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Stedt, Johan
Publications (10 of 12) Show all publications
Sandegren, L., Stedt, J., Lustig, U., Bonnedahl, J., Andersson, D. I. & Jaerhult, J. D. (2018). Long-term carriage and rapid transmission of extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing E-coli within a flock of Mallards in the absence of antibiotic selection. Environmental Microbiology Reports, 10(5), 576-582
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term carriage and rapid transmission of extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing E-coli within a flock of Mallards in the absence of antibiotic selection
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2018 (English)In: Environmental Microbiology Reports, ISSN 1758-2229, E-ISSN 1758-2229, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 576-582Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Wild birds have been suggested as transmitters and reservoirs for antibiotic resistant bacteria. We performed an experimental study investigating carriage time and interindividual transmission of extended spectrum beta-lactamase- (ESBL-)producing Escherichia coli in Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) to assess if the birds carry the bacteria long enough to transfer them geographically during migration. Mallards were inoculated intraoesophageally with four different strains of ESBL-producing E. coli and kept together in a flock. The ESBL-strains belonged to sequence types previously shown to spread between birds and humans. Culturing from faecal samples showed presence of ESBL-producing E. coli the entire 29 day experimental period. An extensive and rapid transmission of the different ESBL-strains between individuals (including non-inoculated controls) was observed. In necropsy samples, we detected ESBL-strains in the cecum even in faeces-negative birds, indicating that this part of the intestine could function as a reservoir of resistant bacteria. We demonstrate that birds can carry ESBL-producing E. coli for long enough times to travel far during migration and the extensive interindividual transmission suggests spread between individuals in a dense bird population as a mechanism that allow persistence of resistant bacteria.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
National Category
Ecology Infectious Medicine
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78616 (URN)10.1111/1758-2229.12681 (DOI)000446986500008 ()30043488 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85053510845 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-01 Created: 2018-11-01 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Stedt, J., Bonnedahl, J., Hernandez, J., Waldenström, J., McMahon, B. J., Tolf, C., . . . Drobni, M. (2015). Carriage of CTX-M type extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) in gulls across Europe. Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica, 57, Article ID 74.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carriage of CTX-M type extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) in gulls across Europe
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2015 (English)In: Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica, ISSN 0044-605X, Vol. 57, article id 74Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs), a group of enzymes conferring resistance to third generation cephalosporins have rapidly increased in Enterobacteriacae and pose a major challenge to human health care. Resistant isolates are common in domestic animals and clinical settings, but prevalence and genotype distribution varies on a geographical scale. Although ESBL genes are frequently detected in bacteria isolated from wildlife samples, ESBL dissemination of resistant bacteria to the environment is largely unknown. To address this, we used three closely related gull species as a model system and collected more than 3000 faecal samples during breeding times in nine European countries. Samples were screened for ESBL-producing bacteria, which were characterized to the level of ESBL genotype groups (SHV, TEM), or specific genotypes (CTX-M). Results: ESBL-producing bacteria were frequently detected in gulls (906 of 3158 samples, 28.7 %), with significant variation in prevalence rates between countries. Highest levels were found in Spain (74.8 %), The Netherlands (37.8 %) and England (27.1 %). Denmark and Poland represented the other extreme with no, or very few positive samples. Genotyping of CTX-M isolates identified 13 different variants, with bla(CTX-M-1) and bla(CTX-M-14) as the most frequently detected. In samples from England, Spain and Portugal, blaCTX-M-14 dominated, while in the rest of the sampled countries blaCTX-M-1 (except Sweden where bla(CTX-M-15) was dominant) was the most frequently detected genotype, a pattern similar to what is known from studies of human materials. Conclusions: CTX-M type ESBLs are common in the faecal microbiota from gulls across Europe. The gull ESBL genotype distribution was in large similar to published datasets from human and food-production animals in Europe. The data suggests that the environmental dissemination of ESBL is high from anthropogenic sources, and widespread occurrence of resistant bacteria in common migratory bird species utilizing urban and agricultural areas suggests that antibiotic resistance genes may also be spread through birds.

Keywords
ESBL, CTX-M, Wildlife, Birds, Gulls, Antibiotic resistance, E. coli, Europe
National Category
Microbiology Veterinary Science
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-47378 (URN)10.1186/s13028-015-0166-3 (DOI)000363921100001 ()26526188 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84945962826 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-11-24 Created: 2015-11-24 Last updated: 2020-01-28Bibliographically approved
Bonnedahl, J., Stedt, J., Waldenström, J., Svensson, L., Drobni, M. & Olsen, B. (2015). Comparison of Extended-Spectrum beta-Lactamase (ESBL) CTX-M Genotypes in Franklin Gulls from Canada and Chile. PLoS ONE, 10(10), Article ID e0141315.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of Extended-Spectrum beta-Lactamase (ESBL) CTX-M Genotypes in Franklin Gulls from Canada and Chile
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2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 10, article id e0141315Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Migratory birds have been suggested to contribute to long-distance dispersal of antimicrobial resistant bacteria, but tests of this hypothesis are lacking. In this study we determined resistance profiles and genotypes of ESBL-producing bacteria in randomly selected Escherichia coli from Franklin's gulls (Leucophaeus pipixcan) at breeding sites in Canada and compared with similar data from the gulls' wintering grounds in Chile. Resistant E. coli phenotypes were common, most notably to ampicillin (30.1%) and cefadroxil (15.1%). Furthermore, 17.0% of the gulls in Canada carried ESBL producing bacteria, which is higher than reported from human datasets from the same country. However, compared to gulls sampled in Chile (30.1%) the prevalence of ESBL was much lower. The dominant ESBL variants in Canada were bla(CTX-M-14) and bla(CTX-M-15) and differed in proportions to the data from Chile. We hypothesize that the observed differences in ESBL variants are more likely linked to recent exposure to bacteria from anthropogenic sources, suggesting high local dissemination of resistant bacteria both at breeding and non-breeding times rather than a significant trans-hemispheric exchange through migrating birds.

National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-47229 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0141315 (DOI)000363309200092 ()26496629 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84949488537 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-11-16 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2020-01-28Bibliographically approved
Stedt, J., Bonnedahl, J., Hernandez, J., McMahon, B. J., Hasan, B., Olsen, B., . . . Waldenström, J. (2014). Antibiotic resistance patterns in Escherichia coli from gulls in nine European countries. Infection Ecology & Epidemiology, 4, Article ID 21565.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Antibiotic resistance patterns in Escherichia coli from gulls in nine European countries
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2014 (English)In: Infection Ecology & Epidemiology, ISSN 2000-8686, E-ISSN 2000-8686, Vol. 4, article id 21565Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The prevalence of antibiotic resistant faecal indicator bacteria from humans and food production animals has increased over the last decades. In Europe, resistance levels in Escherichia coli from these sources show a south-to-north gradient, with more widespread resistance in the Mediterranean region compared to northern Europe. Recent studies show that resistance levels can be high also in wildlife, but it is unknown to what extent resistance levels in nature conform to the patterns observed in human-associated bacteria.

METHODS: To test this, we collected 3,158 faecal samples from breeding gulls (Larus sp.) from nine European countries and tested 2,210 randomly isolated E. coli for resistance against 10 antibiotics commonly used in human and veterinary medicine.

RESULTS: Overall, 31.5% of the gull E. coli isolates were resistant to ≥1 antibiotic, but with considerable variation between countries: highest levels of isolates resistant to ≥1 antibiotic were observed in Spain (61.2%) and lowest levels in Denmark (8.3%). For each tested antibiotic, the Iberian countries were either the countries with the highest levels or in the upper range in between-country comparisons, while northern countries generally had a lower proportion of resistant E. coli isolates, thereby resembling the gradient of resistance seen in human and food animal sources.

CONCLUSION: We propose that gulls may serve as a sentinel of environmental levels of antibiotic resistant E. coli to complement studies of human-associated microbiota.

National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-33715 (URN)10.3402/iee.v4.21565 (DOI)24427451 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-04-09 Created: 2014-04-09 Last updated: 2020-01-28Bibliographically approved
Bonnedahl, J., Hernandez, J., Stedt, J., Waldenström, J., Olsen, B. & Drobni, M. (2014). Extended-Spectrum beta-Lactamases in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in Gulls, Alaska, USA [Letter to the editor]. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(5), 897-899
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Extended-Spectrum beta-Lactamases in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in Gulls, Alaska, USA
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2014 (English)In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 897-899Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
National Category
Immunology
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-34642 (URN)10.3201/eid2005.130325 (DOI)000335124900031 ()2-s2.0-84898881765 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-06-04 Created: 2014-06-04 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved
Vredenburg, J., Varela, A. R., Hasan, B., Bertilsson, S., Olsen, B., Narciso-da-Rocha, C., . . . Manaia, C. M. (2014). Quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from birds of prey in Portugal are genetically distinct from those isolated from water environments and gulls in Portugal, Spain and Sweden. Environmental Microbiology, 16(4), 995-1004
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from birds of prey in Portugal are genetically distinct from those isolated from water environments and gulls in Portugal, Spain and Sweden
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2014 (English)In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 995-1004Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The influence of geographic distribution and type of habitat on the molecular epidemiology of ciprofloxacin resistant Escherichia coli was investigated. Ciprofloxacin resistant E. coli from wastewater, urban water with faecal contamination and faeces of gulls, pigeons and birds of prey, from Portugal, Spain and Sweden were compared based on multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and quinolone resistance genetic determinants. Multi-locus sequence typing allowed the differentiation of E. coli lineages associated with birds of prey from those inhabiting gulls and waters. E. coli lineages of clinical relevance, such as the complex ST131, were detected in wastewater, streams and gulls in Portugal, Spain and Sweden. Quinolone resistance was due to gyrA and parC mutations, although distinct mutations were detected in birds of prey and in wastewater, streams and gulls isolates. These differences were correlated with specific MLST lineages, suggesting resistance inheritance. Among the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes, only aac(6 ')-ib-cr and qnrS were detected in wastewater, streams and gulls isolates, but not in birds of prey. The horizontal transfer of the gene aac(6 ')-ib-cr could be inferred from its occurrence in different MLST lineages.

National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-34071 (URN)10.1111/1462-2920.12231 (DOI)000333713300008 ()2-s2.0-84898057757 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-05-05 Created: 2014-05-05 Last updated: 2020-01-28Bibliographically approved
Hernandez, J., Johansson, A., Stedt, J., Bengtsson, S., Porczak, A., Granholm, S., . . . Drobni, M. (2013). Characterization and Comparison of Extended-Spectrum beta-Lactamase (ESBL) Resistance Genotypes and Population Structure of Escherichia coli Isolated from Franklin's Gulls (Leucophaeus pipixcan) and Humans in Chile. PLoS ONE, 8(9), Article ID e76150.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterization and Comparison of Extended-Spectrum beta-Lactamase (ESBL) Resistance Genotypes and Population Structure of Escherichia coli Isolated from Franklin's Gulls (Leucophaeus pipixcan) and Humans in Chile
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2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 9, article id e76150Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We investigated the general level of antibiotic resistance with further analysis of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) prevalence, as well as the population structure of E. coli in fecal flora of humans and Franklin's gulls (Leucophaeus pipixcan) in central parts of Chile. We found a surprisingly high carriage rate of ESBL-producing E. coli among the gulls 112/372 (30.1%) as compared to the human population 6/49 (12.2%.) Several of the E. coli sequence types (STs) identified in birds have previously been reported as Multi Drug Resistant (MDR) human pathogens including the ability to produce ESBLs. This means that not only commensal flora is shared between birds and humans but also STs with pathogenic potential. Given the migratory behavior of Franklin's gulls, they and other migratory species, may be a part of ESBL dissemination in the environment and over great geographic distances. Apart from keeping the antibiotic use low, breaking the transmission chains between the environment and humans must be a priority to hinder the dissemination of resistance.

National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-30651 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0076150 (DOI)000325423500144 ()2-s2.0-84884781295 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-11-22 Created: 2013-11-22 Last updated: 2020-01-28Bibliographically approved
Hernandez, J., Stedt, J., Bonnedahl, J., Molin, Y., Drobni, M., Calisto-Ulloa, N., . . . Olsen, B. (2012). Human-Associated Extended-Spectrum beta-Lactamase in the Antarctic. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 78(6), 2056-2058
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human-Associated Extended-Spectrum beta-Lactamase in the Antarctic
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2012 (English)In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 78, no 6, p. 2056-2058Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Escherichia coli bacteria with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) type CTX-M resistance were isolated from water samples collected close to research stations in Antarctica. The isolates had bla(CTX-M-1) and bla(CTX-M-15) genotypes and sequence types (ST) indicative of a human-associated origin. This is the first record of ESBL-producing enterobacteria from Antarctica.

Keywords
escherichia-coli, klebsiella-pneumoniae, dissemination, evolution, bacteria, south, gulls, esbl
National Category
Ecology Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-19516 (URN)10.1128/Aem.07320-11 (DOI)000300629800052 ()2-s2.0-84857949702 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-06-05 Created: 2012-06-05 Last updated: 2020-01-28Bibliographically approved
Stedt, J., Waldenström, J., Hernandez, J., Olsen, B. & Drobni, M. (2011). Divergent, and Locally High, Levels of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria in European Herring Gulls (Larus argentatus) Conform to Patterns of Human Clinical Antibiotic Usage. EcoHealth, 7(Supplement 1), S98-S98
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Divergent, and Locally High, Levels of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria in European Herring Gulls (Larus argentatus) Conform to Patterns of Human Clinical Antibiotic Usage
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2011 (English)In: EcoHealth, ISSN 1612-9202, E-ISSN 1612-9210, Vol. 7, no Supplement 1, p. S98-S98Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Natural Science, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-19521 (URN)000287901500170 ()
Available from: 2012-06-05 Created: 2012-06-05 Last updated: 2020-01-28Bibliographically approved
Haemig, P. D., Sjöstedt de Luna, S., Grafström, A., Lithner, S., Lundkvist, Å., Waldenström, J., . . . Olsen, B. (2011). Forecasting risk of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE): using data from wildlife and climate to predict next year's number of human victims.. Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, 43(5), 366-372
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Forecasting risk of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE): using data from wildlife and climate to predict next year's number of human victims.
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2011 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 366-372Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Over the past quarter century, the incidence of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) has increased in most European nations. However, the number of humans stricken by the disease varies from year to year. A method for predicting major increases and decreases is needed.

METHODS: We assembled a 25-y database (1984-2008) of the number of human TBE victims and wildlife and climate data for the Stockholm region of Sweden, and used it to create easy-to-use mathematical models that predict increases and decreases in the number of humans stricken by TBE.

RESULTS: Our best model, which uses December precipitation and mink (Neovison vison, formerly Mustela vison) bagging figures, successfully predicted every major increase or decrease in TBE during the past quarter century, with a minimum of false alarms. However, this model was not efficient in predicting small increases and decreases.

CONCLUSIONS: Predictions from our models can be used to determine when preventive and adaptive programmes should be implemented. For example, in years when the frequency of TBE in humans is predicted to be high, vector control could be intensified where infested ticks have a higher probability of encountering humans, such as at playgrounds, bathing lakes, barbecue areas and camping facilities. Because our models use only wildlife and climate data, they can be used even when the human population is vaccinated. Another advantage is that because our models employ data from previously-established databases, no additional funding for surveillance is required.

National Category
Other Basic Medicine Ecology
Research subject
Biomedical Sciences, Virology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-16655 (URN)10.3109/00365548.2011.552072 (DOI)21254953 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-79954506817 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-01-09 Created: 2012-01-09 Last updated: 2020-01-28Bibliographically approved
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