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Westin, E., Gustafsson, I., Svensson, A., Sund-Levander, M. & Elmqvist, C. (2024). Advising parents when their child has a fever: a phenomenographic analysis of nurses’ perceptions when working at a telephone helpline, at primary care or at a paediatric emergency department in Sweden. BMJ Open, 14(1), Article ID e074823.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Advising parents when their child has a fever: a phenomenographic analysis of nurses’ perceptions when working at a telephone helpline, at primary care or at a paediatric emergency department in Sweden
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2024 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 14, no 1, article id e074823Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives To describe nurses’ perceptions of advising parents when their child has a fever.

Design/method Inductive, descriptive study with a qualitative, phenomenographic approach. Participants and setting A purposive sampling was used. To be included, the 24 online interviewed nurses had to have experience advising parents of febrile children between birth and 5 years of age. They were recruited from three different parts of the healthcare system from four regions in the south of Sweden.

Results The nurses described advising parents when their child has a fever as four different kinds of balancing acts: balancing between the parents’ story and objective assessment, balancing between listening and teaching, balancing between self-confidence and trust in the expert, and balancing between independence and having someone by one’s side.

Conclusions Giving advice to parents when their child has a fever is a process where the nurse needs to listen, assess and give advice based on the situation. This requires a correct assessment that depends on the parents’ story. Creating a trusting relationship is perceived as necessary for parents to assimilate the advice that is provided. What dominates are the nurses’ perceptions of the inner qualities required to achieve a balance in the process, for example, the importance of experience and security in their professional role, while it is also necessary to get support from colleagues.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2024
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-127502 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2023-074823 (DOI)001153960500064 ()2-s2.0-85183784825 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Region Kronoberg, 969335
Available from: 2024-02-05 Created: 2024-02-05 Last updated: 2024-02-20Bibliographically approved
Lederman, J., Löfvenmark, C., Djarv, T., Lindström, V. & Elmqvist, C. (2023). A phenomenological interview study with patients being non-conveyed in the ambulance service. BMC Emergency Medicine, 23(1), Article ID 30.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A phenomenological interview study with patients being non-conveyed in the ambulance service
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2023 (English)In: BMC Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1471-227X, E-ISSN 1471-227X, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BackgroundNon-conveyed patients (i.e. patients who are not transported to a hospital after being assessed by ambulance clinicians) represent a significantly increasing proportion of all patients seeking ambulance care. Scientific knowledge about patients' non-conveyance experiences is sparse. This study describes the lived experiences of non-conveyed patients in an ambulance care context.MethodsA reflective lifeworld research (RLR) approach founded on phenomenology is used. Data is derived from nine in-depth interviews with patients not conveyed by the ambulance service in a major Swedish region.ResultsPatients' lived experiences of becoming acutely ill or injured and not conveyed by ambulance to a hospital are characterised by several dynamic movements: losing and regaining situational and bodily control, dependence and autonomy, external competence and inner knowledge, handing over and regaining responsibility, and fear and security.ConclusionsPatients' lived experiences of non-conveyance are complex and versatile. Although non-conveyed patients initially experience strong fear and the loss of situational and bodily control, they gradually feel more secure when experiencing confirmation and trust, which evolves into insecurity and uncertainty. The non-conveyance situation's complexity from a patient's perspective implies the need for ambulance organisations to take measures to prevent further suffering. Non-conveyed patients must be taken seriously in their unique situations, requiring ambulance clinicians to reflect and act with a conscious ethical perspective before, during and after their visit.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Patients' perspectives, Emergency medical services [MeSH], Ambulance care, Non-conveyance, Caring encounter, Phenomenology
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-120588 (URN)10.1186/s12873-023-00797-8 (DOI)000952239600003 ()36927353 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85150314688 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-05-05 Created: 2023-05-05 Last updated: 2023-09-07Bibliographically approved
Almgren Bäck, G., Lindeblad, E., Elmqvist, C. & Svensson, I. (2023). Dyslexic students' experiences in using assistive technology to support written language skills: a five-year follow-up. Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dyslexic students' experiences in using assistive technology to support written language skills: a five-year follow-up
2023 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

PurposeThis study presents several accounts of user experiences with assistive technology (AT). Although previous studies on dyslexic students reported promising results from using audiobooks, text-to-speech (TTS), and speech-to-text (STT), qualitative research is relatively sparse and short-term, and little is known about adolescents' long-term experiences of using AT in schools. Therefore, this five-year follow-up study aimed to describe dyslexic students' experiences of AT.Materials and methodsNine students with dyslexia were interviewed using a semi-structured framework and a descriptive pattern-based thematic analysis. The students had previously participated in an AT intervention in Sweden.ResultsThree main themes are reported: Contextual factors: facilitators or barriers; Emotional responses in the learning environment; Developing meaningful strategies. The results align with previous research findings that audiobooks are beneficial throughout the school years, while STT is of mixed utility. TTS was mainly used in learning to decode texts. Continued AT use is discussed thematically, concretising experiences connected to schools' multilevel support.ConclusionsThis study can contribute to the development of AT academic practices enriched by users' views. The findings reveal factors enabling or hindering students' continued AT usage. Contextual factors in schools concern organisational elements rather than AT accessibility. Students' emotional responses (using AT in the classroom) are influenced by dyslexia self-acceptance and AT attitudes. Students' understanding of how and why to use AT may limit the development of meaningful strategies. Implications and suggested further research are provided to improve dyslexic students' AT experiences and success in school.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2023
Keywords
Reading and writing disability, dyslexia, assistive technology, experiences, thematic analysis
National Category
Learning
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-119818 (URN)10.1080/17483107.2022.2161647 (DOI)000931998500001 ()36641779 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85146323355 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-17 Created: 2023-03-17 Last updated: 2023-11-07
Säll-Hansson, K., Lindqvist, G., Stening, K., Fohlman, J., Wojanowski, A., Ponten, M., . . . Elmqvist, C. (2023). Efficacy of mecobalamin (vitamin B12) in the treatment of long-term pain in women diagnosed with fibromyalgia: protocol for a randomised, placebo-controlled trial. BMJ Open, 13(3), Article ID e066987.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Efficacy of mecobalamin (vitamin B12) in the treatment of long-term pain in women diagnosed with fibromyalgia: protocol for a randomised, placebo-controlled trial
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2023 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 3, article id e066987Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Fibromyalgia causes long-term pain. It affects at least 2% of the population, the majority being women. In addition, extended symptoms corresponding to vitamin B12 deficiency occur. Findings from several studies have indicated that vitamin B12 may be a possible treatment for pain in fibromyalgia. The aim of the proposed study is to evaluate whether vitamin B12 decreases pain sensitivity and the experience of pain (ie, hyperalgesia and allodynia) in women with fibromyalgia.

METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The study is a randomised, placebo-controlled, single-blind, clinical trial with two parallel groups which are administered mecobalamin (vitamin B12) or placebo over 12 weeks. 40 Swedish women aged 20-70 years with an earlier recorded diagnosis of fibromyalgia are randomised into the placebo group or the treatment group, each consisting of 20 participants. Outcomes consist of questionnaires measured at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment. A final re-evaluation will then follow 12 weeks after treatment ends. The primary outcome is tolerance time, maximised to 3 min, which is assessed using the cold pressor test. In order to broaden the understanding of the lived experience of participants, qualitative interviews will be conducted using a phenomenological approach on a lifeworld theoretical basis (reflective lifeworld research approach).

ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The protocol for the study is approved by the local ethical committee at Linkoping (EPM; 2018/294-31, appendices 2019-00347 and 2020-04482). The principles of the Helsinki Declaration are followed regarding oral and written consent to participate, confidentiality and the possibility to withdraw participation from the study at any time. The results will primarily be communicated through peer-reviewed journals and conferences.

TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT05008042.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2023
Keywords
Complementary medicine, Clinical trials, Pain management, Qualitative research, Statistics & research methods
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology
Research subject
Biomedical Sciences, Pharmacology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-120456 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2022-066987 (DOI)000991985100022 ()36997252 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85151316549 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-04-28 Created: 2023-04-28 Last updated: 2023-12-18Bibliographically approved
Almerud Österberg, S., Hörberg, U., Ozolins, L.-L., Werkander Harstäde, C. & Elmqvist, C. (2023). Exposed: a semantic concept analysis of its origin, meaning change over time and its relevance for caring science. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 18(1), Article ID 2163701.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exposed: a semantic concept analysis of its origin, meaning change over time and its relevance for caring science
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2023 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 2163701Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: A patient is vulnerable and exposed due to illness, relies on and surrender to other people. In caring this means a special dependency. The aim of this study was to describe the origin of the concept ‘exposed’, to elucidate how the definition of this term has changed over time, and to outline its relevance in caring science. Method: A semantic concept analysis in two phases was conducted. Results: The findings show that over time, the degree of binding of the following synonyms has become stronger; unprotected/defenseless, naked/bare, pressed/jostled and unsafe/unprotected and can easily be transferred to a clinical nursing context. Conclusions: This study provides a deeper understanding of the concept 'exposed' semantically. Being exposed is a profound experience for patients who need to be seen as the person they really are. A life-world led care has an existential power that can support professionals, strengthen patients’ health processes, and alleviate the patient’s suffering.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
Caring science, concept analysis, exposedness, nursing care, suffering by care
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-118123 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2022.2163701 (DOI)000905716400001 ()36591614 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85145345133 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-01-03 Created: 2023-01-03 Last updated: 2023-01-30Bibliographically approved
Tengblad, J., Airosa, F., Karlsson, L., Rosenqvist, J., Elmqvist, C., Karlsson, A.-C. & Henricson, M. (2023). "I am Here"-The Importance of Caring Touch in Intensive Care. A Qualitative Observation and Interview Study. Journal of Holistic Nursing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"I am Here"-The Importance of Caring Touch in Intensive Care. A Qualitative Observation and Interview Study
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Holistic Nursing, ISSN 0898-0101, E-ISSN 1552-5724Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of the study was to illuminate the experience of caring touch in intensive care from the perspectives of patients, next-of-kin, and healthcare professionals. Design and Method: This study was explorative, and data were collected through qualitative observations (n = 9) with subsequent interviews (n = 27) at two general intensive care units. An inductive approach was embraced to be open-minded to the participants' experiences. Findings: The results are presented in one generic category-caring touch creates presence-which generated five subcategories: to touch and be touched with respect, touch as guidance and communication, touch causes suffering, touch creates compassion, and touch creates security. Conclusion: When the ability to communicate with words is lost, it is body language that reveals what a person is trying to express. Nurses create a way of being present with the patients by touching them, to communicate I am here for you. Caring touch is a tool to show compassion and respect and to protect the integrity of the lived body. The caring touch is soothing and comforting for the patient and next-of-kin and creates security. It also helps to awaken the motivation to get healthy, which is needed in an environment that is foreign.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
adults, group/population, families, touch therapy, intensive care, qualitative content analysis, healthcare professionals
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-125042 (URN)10.1177/08980101231198723 (DOI)001069857900001 ()37735941 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85172320146 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-10-05 Created: 2023-10-05 Last updated: 2023-10-05
Gustafsson, I., Elmqvist, C., Fridlund, B., Schildmeijer, K. & Rask, M. (2023). Nurse anesthetists' perceptions of heat conservation measures in connection with surgery - a phenomenographic study. BMC Nursing, 22(1), Article ID 321.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurse anesthetists' perceptions of heat conservation measures in connection with surgery - a phenomenographic study
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2023 (English)In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 321Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BackgroundTo minimize the risk of perioperative hypothermia, it is recommended that healthcare professionals be familiar with heat conservation measures and use passive and active warming methods, in line with international guidelines. However, there is a low level of adherence perioperatively to the use of heat conservation measures. To understand why, there is a need to capture the nurse anesthetists' perspective. The aim is to describe nurse anesthetists' perceptions of heat conservation measures in connection with surgery.MethodsAn inductive descriptive design with a phenomenographic approach was chosen. A total of 19 nurse anesthetists participated and were interviewed. Data were analyzed according to Larsson and Holmstrom's phenomenographic seven-step model.ResultsSix ways of understanding the phenomenon heat conservation measures in connection with surgery were found: the preventive, the useable, the untenable, the caring, the adaptive, and the routine care approach. These approaches were related to each other in a flexible way, allowing for several to co-exist at the same time, depending on the situation.ConclusionsNurse anesthetists want to prevent the patients' heat loss and maintain normothermia, regardless of the type of surgery. This willingness, motivation, and intention enable the use of heat conservation measures. However, there are perceptions that have an impact, such as doubts and uncertainty, access, time and financial constraints, preconditions, routines or habits, and lack of availability of education/training. These barriers will require support from an organizational level to promote lifelong education and guidelines. As well as offer education at the nurse anesthetists' program.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Experience, Hypothermia, Perception, Perioperative nursing, Phenomenography, Warming
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-125036 (URN)10.1186/s12912-023-01508-1 (DOI)001069487200001 ()37723475 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85171329977 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-10-05 Created: 2023-10-05 Last updated: 2023-11-07Bibliographically approved
Forsgärde, E.-S., Rööst, M., Elmqvist, C., Fridlund, B. & Svensson, A. (2023). Physicians’ experiences and actions in making complex level-of-care decisions during acute situations within older patients’ homes: a critical incident study. BMC Geriatrics, 23(1), Article ID 323.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physicians’ experiences and actions in making complex level-of-care decisions during acute situations within older patients’ homes: a critical incident study
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2023 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 323Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Complex level-of-care decisions involve uncertainty in which decisions are beneficial for older patients. Knowledge of physicians' decision-making during acute situations in older patients' homes is limited. Therefore, this study aimed to describe physicians' experiences and actions in making complex level-of-care decisions during the assessment of older patients in acute situations within their own homes.

Methods: Individual interviews and analyses were performed according to the critical incident technique (CIT). In total, 14 physicians from Sweden were included.

Results: In making complex level-of-care decisions, physicians experienced collaborating with and including older patients, significant others and health care professionals to be essential for making individualized decisions regarding the patients' and their significant others' needs. During decision-making, physicians experienced difficulties when doubt or collaborative obstructions occurred. Physicians' actions involved searching for an understanding of older patients' and their significant others' wishes and needs, considering their unique conditions, guiding them, and adjusting care according to their wishes. Actions further involved promoting collaboration and reaching a consensus with all persons involved.

Conclusion: Physicians strive to individualize complex level-of-care decisions based on older patients' and their significant others' wishes and needs. Furthermore, individualized decisions depend on successful collaboration and consensus among older patients, their significant others and other health care professionals. Therefore, to facilitate individualized level-of-care decisions, the health care organizations need to support physicians when they are making individualized decisions, provide sufficient resources and promote 24 - 7 collaboration between organizations and health care professionals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-120928 (URN)10.1186/s12877-023-04037-3 (DOI)000992883900002 ()37226161 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85160067479 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Linnaeus University
Available from: 2023-05-25 Created: 2023-05-25 Last updated: 2023-06-09Bibliographically approved
Lantz, E., Nilsson, B., Elmqvist, C., Fridlund, B. & Svensson, A. (2023). Serving the community while balancing multiple responsibilities: experiences of working as a paid part-time firefighter. International Journal of Emergency Services (1), 17-38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Serving the community while balancing multiple responsibilities: experiences of working as a paid part-time firefighter
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2023 (English)In: International Journal of Emergency Services, ISSN 2047-0894, E-ISSN 2047-0908, no 1, p. 17-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to describe experiences of working as a paid part-time firefighter (PTF) in Swedish rural areas.Design/methodology/approachAn inductive explorative design was used, based on interviews with 18 paid PTFs in Sweden. Data were analyzed using qualitative latent content analysis.

Findings

Three themes emerged from the interviews and describe paid PTFs’ experiences. The findings provide insights into how firefighters share a strong commitment, how support plays a crucial role, and how training and call-outs contribute to their experiences. Paid PTFs’ experiences are nuanced, ranging from personal limitations and challenges to satisfaction and the contrast with ordinary life.

Practical implications

The implications for fire and rescue service organizations are that they can encourage firefighters’ commitment and pride, as well as the commitment and support of their families and main employers. Further, highlighting the importance of support and facilitating flexibility when on call is crucial. Finally, acknowledging and promoting personal development and facilitating an inclusive culture are important factors for both motivation and satisfaction.

Originality/value

Paid PTFs are under-represented in the literature, despite the reliance on them in Sweden, and this study begins to address the knowledge gap. To improve retention, it is vital to understand paid PTFs work situation: what motivates them, what barriers they face, and how those challenges influence their experiences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2023
Keywords
Commitment, Fire and rescue service, Job satisfaction, Non-career firefighters, Part-time firefighters, Recruitment, Retention, Rural areas
National Category
Work Sciences
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-115736 (URN)10.1108/ijes-03-2022-0018 (DOI)000839615600001 ()2-s2.0-85135781001 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Hållbart sambruk av räddningsaktörer i svensk landsbygd
Funder
The Kamprad Family Foundation, 20202001
Available from: 2022-08-12 Created: 2022-08-12 Last updated: 2023-05-29Bibliographically approved
Forsgärde, E.-S., Rööst, M., Svensson, A., Fridlund, B. & Elmqvist, C. (2023). Support in acute situations when a community health nurse is called: experiences of older patients, their significant others, and involved healthcare professionals- a qualitative interview study. BMC Geriatrics, 23(1), Article ID 608.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Support in acute situations when a community health nurse is called: experiences of older patients, their significant others, and involved healthcare professionals- a qualitative interview study
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2023 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 608Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Care decisions for older patients in acute situations are challenging to make, and there is limited knowledge of support in home healthcare settings, where older patients receive ongoing health care from, for example, community health nurses. Therefore, this study aimed to describe the support for all involved in acute situations when a community health nurse was called, as experienced by older patients, their significant others and healthcare professionals involved.

Methods: The study was conducted using a phenomenological reflective lifeworld research approach, in which meanings of the study phenomenon were analyzed. The included participants were those who had been involved in acute situations. Twelve participants from four acute situations were interviewed. The participant included three older patients, one significant other, four community health nurses, one registered nurse student, one specialist in general practice, and two ambulance personnel, with one being a registered nurse and the other a specialist ambulance nurse.

Results: Support in decision-making was received from the knowledge of temporality, which provided a comprehensive understanding based on past and present knowledge of the older patient. The knowledge of temporality allowed for the early detection of new symptoms and facilitated care decisions tailored to the older patient. There was a dependency on pre-existing mutual interpersonal support, and confidence developed through relational, caring, and medical competence.

Conclusions: The advantages of temporality, confidence and mutual interpersonal support in acute situations highlight the importance of enhancing relational continuity in home healthcare settings and establishing a structural collaboration among community health nurses, specialists in general practice, and ambulance personnel. This collaboration aims to provide support for making decisions regarding tailored care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
aged, ambulance service, community health nurse, general practitioners, nursing homes, patients, primary health care, reflective lifeworld research, support
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-125051 (URN)10.1186/s12877-023-04331-0 (DOI)001075594100002 ()2-s2.0-85173090503 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Linnaeus UniversityThe Kamprad Family Foundation, 2016-0158
Available from: 2023-10-05 Created: 2023-10-05 Last updated: 2023-11-01Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8376-8805

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