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Publications (10 of 24) Show all publications
Shaw, P. (2018). Are we making our students plagiarize?. In: Diane Pecorari, Philip Shaw (Ed.), Student plagiarism in higher education: reflections on teaching practice (pp. 123-139). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are we making our students plagiarize?
2018 (English)In: Student plagiarism in higher education: reflections on teaching practice / [ed] Diane Pecorari, Philip Shaw, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 123-139Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2018
Series
Research into higher education
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities, English
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78432 (URN)9781138055155 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-10-22 Created: 2018-10-22 Last updated: 2019-02-04Bibliographically approved
Coleman, J., Hultgren, K., Li, W., Tsui, C.-F. C. & Shaw, P. (2018). Forum on English-medium Instruction. TESOL quarterly (Print), 52(3), 701-720
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Forum on English-medium Instruction
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2018 (English)In: TESOL quarterly (Print), ISSN 0039-8322, E-ISSN 1545-7249, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 701-720Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

During the first half of 2017, four scholars who know English-medium instruction (EMI) well and view it from different perspectives took part in a round-robin exchange. The forum contributors answered six sets of questions on aspects of EMI: defining terms; learning English in an EMI environment; the political or policy framework; learning a subject in a second language; teachers working in a second language; and EMI and multilingual education. Below is a summary of their answers (a longer version can be found in the online version of this Forum as supplementary content). The questions were devised and the responses edited by Philip Shaw.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Humanities, English Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78422 (URN)10.1002/tesq.469 (DOI)000445275700011 ()2-s2.0-85053631459 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-10-22 Created: 2018-10-22 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Shaw, P. & Mcmillion, A. (2018). Reading Comprehension in Advanced L2 Readers. In: Kenneth Hyltenstam, Inge Bartning, Lars Fant (Ed.), High-Level Language Proficiency in Second Language and Multilingual Contexts: (pp. 146-169). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reading Comprehension in Advanced L2 Readers
2018 (English)In: High-Level Language Proficiency in Second Language and Multilingual Contexts: / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Inge Bartning, Lars Fant, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018, p. 146-169Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities, English
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78431 (URN)10.1017/9781316809686.007 (DOI)9781107175921 (ISBN)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2018-10-22 Created: 2018-10-22 Last updated: 2019-01-23Bibliographically approved
Pecorari, D. & Shaw, P. (2018). So what should we do?. In: Diane Pecorari, Philip Shaw (Ed.), Student Plagiarism in Higher Education: Reflections on Teaching Practice (pp. 157-168). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>So what should we do?
2018 (English)In: Student Plagiarism in Higher Education: Reflections on Teaching Practice / [ed] Diane Pecorari, Philip Shaw, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 157-168Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2018
Series
Research into Higher Education
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities, English Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78436 (URN)9781138055162 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-10-22 Created: 2018-10-22 Last updated: 2019-02-04Bibliographically approved
Pecorari, D. & Shaw, P. (Eds.). (2018). Student Plagiarism in Higher Education: Reflections on Teaching Practice. London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Student Plagiarism in Higher Education: Reflections on Teaching Practice
2018 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2018. p. 180
Series
Research into Higher Education
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities, English
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78429 (URN)9781138055162 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-10-22 Created: 2018-10-22 Last updated: 2019-02-04Bibliographically approved
Shaw, P. (2018). Teacher Preparation for Postsecondary Writing. In: The TESOL Encyclopedia of English Language Teaching: . New York: Wiley-Blackwell
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teacher Preparation for Postsecondary Writing
2018 (English)In: The TESOL Encyclopedia of English Language Teaching, New York: Wiley-Blackwell, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Teachers of postsecondary writing need internalized knowledge in the areas of the language being taught, writing processes, genre structure and register, the social and political issues associated with writing and academic language generally, and of a range of tasks and teaching strategies. This is best achieved by a loop‐input strategy in which the teacher preparation makes use of the types of task that teachers will have to use themselves for the explicit content they must learn. This allows them to experience the effectiveness or otherwise of the tasks and to reflect on their own reactions to them.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
Keywords
loop‐input, postsecondary education, teacher preparation, teaching methods in applied linguistics, language for academic purposes, writing
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities, English
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78434 (URN)10.1002/9781118784235.eelt0557 (DOI)9781118784228 (ISBN)9781118784235 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-10-22 Created: 2018-10-22 Last updated: 2019-05-22Bibliographically approved
Shaw, P. & Pecorari, D. (2018). Why so many questions about plagiarism?. In: Diane Pecorari, Philip Shaw (Ed.), Student Palgiarism in Higher Education: Reflections on Teaching Practice (pp. 1-11). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why so many questions about plagiarism?
2018 (English)In: Student Palgiarism in Higher Education: Reflections on Teaching Practice / [ed] Diane Pecorari, Philip Shaw, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 1-11Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2018
Series
Research into Higher Education
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities, English
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78433 (URN)9781138055162 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-10-22 Created: 2018-10-22 Last updated: 2019-02-04Bibliographically approved
Malmström, H., Pecorari, D. & Shaw, P. (2018). Words for what?: Contrasting university students' receptive and productive academic vocabulary needs. English for specific purposes (New York, N.Y.), 50, 28-39
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Words for what?: Contrasting university students' receptive and productive academic vocabulary needs
2018 (English)In: English for specific purposes (New York, N.Y.), ISSN 0889-4906, E-ISSN 1873-1937, Vol. 50, p. 28-39Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

With the objective of determining what academic vocabulary students use productively, and exploring the relationship between receptive and productive academic vocabulary, this paper continues the dialog on what constitutes academic vocabulary. By adopting a set of principled criteria (ratio, dispersion, discipline specificity and range) and by approximating the procedures from a recent study of academic vocabulary, the academic vocabulary found in students' writing is identified and subsequently compared to the academic vocabulary found in published academic writing (indexical of receptive purposes). Nearly 600 words emerge as being represented significantly more frequently in students' academic writing than in their non-academic writing, demonstrating that students distinguish in their writing between academic and non-academic vocabulary. Furthermore, the investigation finds significant differences between students' productive academic vocabulary and academic vocabulary serving receptive purposes, suggesting that students' productive and receptive academic vocabulary needs are far from identical. The findings reported here are intended to serve as a tool for EAP educators working to help students develop academic vocabulary fit for purpose, as well as an incentive for EAP researchers to continue to explore the nature of academic vocabulary. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Academic vocabulary, Receptive, Productive, Vocabulary list, Academic writing
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Humanities, English
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-76778 (URN)10.1016/j.esp.2017.11.002 (DOI)000430758800003 ()2-s2.0-85038250758 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-07-11 Created: 2018-07-11 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Malmström, H., Mežek, Š., Pecorari, D., Shaw, P. & Irvine, A. (2017). Engaging with terminology in the multilingual classroom: Teachers' practices for bridging the gap between L1 lectures and English reading. Classroom Discourse, 8(1), 3-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Engaging with terminology in the multilingual classroom: Teachers' practices for bridging the gap between L1 lectures and English reading
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2017 (English)In: Classroom Discourse, ISSN 1946-3014, E-ISSN 1946-3022, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 3-18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In some academic settings where English is not the first language it is nonetheless common for reading to be assigned in English, and the expectation is often that students will acquire subject terminology incidentally in the first language as well as in English as a result of listening and reading. It is then a prerequisite that students notice and engage with terminology in both languages. To this end, teachers’ classroom practices for making students attend to and engage with terms are crucial for furthering students’ vocabulary competence in two languages. Using transcribed video recordings of eight undergraduate lectures from two universities in such a setting, this paper provides a comprehensive picture of what teachers ‘do’ with terminology during a lecture, i.e. how terms are allowed to feature in the classroom discourse. It is established, for example, that teachers nearly always employ some sort of emphatic practice when using a term in a lecture. However, the repertoire of such practices is limited. Further, teachers rarely adapt their repertoires to cater to the special needs arguably required in these settings, or to exploit the affordances of multilingual environments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2017
Keywords
Disciplinary discourse, vocabulary, exposure, teacher practices, partial English-medium instruction, multilingual classrooms
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-59965 (URN)10.1080/19463014.2016.1224723 (DOI)000396625200002 ()2-s2.0-84984689220 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2008-5584
Available from: 2017-01-19 Created: 2017-01-19 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Malmström, H., Mežek, Š., Pecorari, D., Shaw, P. & Irvine, A. (2016). Engaging with terminology in the parallel-language classroom: Teachers' practices for bridging the gap between L1 and English. In: ASLA-symposiet 2016: . Paper presented at ASLA-symposiet 2016, Uppsala University.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Engaging with terminology in the parallel-language classroom: Teachers' practices for bridging the gap between L1 and English
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2016 (English)In: ASLA-symposiet 2016, 2016Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In settings in which English is used as a medium of instruction (EMI) in parallel with another language, a common expectation is that students will acquire subject terminology incidentally in the L1 as well as in English as a result of listening and reading. It is then a prerequisite that students notice and engage with terminology in both languages. To this end, teachers’ classroom practices for making students attend to and engage with terms are crucial for furthering students’ vocabulary competence in two languages. Using transcribed video recordings of a sample of lectures from two courses in a partial EMI setting, in which the lectures were in Swedish and the textbooks were in English, this paper will present a comprehensive picture of what teachers ‘do’ with terminology during a lecture, i.e., how terms are allowed to feature in the classroom discourse. It is established, for example, that teachers nearly always employ some sort of emphatic practice when using a term in a lecture. However, the repertoire of such practices is limited. Further, teachers rarely adapt their repertoires to cater to the special needs arguably required in partial EMI settings, or to exploit the affordances of these learning environments.

National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-59969 (URN)
Conference
ASLA-symposiet 2016, Uppsala University
Available from: 2017-01-19 Created: 2017-01-19 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8301-3960

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