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Hjelm, Katarina
Publications (10 of 48) Show all publications
Ge, L., Albin, B., Hadziabdic, E., Hjelm, K. & Rask, M. (2016). Beliefs about health and illness and health-realted behavior among urban women with gestational diabetes mellitus in the south east of China. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 27(6), 593-602
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beliefs about health and illness and health-realted behavior among urban women with gestational diabetes mellitus in the south east of China
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Transcultural Nursing, ISSN 1043-6596, E-ISSN 1552-7832, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 593-602Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The incidence of gestational diabetes among Chinese women is 4.3%. No study has previously been conducted about beliefs and health-related behavior among urban Chinese women with this disease. This article aims to explore beliefs about health and illness and health-related behavior among women in this group in a Chinese sociocultural context.

Design: A qualitative exploratory study was conducted and semistructured individual interviews (n = 15) were processed by content analysis.

Results: Beliefs about health and illness among these women were foremost attributed to the individual, social, and natural worlds. They feared the negative influence of gestational diabetes, but some of them believed in “letting nature take its course” and “living in the present.” Their care-seeking behavior varied between the professional, popular, and folk sectors. They sought a balance between following professionals’ advice and avoiding practical difficulties.

Conclusion: The beliefs and health-related behavior among them were influenced by Chinese culture, which can sometimes but not always reduce the effect of the disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2016
Keywords
Diabetes, Gestational, Beliefs, Behavior, Chinese, Culture
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-45819 (URN)10.1177/1043659615594677 (DOI)000385719800008 ()26187924 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84991246297 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-08-21 Created: 2015-08-21 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Hadziabdic, E., Albin, B. & Hjelm, K. (2014). Arabic-speaking migrants’ attitudes, opinions, preferences and past experiences concerning the use of interpreters in healthcare: a postal cross-sectional survey. BMC Research Notes, 7, Article ID 71.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Arabic-speaking migrants’ attitudes, opinions, preferences and past experiences concerning the use of interpreters in healthcare: a postal cross-sectional survey
2014 (English)In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 7, article id 71Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Good communication is an important prerequisite for equal treatment in a healthcare encounter. One way to overcome language barriers when patients and healthcare staff do not share the same language is to use a professional interpreter. Few previous studies have been found investigating the use of interpreters, and just one previous study from the perspective of European migrants, which showed that they perceived interpreters as a communication aid and a guide in the healthcare system as regards information and practical matters. No previous study has gathered quantitative information to focus on non-European migrants’ attitudes to the use of interpreters in healthcare encounters. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate Arabic-speaking individuals’ attitudes, opinions, preferences and past experiences concerning the use of interpreters in healthcare in order to: (i) understand how persons’ expectations and concerns regarding interpreters may vary, both within and across cultural/linguistic populations; (ii) understand the consequences of diverse opinions/expectations for planning responsive services; and (iii) confirm findings from previous qualitative studies.

Method

A postal cross-sectional study using a structured self-administered 51-item questionnaire was used to describe and document aspects of Arabic-speaking individuals’ attitudes to the use of interpreters in healthcare. The sample of 53 Arabic-speaking migrants was recruited from three different places. Participants were mostly born in Iraq and had a high level of education and were almost equally divided between genders. Data were analysed with descriptive statistics.

Results

The main findings were that most of the participants perceived the interpreter’s role as being a communication aid and a practical aid, interpreting literally and objectively. Trust in the professional interpreter was related to qualification as an interpreter and personal contact with face-to-face interaction. The qualities of the desired professional interpreter were: a good knowledge of languages and medical terminology, translation ability, and sharing the same origin, dialect and gender as the patient.

Conclusion

This study confirmed previous qualitative findings from European migrant groups with a different cultural and linguistic background. The study supports the importance of planning a good interpretation situation in accordance with individuals’ desire, irrespective of the migrant’s linguistic and cultural background, and using interpreters who interpret literally and objectively, who are highly trained with language skills in medical terminology, and with a professional attitude to promote communication, thus increasing cost-effective, high-quality individualized healthcare.

Keywords
Arabic-speaking migrants, Communication, Cross-sectional survey, Healthcare encounter, Structured self-administered questionnaire, Use of interpreters
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-32177 (URN)10.1186/1756-0500-7-71 (DOI)2-s2.0-84893840816 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-02-07 Created: 2014-02-07 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Hadziabdic, E. & Hjelm, K. (2014). Arabic-speaking migrants' experiences of the use of interpreters in healthcare: a qualitative explorative study. International Journal for Equity in Health, 13, Article ID 49.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Arabic-speaking migrants' experiences of the use of interpreters in healthcare: a qualitative explorative study
2014 (English)In: International Journal for Equity in Health, ISSN 1475-9276, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 13, article id 49Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Arabic-speaking migrants have constituted a growing population in recent years. This entails major challenges to ensure good communication in the healthcare encounter in order to provide individual and holistic healthcare. One of the solutions to ensure good communication between patient and healthcare staff who do not share the same language is to use a professional interpreter. To our knowledge, no previous qualitative studies have been found concerning Arabic-speaking migrants and the use of interpreters. This study aims to ascertain their individual experiences which can help extend our understanding of the studied area. Method: A purposive sample of 13 Arabic-speaking persons with experience of using interpreters in healthcare encounters. Data were collected between November 2012 and March 2013 by four focus-group interviews and analysed with qualitative analysis according to a method described for focus groups. Results: Four categories appeared from the analysis: 1) The professional interpreter as spokesperson; 2) Different types of interpreters and modes of interpretation adapting to the healthcare encounter; 3) The professional interpreter's task and personal properties affected the use of professional interpreters in a healthcare encounter; 4) Future planning of the use of professional interpreters in a healthcare encounter. The main findings were that the use of interpreters was experienced both as a possibility and as a problem. The preferred type of interpreters depended on the interpreter's dialect and ability to interpret correctly. Besides the professional interpreter's qualities of good skill in language and medical terminology, translation ability, neutrality and objectivity, Arabic-speakingparticipants stated that professional interpreters need to share the same origin, religion, dialect, gender and political views as the patient in order to facilitate the interpreter use and avoid inappropriate treatment. Conclusion: The study showed that the personal qualities of a good interpreter not only cover language ability but also origin, religion, dialect, gender and political views. Thus, there is need to develop strategies for personalized healthcare in order to avoid inappropriate communication, to satisfy the preferences of the person in need of interpreters and improve the impact of interpretation on the quality of healthcare.

Keywords
Arabic-speaking persons, Focus group interview, Interpreters, Healthcare, Qualitative content analysis
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-35835 (URN)10.1186/1475-9276-13-49 (DOI)000338369700002 ()2-s2.0-84903750655 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-07-01 Created: 2014-07-01 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Albin, B., Hjelm, K. & Elmståhl, S. (2014). Comparison of Stroke mortality in Finnish-born migrants living in Sweden 1970-1999 and in Swedish-born individuals. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 16(1), 18-23
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of Stroke mortality in Finnish-born migrants living in Sweden 1970-1999 and in Swedish-born individuals
2014 (English)In: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, ISSN 1557-1912, E-ISSN 1557-1920, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 18-23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A limited number of studies have been found on stroke mortality in migrants showing higher mortality for some groups. Influence of time of residence has been studied by one research group. An earlier study showed a significantly higher number of deaths in Diseases of the circulatory system in Finnish migrants compared with native Swedes. To test the hypothesis of a higher mortality in and a decrease in mortality over time in stroke among Finnish migrants in Sweden. The study was based on National Population data, the study population included 321,407 Swedish and 307,174 foreign born persons living in Sweden 1987-1999. Mean age was lower at time for death for Finnish migrants than native Swedes, men 5.1 years difference and women 2.3 years. The difference decreased over time. The risk of death by stroke was higher for migrants with short time of residence than with long time (<= 10 years, OR 1.61-1.36 vs >= 11 year, OR 1.18). Migrants with short time of residence died 9.8-5.3 years earlier than native Swedes. The hypothesis was confirmed and an indication of adjustment to life in the new country was found. International studies show similar results for other migrant groups but further studies are needed to verify if the same pattern can be found in other migrants groups in Sweden and to generalise the findings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2014
Keywords
Stroke; Mortality; Sweden; Migrants; Finnish-born
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-23379 (URN)10.1007/s10903-013-9780-1 (DOI)000332651900003 ()23324988 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84895030102 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-01-09 Created: 2013-01-09 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Hadziabdic, E., Albin, B., Heikkilä, K. & Hjelm, K. (2014). Family members’ experiences of the use of interpreters in healthcare. Primary Health Care Research and Development, 15(2), 156-169
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family members’ experiences of the use of interpreters in healthcare
2014 (English)In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, ISSN 1463-4236, E-ISSN 1477-1128, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 156-169Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim The aim was to explore adults’ experiences of their family members’ use of interpreters in health-care encounters.

Background Language barriers are a major hindrance for migrants to receive appropriate healthcare. In a foreign country, family members often need support in care of migrant patients. No previous studies focusing on adult family members’ experiences of the use of interpreters in healthcare have been found.

Method A purposive sample of 10 adult family members with experiences of the use of interpreters in health-care encounters. Data were collected between May and September 2009 by focus-group interviews and analysed with qualitative analysis according to a method described for focus groups.

Findings Three categories emerged from the analysis: (1) Experiences of the use of professional interpreters, (2) Experiences of being used as an interpreter and (3) Experiences of what needs to be improved when using interpreters. The main findings showed no agreement in family members’ experiences; interpretation should be individually and situationally adapted. However, when family members acted as interpreters, their role was to give both practical and emotional support, and this led to both positive and negative emotions. Use of simple language, better collaboration in the health-care organization and developing the interpreters’ professional attitude could improve the use of professional interpreters. The type of interpreter, mode of interpretation and patient's preferences should be considered in the interpretation situation. In order to achieve high-quality healthcare, health-care professionals need to organize a good interpretation situation case-by-case, choose the appropriate interpreters with the patient in focus and cooperate with members of the patient's social network.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2014
Keywords
communication barriers, family members, interpreters
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-16226 (URN)10.1017/S1463423612000680 (DOI)000209619500005 ()23402584 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84893819780 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-12-18 Created: 2011-12-18 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
Hjelm, K. & Bard, K. (2013). Beliefs about health and illness in Latin-American migrants with diabetes living in Sweden. Open Nursing Journal, 7, 57-65, Article ID TONURSJ-7-57.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beliefs about health and illness in Latin-American migrants with diabetes living in Sweden
2013 (English)In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 7, p. 57-65, article id TONURSJ-7-57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study explored beliefs about health and illness in Latin American migrants diagnosed with diabetes mellitus (DM) living in Sweden, and investigated the influence on health-related behavior including self-care and care-seeking behavior. Migrants are particularly affected in the diabetes pandemia. Beliefs about health and illness determine health-related behaviour and health but no studies have been found on Latin American migrants with DM. An explorative study design with focus-group interviews of nine persons aged 36-77 years from a diabetes clinic was used. Health was described from a pathogenetic or a salutogenetic perspective: 'freedom from disease or feeling of well-being', and being autonomous and able to work. Economic hardship due to expenses for medications and food for DM affected health. Individual factors such as diet, exercise and compliance with advice, and social factors with good social relations and avoidance of stress, often caused by having experienced severe events related to migrational experiences, were considered important for maintaining health and could cause DM. Disturbed relations to others (social factors), punishment by God or Fate (supernatural factors), intake of diuretics and imbalance between warmth and cold (natural factors) were also perceived as causes. A mix of biomedical and traditional explanations and active self-care behaviour with frequent use of herbs was found. It is important to assess the individual's beliefs, and health professionals, particularly nurses, should incorporate discussions of alternative treatments and other components of explanatory models and co-operate with social workers to consider influence of finances and migrational experiences on health.

Keywords
Beliefs about health/illness, Care-seeking behaviour, Diabetes mellitus, Latin americans, Migrants, Self-care
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-63042 (URN)10.2174/1874434601307010057 (DOI)2-s2.0-84876089356 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-05-08 Created: 2017-05-08 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Lindqvist, G., Heikkilä, K., Albin, B. & Hjelm, K. (2013). Conceptions of daily life in men living with a woman suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Primary Health Care Research and Development, 14(02), 140-150
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conceptions of daily life in men living with a woman suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
2013 (English)In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, ISSN 1463-4236, E-ISSN 1477-1128, Vol. 14, no 02, p. 140-150Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim To describe conceptions of daily life in men living with a woman suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in different stages of the disease. BACKGROUND: A chronic disease like COPD affects not only the person living with the illness, but also the spouse. Significant tasks and demands are placed on husbands. COPD has for a long time been considered more a man's disease than a woman's disease, but according to new evidence COPD is a vast problem in women, which requires support from their spouses. The literature review did not reveal any previous studies concerning conceptions of daily life in men living with women suffering from COPD in different stages. METHODS: A phenomenographic study was conducted. Data were collected from October 2008 to October 2009 through semi-structured interviews with 19 men living with a woman suffering from COPD. Findings Two main descriptive categories were found: (1) unchanged life situation where no support was needed; (2) changed life situation related to severity of COPD, where support was needed. The categories were described from the perspective 'ME and my spouse'. Even in their caregiving situation, the men continued with their own life and activities and did not put themselves in second place. No support was needed from healthcare or municipality when the women had mild COPD, but this changed when the COPD progressed. The men felt that daily life was burdened, restricted and the partner relationship was affected, even if the disease had not reached the final stage. The COPD forced them gradually into a caregiving role, and their daily life changed. They become more of a caregiver than a spouse. The men experienced lack of knowledge and support, and they felt that health professionals and municipality did not care about them.

Keywords
COPD, everyday life, male spouses, nursing, phenomenography
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-23123 (URN)10.1017/S1463423612000394 (DOI)000209618900005 ()23026500 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84883161471 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-12-20 Created: 2012-12-20 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
Lindqvist, G., Albin, B., Heikkilä, K. & Hjelm, K. (2013). Conceptions of daily life in women living with a man suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Primary Health Care Research and Development, 14(01), 40-51
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conceptions of daily life in women living with a man suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
2013 (English)In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, ISSN 1463-4236, E-ISSN 1477-1128, Vol. 14, no 01, p. 40-51Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim To describe conceptions of daily life in women living with a man suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in different stages.

Background The spouse is often the primary caregiver to someone with COPD, and thus also affected by the consequences of the disease. No previous studies have been found focusing on conceptions of daily life in women living with a man suffering from COPD in different stages.

Methods A phenomenographic study was conducted. Data were collected in 2008–2009 through semi-structured interviews with 21 women living with men suffering from COPD in different stages.

Findings Four main descriptive categories were found: unchanged life situation where no support was needed; socially restricted life and changed roles; changes in health; and changes in the couple's relationship where support was needed. The categories are described in relation to the woman herself, in relation to the man, and in relation to others. No support was needed from society or health care when the men had mild COPD and the women experienced no change in their daily life. As the disease progressed, the women's responsibilities increased and their role changed from being a spouse to being an informal carer. Social contacts became limited, and they began to feel isolated. The women prioritized their spouse's health and well-being and compromised their own health. They experienced lack of support from health professionals and from the municipality.

Keywords
COPD, everday life, female spouses, nursing, phenomenography
National Category
Nursing Sociology
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-23122 (URN)10.1017/S146342361200031X (DOI)000209618700005 ()22785223 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84879778419 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-01-07 Created: 2012-12-20 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
Abdulhadi, N. M. N., Al-Shafaee, M. A., Wahlström, R. & Hjelm, K. (2013). Doctors' and nurses' views on patient care for type 2 diabetes: an interview study in primary health care in Oman. Primary Health Care Research and Development, 14(3), 258-269
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Doctors' and nurses' views on patient care for type 2 diabetes: an interview study in primary health care in Oman
2013 (English)In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, ISSN 1463-4236, E-ISSN 1477-1128, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 258-269Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: This study aimed at exploring the experiences of primary health-care providers of their encounters with patients with type 2 diabetes, and their preferences and suggestions for future improvement of diabetes care. Background: Barriers to good diabetes care could be related to problems from health-care providers' side, patients' side or the healthcare system of the country. Treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes has become a huge challenge in Oman, where the prevalence has increased to high levels. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 26 health-care professionals, 19 doctors and seven nurses, who worked in primary health care in Oman. Qualitative content analysis was applied. Findings: Organizational barriers and barriers related to patients and healthcare providers were identified. These included workload and lack of teamwork approach. Poor patients' management adherence and influence of culture on their attitudes towards illness were identified. From the providers' side, language barriers, providers' frustration and aggressive attitudes towards the patients were reflected. Decreasing the workload, availability of competent teams with diabetes specialist nurses and continuity of care were suggested. Furthermore, changing professional behaviours towards a more patient-centred approach and need for health education to the patients, especially on self-management, were addressed. Appropriate training for health-care providers in communication skills with emphasis on self-care education and individualization of care according to each patient's needs are important for improvement of diabetes care in Oman.

Keywords
culture, Oman, patient-provider interaction, professional behaviour, qualitative content analysis
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-56668 (URN)10.1017/S146342361200062X (DOI)000209619100006 ()2-s2.0-84894327084 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-21 Created: 2016-09-21 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Hjelm, K. & Beebwa, E. (2013). The influence of beliefs about health and illness on foot care in ugandan persons with diabetic foot ulcers. Open Nursing Journal, 7(1), 123-132
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The influence of beliefs about health and illness on foot care in ugandan persons with diabetic foot ulcers
2013 (English)In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 123-132Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Diabetes mellitus is becoming pandemic, particularly affecting Sub-Saharan Africa, and the prevalence of complications is increasing. Diabetic foot disorders are a major source of morbidity and disability. Delay in the health care process due to patients' beliefs may have deleterious consequences for limb and life in persons with diabetic foot ulcers. No previous studies of beliefs about health and illness in persons with diabetic foot ulcers living in Africa have been found. The aim of the study was to explore beliefs about health and illness among Ugandans with diabetic foot ulcers that might affect self-care and care seeking behavior. In an explorative study with consecutive sample semi-structured interviews were held with 14 Ugandan men and women, aged 40-79, with diabetic foot ulcer. Knowledge was limited about causes, management and prevention of diabetic foot ulcers. Foot ulcers were often detected as painful sores, perceived to heal or improve, and led to stress and social isolation due to smell and reduced mobility. Most lacked awareness of the importance of complete daily foot care and seldom practiced self-care. Health was described as absence of disease and pain. Many feared future health and related it to contact with nurses in the professional sector from whom they sought information, blood tests and wound dressings and desired better organised diabetes clinics offering health education and more opening hours. Many have an under utilized potential for self-care and need education urgently, delivered in well-organised diabetes clinics working to raise awareness of the threat and prevent foot ulcers.

Keywords
Africans, Attitudes to health/illness, Beliefs about health/illness, Care-seeking behavior, Diabetes mellitus complications, Foot ulcer, Self-care
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-59348 (URN)10.2174/1874434601307010123 (DOI)2-s2.0-84884172592 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-05-08 Created: 2017-05-08 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
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