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Sepúlveda-Rebolledo, P., Gonzalez-Rosales, C., Dopson, M., Pérez-Rueda, E., Holmes, D. S. & Valdés, J. H. (2024). Comparative genomics sheds light on transcription factor-mediated regulation in the extreme acidophilic Acidithiobacillia representatives. Research in Microbiology, 175(1-2), Article ID 104135.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparative genomics sheds light on transcription factor-mediated regulation in the extreme acidophilic Acidithiobacillia representatives
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2024 (English)In: Research in Microbiology, ISSN 0923-2508, E-ISSN 1769-7123, Vol. 175, no 1-2, article id 104135Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Extreme acidophiles thrive in acidic environments, confront a multitude of challenges, and demonstrate remarkable adaptability in their metabolism to cope with the ever-changing environmental fluctuations, which encompass variations in temperature, pH levels, and the availability of electron acceptors and donors. The survival and proliferation of members within the Acidithiobacillia class rely on the deployment of transcriptional regulatory systems linked to essential physiological traits. The study of these transcriptional regulatory systems provides valuable insights into critical processes, such as energy metabolism and nutrient assimilation, and how they integrate into major genetic-metabolic circuits. In this study, we examined the transcriptional regulatory repertoires and potential interactions of forty-three Acidithiobacillia complete and draft genomes, encompassing nine species. To investigate the function and diversity of Transcription Factors (TFs) and their DNA Binding Sites (DBSs), we conducted a genome-wide comparative analysis, which allowed us to identify these regulatory elements in representatives of Acidithiobacillia. We classified TFs into gene families and compared their occurrence among all representatives, revealing conservation patterns across the class. The results identified conserved regulators for several pathways, including iron and sulfur oxidation, the main pathways for energy acquisition, providing new evidence for viable regulatory interactions and branch-specific conservation in Acidithiobacillia. The identification of TFs and DBSs not only corroborates existing experimental information for selected species, but also introduces novel candidates for experimental validation. Moreover, these promising candidates have the potential for further extension to new representatives within the class.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-126362 (URN)10.1016/j.resmic.2023.104135 (DOI)001162386800001 ()2-s2.0-85173175249 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-01-11 Created: 2024-01-11 Last updated: 2024-02-27Bibliographically approved
Yu, C., Turner, S., Huotari, S., Chen, N., Shchukarev, A., Österholm, P., . . . Åström, M. E. (2024). Manganese cycling and transport in boreal estuaries impacted by acidic Mn-rich drainage. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 365, 136-157
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Manganese cycling and transport in boreal estuaries impacted by acidic Mn-rich drainage
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2024 (English)In: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, ISSN 0016-7037, E-ISSN 1872-9533, Vol. 365, p. 136-157Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As critical transition zones between the land and the sea, estuaries are not only hotspots of hydrogeochemical and microbial processes/reactions, but also play a vital role in processing and transferring terrestrial fluxes of metals and nutrients to the sea. This study focused on three estuaries in the Gulf of Bothnia. All of them experience frequent inputs of acidic and Mn/metal-rich creek waters due to flushing of acid sulfate soils that are widespread in the creekś catchments. Analyzing existing long-term water chemistry data revealed a strong seasonal variation of Mn loads, with the highest values in spring (after snow melt) and autumn (after heavy rains). We sampled surface waters, suspended particulate matter (SPM), and sediments from the estuarine mixing zones and determined the loads and solid-phase speciation of Mn as well as the composition and metabolic potentials of microbial communities. The results showed that the removal, cycling, and lateral transport of Mn were governed by similar phases and processes in the three estuaries. Manganese X-ray absorption spectroscopy data of the SPM suggested that the removal of Mn was regulated by silicates (e.g., biotite), organically complexed Mn(II), and MnOx (dominated by groutite and phyllomanganates). While the fractional amounts of silicate-bound Mn(II) were overall low and constant throughout the estuaries, MnOx was strongly correlated with the Mn loadings of the SPM and thus the main vector for the removal of Mn in the central and outer parts of the estuaries, along with organically complexed Mn(II). Down estuary, both the fractional amounts and average Mn oxidation state of the MnOx phases increased with (i) the total Mn loads on the SPM samples and (ii) the relative abundances of several potential Mn-oxidizing bacteria (Flavobacterium, Caulobacter, Mycobacterium, and Pedobacter) in the surface waters. These features collectively suggested that the oxidation of Mn, probably mediated by the potential Mn-oxidizing microorganisms, became more extensive and complete towards the central and outer parts of the estuaries. At two sites in the central parts of one estuary, abundant phyllomanganates occurred in the surface sediments, but were converted to surface-sorbed Mn(II) phases at deeper layers (>3–4 cm). The occurrence of phyllomanganates may have suppressed the reduction of sulfate in the surface sediments, pushing down the methane sulfate transition zone that is typically shallow in estuarine sediments. At the outermost site in the estuary, deposited MnOx were reduced immediately at the water–sediment interface and converted most likely to Mn carbonate. The mobile Mn species produced by the Mn reduction processes (e.g., aqueous Mn(II) and ligand complexed Mn(III)) could partly diffuse into the overlying waters and, together with the estuarine Mn loads carried by the surface waters, transfer large amounts of reactive Mn into open coastal areas and subsequently contribute to Mn shuttling and inter-linked biogeochemical processes over the seafloor. Given the widespread occurrence of acid sulfate soils and other sulfidic geological materials on many coastal plains worldwide, the identified Mn attenuation and transport mechanisms are relevant for many estuaries globally.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Manganese attenuation and recycling; Acid sulfate soil; Estuary; Baltic Sea; X-ray absorption spectroscopy; Anaerobic oxidation of methane
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-126059 (URN)10.1016/j.gca.2023.12.004 (DOI)001138543400001 ()2-s2.0-85180486003 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Mn geochemistry in boreal estuaries receiving acidic metal rich drainage
Funder
The Geological Survey of Sweden (SGU), 36-2051/2016Academy of Finland, 332249Swedish Research Council, 2020-04853
Available from: 2023-12-19 Created: 2023-12-19 Last updated: 2024-01-19Bibliographically approved
Rios, D., Bellenberg, S., Christel, S., Lindblom, P., Giroux, T. & Dopson, M. (2024). Potential of single and designed mixed cultures to enhance the bioleaching of chalcopyrite by oxidation-reduction potential control. Hydrometallurgy, 224, Article ID 106245.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Potential of single and designed mixed cultures to enhance the bioleaching of chalcopyrite by oxidation-reduction potential control
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2024 (English)In: Hydrometallurgy, ISSN 0304-386X, E-ISSN 1879-1158, Vol. 224, article id 106245Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biomining is the extraction of target metals from ores or wastes such as the dissolution of chalcopyrite for copper recovery. A key outstanding topic of study is to improve the rate and total copper released from chalcopyrite that can become 'passivated' by surface layers, which hinders oxidative attack on the metal sulfide bond. One strategy to increase chalcopyrite bioleaching is to control of the oxidation-reduction potential in the desired range by using 'weak' iron oxidizers. In this study, 15 acidophilic species were evaluated for their ability to catalyze chalcopyrite dissolution that resulted in the addition of Acidithiobacillus ferrianus, Sulfobacillus thermotolerans, and Metallosphaera sedula to the known 'weak' iron oxidizing species. Based upon these data, four microbial consortia were designed including mesophiles (25 degrees and 37 degrees C), moderate thermophiles (49 degrees C), and thermophiles (70 degrees C) that increased copper recoveries by up to 32% compared to abiotic controls. The best performing consortium was the moderate thermophiles Sulfobacillus thermotolerans, Sulfobacillus acidophilus, and Ferroplasma acidiphilum that maintained the oxidation-reduction potential in the desired range. However, the consortia also showed evidence of synergistic interactions between 'weak' iron oxidizers that increased the efficiency of ferrous iron oxidation that resulted in oxidation-reduction potentials above the desired range and lower copper release. Therefore, while designing microbial consortia is a promising strategy to improve the performance of chalcopyrite bio-leaching, care must be taken to ensure synergistic effects do not result in high oxidation-reduction potentials.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Biomining, Copper, Passivation, Weak iron oxidizers, Redox potential
National Category
Geochemistry Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-127374 (URN)10.1016/j.hydromet.2023.106245 (DOI)001138074900001 ()2-s2.0-85179758206 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-02-01 Created: 2024-02-01 Last updated: 2024-02-01
Johnson, A., Nyman, A., Åström, M. E. & Dopson, M. (2024). Regional variation in Swedish acid sulfate soil microbial communities is influenced by temperature and geochemistry. European Journal of Soil Science, 75(1), Article ID e13452.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regional variation in Swedish acid sulfate soil microbial communities is influenced by temperature and geochemistry
2024 (English)In: European Journal of Soil Science, ISSN 1351-0754, E-ISSN 1365-2389, Vol. 75, no 1, article id e13452Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Acid sulfate soils are frequently described as the nastiest soils on Earth, and they pose environmental risks associated with their strong acidity and consequential mobilization of toxic metals present in the soils. Within Sweden, acid sulfate soils have been extensively studied around the northern Baltic coastline and have now been found to occur throughout the area below the maximum Holocene marine limit that stretches for some 2000 km from North to South. This study investigated 20 active acid sulfate soils (field tested pH < 4.0) collected throughout this area that were tested for microbial community composition using 16S rRNA gene amplicons, representing a novel study of microbial communities in ripening zones across a broad regional scale. The microbial community compositions exhibited a north (boreal zone) to south (hemiboreal zone) regional divide, primarily within the oxidized zone (pH < 4.0), to a lesser degree in the transition zone (steep pH gradient), while little differences were observed in the reduced zone (near-neutral pH). For instance, a higher relative abundance of Ktedonobacteraceae was identified in the northern boreal and Gallionellaceae in the southern hemiboreal oxidized zones. In addition, microbial taxa associated with iron and sulphur oxidation and reduction were identified, such as Acidobacteriaceae, Gallionellaceae and Koribacteraceae that have been previously identified in other acid sulfate soils and acid mine drainage settings. The predominant controls of the microbial community differences were the north-south divide indicative of a strong soil-temperature effect followed by soil zones suggesting an influence of the soils' pH and/or redox conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
16S rRNA gene amplicons, acidophile, boreal, iron, pH
National Category
Microbiology Soil Science Geochemistry
Research subject
Ecology, Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-127378 (URN)10.1111/ejss.13452 (DOI)001145568200001 ()2-s2.0-85182625354 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-02-01 Created: 2024-02-01 Last updated: 2024-02-01
Nyman, A., Johnson, A., Yu, C., Sohlenius, G., Becher, M., Dopson, M. & Åström, M. E. (2023). A nationwide acid sulfate soil study: A rapid and cost-efficient approach for characterizing large-scale features. Science of the Total Environment, 869, Article ID 161845.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A nationwide acid sulfate soil study: A rapid and cost-efficient approach for characterizing large-scale features
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2023 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 869, article id 161845Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Acid sulfate soils are sulfide-rich soils that pose a notable environmental risk as their strong acidity and low pH mobilizes metals from soil minerals leading to both acidification and metal contamination of the surrounding environment. In this study a rapid and cost-efficient approach was developed to resolve the main distribution patterns and geochemical features of acid sulfate soils throughout coastal plains stretching for some 2000 km in eastern, southern, and western Sweden. Of the investigated 126 field sites, 47 % had acid sulfate soils including 33 % active, 12 % potential, and 2 % pseudo acid sulfate soils. There were large regional variations in the extent of acid sulfate soils, with overall much higher proportions of these soils along the eastern coastal plains facing the Baltic Sea than the western coastal plains facing the Kattegatt/Skagerrak (Atlantic Ocean). The sulfur concentrations of the soil's parent material, consisting of reduced near-pH neutral sediments, were correlated inversely both with the minimum pH of the soils in situ (rS = −0.65) and the pH after incubation (oxidation) of the reduced sediments (rS = −0.77). This indicated the importance of sulfide levels in terms of both present and potential future acidification. Hence, the higher proportion of acid sulfate soils in the east was largely the result of higher sulfur concentrations in this part of the country. The study showed that the approach was successful in identifying large-scale spatial patterns and geochemical characteristics of importance for environmental assessments related to these environmentally unfriendly soils.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
National Category
Soil Science
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-119131 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2023.161845 (DOI)000925436800001 ()36709904 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85147197802 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Environmental Protection Agency
Available from: 2023-02-07 Created: 2023-02-07 Last updated: 2023-05-17Bibliographically approved
Dopson, M. & Okibe, N. (2023). Biomining Microorganisms: Diversity and Modus Operandi. In: David Barrie Johnson, Christopher George Bryan, Michael Schlömann, Francisco Figueroa Roberto (Ed.), Biomining Technologies: Extracting and Recovering Metals from Ores and Wastes (pp. 89-110). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biomining Microorganisms: Diversity and Modus Operandi
2023 (English)In: Biomining Technologies: Extracting and Recovering Metals from Ores and Wastes / [ed] David Barrie Johnson, Christopher George Bryan, Michael Schlömann, Francisco Figueroa Roberto, Springer, 2023, p. 89-110Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Consortia of biomining microorganisms catalyze metal sulfide dissolution for extraction and recovery of metals such as gold and copper by regenerating the ferric iron oxidant along with metabolizing the resultant elemental and reduced inorganic sulfur compounds. These microorganisms are from the Bacteria and Archaea domains with the Bacteria having generally lower growth temperatures while the Archaea comprise mostly moderate and extreme thermophilic species. All microorganisms used in current biomining operations are able to grow at acidic pH values along with metal tolerance systems that allow them to survive the multiple extreme conditions in leaching liquors. The bacterial and archaeal ferrous iron oxidation systems differ while their reduced inorganic sulfur compound metabolisms contain enzyme pathways that are similar but not identical between the two domains. In addition, dissolution of non-sulfidic ores such as oxyhydroxide minerals, and electronic wastes, can also be mediated via biogenic acidolysis and complexation or by microbial Fe-reducing activity. Recent advances in “omics” technologies have aided in identifying new acidophilic biomining species and future studies will continue to elucidate their modus operandi to aid in increasing rates of mineral dissolution.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-125726 (URN)10.1007/978-3-031-05382-5_5 (DOI)2-s2.0-85160409436 (Scopus ID)9783031053825 (ISBN)9783031053818 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-11-20 Created: 2023-11-20 Last updated: 2023-11-20Bibliographically approved
Seidel, L., Broman, E., Nilsson, E., Ståhle, M., Ketzer, J. M., Pérez Martínez, C., . . . Dopson, M. (2023). Climate change-related warming reduces thermal sensitivity and modifies metabolic activity of coastal benthic bacterial communities. The ISME Journal, 17, 855-869
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate change-related warming reduces thermal sensitivity and modifies metabolic activity of coastal benthic bacterial communities
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2023 (English)In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 17, p. 855-869Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Besides long-term average temperature increases, climate change is projected to result in a higher frequency of marine heatwaves. Coastal zones are some of the most productive and vulnerable ecosystems, with many stretches already under anthropogenic pressure. Microorganisms in coastal areas are central to marine energy and nutrient cycling and therefore, it is important to understand how climate change will alter these ecosystems. Using a long-term heated bay (warmed for 50 years) in comparison with an unaffected adjacent control bay and an experimental short-term thermal (9 days at 6–35 °C) incubation experiment, this study provides new insights into how coastal benthic water and surface sediment bacterial communities respond to temperature change. Benthic bacterial communities in the two bays reacted differently to temperature increases with productivity in the heated bay having a broader thermal tolerance compared with that in the control bay. Furthermore, the transcriptional analysis showed that the heated bay benthic bacteria had higher transcript numbers related to energy metabolism and stress compared to the control bay, while short-term elevated temperatures in the control bay incubation experiment induced a transcript response resembling that observed in the heated bay field conditions. In contrast, a reciprocal response was not observed for the heated bay community RNA transcripts exposed to lower temperatures indicating a potential tipping point in community response may have been reached. In summary, long-term warming modulates the performance, productivity, and resilience of bacterial communities in response to warming.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
Keywords
Climate change, bacterial production, RNA-Seq., 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, thermal performance, benthic zone
National Category
Bioinformatics and Systems Biology Microbiology Climate Research Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-111587 (URN)10.1038/s41396-023-01395-z (DOI)000959217900001 ()36977742 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85151163130 (Scopus ID)
Note

Is included in the dissertation as a manuscript titled: Climate change related warming reduces thermal sensitivity of performance and metabolic plasticity of benthic zone bacterial communities

Available from: 2022-04-25 Created: 2022-04-25 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Westmeijer, G., Escudero, C., Bergin, C., Turner, S., Ståhle, M., Mehrshad, M., . . . Dopson, M. (2023). Continental scientific drilling and microbiology: (extremely) low biomass in crystalline bedrock of central Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Continental scientific drilling and microbiology: (extremely) low biomass in crystalline bedrock of central Sweden
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2023 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Scientific drilling expeditions offer a unique opportunity to characterize the microbial communities in the subsurface that have been long-term isolated from the surface. With subsurface microbial biomass being low in general, biological contamination from the drilling fluid, sample processing, or molecular work is a major concern. To address this, characterization of the contaminant populations in the drilling fluid and negative extraction controls are essential for assessing and evaluating such sequencing data. Here, crystalline rock cores down to 2250 m depth, groundwater-bearing fractures, and the drilling fluid were sampled for DNA to characterize the microbial communities using a broad genomic approach. However, even after removing potential contaminant populations present in the drilling fluid, notorious contaminants were abundant and mainly affiliated with the bacterial order Burkholderiales. These contaminant microorganisms likely originated from the reagents used for isolating and amplifying DNA despite stringent quality standards during the molecular work. The detection of strictly anaerobic sulfate reducers such as Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator suggested the presence of autochthonous deep biosphere taxa in the sequenced libraries, yet these clades represented only a minor fraction of the sequence counts (< 0.1 %), hindering further ecological interpretations. The described methods and findings emphasize the importance of sequencing extraction controls and can support experimental design for future microbiological studies in conjunction with continental drilling operations.

National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-126781 (URN)10.5194/bg-2023-147 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 201903688Swedish Research Council, 2017-00642
Note

Biogeosciences Discuss

Available from: 2024-01-16 Created: 2024-01-16 Last updated: 2024-02-28Bibliographically approved
Dopson, M., Gonzalez-Rosales, C., Holmes, D. S. S. & Mykytczuk, N. (2023). Eurypsychrophilic acidophiles: From (meta)genomes to low-temperature biotechnologies. Frontiers in Microbiology, 14, Article ID 1149903.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eurypsychrophilic acidophiles: From (meta)genomes to low-temperature biotechnologies
2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Microbiology, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 14, article id 1149903Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Low temperature and acidic environments encompass natural milieus such as acid rock drainage in Antarctica and anthropogenic sites including drained sulfidic sediments in Scandinavia. The microorganisms inhabiting these environments include polyextremophiles that are both extreme acidophiles (defined as having an optimum growth pH < 3), and eurypsychrophiles that grow at low temperatures down to approximately 4 degrees C but have an optimum temperature for growth above 15 degrees C. Eurypsychrophilic acidophiles have important roles in natural biogeochemical cycling on earth and potentially on other planetary bodies and moons along with biotechnological applications in, for instance, low-temperature metal dissolution from metal sulfides. Five low-temperature acidophiles are characterized, namely, Acidithiobacillus ferriphilus, Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, "Ferrovum myxofaciens," and Alicyclobacillus disulfidooxidans, and their characteristics are reviewed. Our understanding of characterized and environmental eurypsychrophilic acidophiles has been accelerated by the application of "omics" techniques that have aided in revealing adaptations to low pH and temperature that can be synergistic, while other adaptations are potentially antagonistic. The lack of known acidophiles that exclusively grow below 15 degrees C may be due to the antagonistic nature of adaptations in this polyextremophile. In conclusion, this review summarizes the knowledge of eurypsychrophilic acidophiles and places the information in evolutionary, environmental, biotechnological, and exobiology perspectives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
Keywords
acidic (microbial) environments, astrobiology, bio-applications, polyextremophile, snowball earth, stenopsychrophile
National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-120762 (URN)10.3389/fmicb.2023.1149903 (DOI)000957934100001 ()37007468 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85151262011 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-05-17 Created: 2023-05-17 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Seidel, L., Sachpazidou, V., Ketzer, J. M., Hylander, S., Forsman, A. & Dopson, M. (2023). Long-term warming modulates diversity, vertical structuring of microbial communities, and sulfate reduction in coastal Baltic Sea sediments. Frontiers in Microbiology, 14, Article ID 1099445.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term warming modulates diversity, vertical structuring of microbial communities, and sulfate reduction in coastal Baltic Sea sediments
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2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Microbiology, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 14, article id 1099445Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Coastal waters such as those found in the Baltic Sea already suffer from anthropogenic related problems including increased algal blooming and hypoxia while ongoing and future climate change will likely worsen these effects. Microbial communities in sediments play a crucial role in the marine energy- and nutrient cycling, and how they are affected by climate change and shape the environment in the future is of great interest. The aims of this study were to investigate potential effects of prolonged warming on microbial community composition and nutrient cycling including sulfate reduction in surface (similar to 0.5 cm) to deeper sediments (similar to 24 cm). To investigate this, 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing was performed, and sulfate concentrations were measured and compared between sediments in a heated bay (which has been used as a cooling water outlet from a nearby nuclear power plant for approximately 50 years) and a nearby but unaffected control bay. The results showed variation in overall microbial diversity according to sediment depth and higher sulfate flux in the heated bay compared to the control bay. A difference in vertical community structure reflected increased relative abundances of sulfur oxidizing- and sulfate reducing bacteria along with a higher proportion of archaea, such as Bathyarchaeota, in the heated compared to the control bay. This was particularly evident closer to the sediment surface, indicating a compression of geochemical zones in the heated bay. These results corroborate findings in previous studies and additionally point to an amplified effect of prolonged warming deeper in the sediment, which could result in elevated concentrations of toxic compounds and greenhouse gases closer to the sediment surface.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-120053 (URN)10.3389/fmicb.2023.1099445 (DOI)000967877400001 ()37065140 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85152780217 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, FR-2020/0008The Crafoord Foundation, 20170539Magnus Bergvall Foundation, 2019-03116
Available from: 2023-04-03 Created: 2023-04-03 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Projects
Syntrofi och symbios för överlevnad och tillväxt i den djupa terrestra biosfären [202100-6271]; Linnaeus University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9622-3318

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