life and hospital readmission - A structural equation model. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 79(6), 2305-2315
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between continuity of care, perceived control and self-care and their impact on health-related quality of life and hospital readmission - A structural equation model
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 79, no 6, p. 2305-2315Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AimThe aim of this study is to examine whether a conceptual model including the associations between continuity of care, perceived control and self-care could explain variations in health-related quality of life and hospital readmissions in people with chronic cardiac conditions after hospital discharge. DesignCorrelational design based on cross-sectional data from a multicentre survey study. MethodsPeople hospitalized due to angina, atrial fibrillation, heart failure or myocardial infarction were included at four hospitals using consecutive sampling procedures during 2017-2019. Eligible people received questionnaires by regular mail 4-6 weeks after discharge. A tentative conceptual model describing the relationship between continuity of care, self-care, perceived control, health-related quality of life and readmission was developed and evaluated using structural equation modelling. ResultsIn total, 542 people (mean age 75 years, 37% females) were included in the analyses. According to the structural equation model, continuity of care predicted self-care, which in turn predicted health-related quality of life and hospital readmission. The association between continuity of care and self-care was partly mediated by perceived control. The model had an excellent model fit: RMSEA = 0.06, 90% CI, 0.05-0.06; CFI = 0.90; TLI = 0.90. ConclusionInterventions aiming to improve health-related quality of life and reduce hospital readmission rates should focus on enhancing continuity of care, perceived control and self-care. ImpactThis study reduces the knowledge gap on how central factors after hospitalization, such as continuity of care, self-care and perceived control, are associated with improved health-related quality of life and hospital readmission in people with cardiac conditions. The results suggest that these factors together predicted the quality of life and readmissions in this sample. This knowledge is relevant to researchers when designing interventions or predicting health-related quality of life and hospital readmission. For clinicians, it emphasizes that enhancing continuity of care, perceived control and self-care positively impacts clinical outcomes. Patient or Public ContributionPeople and healthcare personnel evaluated content validity and were included in selecting items for the short version.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
adult nursing chronic illness, conceptual models of nursing, discharge planning, older people, quality of life, self-care
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-119966 (URN)10.1111/jan.15581 (DOI)000928387700001 ()36744677 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85147508370 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-27 Created: 2023-03-27 Last updated: 2023-09-07Bibliographically approved
Projects
The Family Talk Intervention in clinical practice when a parent with dependent children or a child is severely ill: An effectiveness-implementation study [2021-00999_VR]; Marie Cederschiöld University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0961-5250

Search in DiVA

Show all publications