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Elmqvist, Carina
Publications (10 of 41) Show all publications
Wireklint, S., Elmqvist, C., Parenti, N. & Göransson, K. E. (2018). A descriptive study of registered nurses’ application of the triage scale RETTS©: a Swedish reliability study. International Emergency Nursing, 38, 21-28
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A descriptive study of registered nurses’ application of the triage scale RETTS©: a Swedish reliability study
2018 (English)In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 38, p. 21-28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

From a patient safety perspective, it is of great importance that decision support systems such as triage scales are evidence based. In the most recent national survey, the majority of Swedish Emergency Departments (EDs) apply the Swedish triage scale known as the Medical Emergency Triage Treatment Scale (METTS), subsequently renamed the Rapid Emergency Triage Treatment Scale (RETTS©). Despite national widespread implementation, there has been limited research on METTS/RETTS©.

Aim

To determine the reliability of application by registered nurses of the RETTS© triage scale in two Swedish emergency departments.

Methods

In this prospective, cross-sectional study at two EDs, 46 written patient scenarios were triaged by 28 registered nurses (RNs). Data were analysed with descriptive statistics and Fleiss kappa (κ).

Results

The RNs allocated 1281 final triage levels. There was concordance in seven (15%) of the scenarios, and dispersion over two or more triage levels in 39 (85%). Dispersion across the stable/unstable patient boundary was found in 21 (46%) scenarios. Fleiss κ was 0.562, i.e. moderate agreement.

Conclusion

The inability of the triage scale to distinguish between stable/unstable patients can lead to serious consequences from a patient safety perspective. No general pattern regarding concordance or dispersion was found.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Emergency service, Hospitals, Patient safety, Patient scenarios, Nurses, Nursing staff, Reliability – reproducibility of results, Triage – emergency service
National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-69816 (URN)10.1016/j.ienj.2017.12.003 (DOI)000432470600005 ()29326039 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-12 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2018-11-01Bibliographically approved
Herault, R. C., Lincke, A., Milrad, M., Forsgärde, E.-S., Elmqvist, C. & Svensson, A. (2018). Design and Evaluation of a 360 Degrees Interactive Video System to Support Collaborative Training for Nursing Students in Patient Trauma Treatment. In: Yang, JC Chang, M Wong, LH Rodrigo, MMT (Ed.), 26TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON COMPUTERS IN EDUCATION (ICCE 2018): . Paper presented at 26th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON COMPUTERS IN EDUCATION, Metro Manila, PHILIPPINES, NOV 26-30, 2018 (pp. 298-303). Asia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design and Evaluation of a 360 Degrees Interactive Video System to Support Collaborative Training for Nursing Students in Patient Trauma Treatment
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2018 (English)In: 26TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON COMPUTERS IN EDUCATION (ICCE 2018) / [ed] Yang, JC Chang, M Wong, LH Rodrigo, MMT, Asia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education, 2018, p. 298-303Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Extreme catastrophe situations are rare in Sweden, which makes training opportunities important to secure the competence among emergency personnel that should be actively involved during those situations. There is a need to conceptualize, design and implement interactive learning environments that allow to educate, train and assess these catastrophe situations more often and in different settings, conditions and places. In order to address these challenges, a prototype system has been designed and developed containing immersive interactive 360 degrees educational videos that are available via a web browser. The content of these videos includes simulated learning scenes of a trauma team working at the hospital emergency department. Different types of interaction mechanisms are integrated within the videos in which learners should act upon and respond. The prototype was tested during the fall term 2017 with 17 students from the specialist nursing program, and four medical experts. These activities were assessed in order to get new insights into issues related to the proposed approach and feedback connected to the usefulness, usability and learnability of the suggested prototype. The initial outcomes of the evaluation indicate that the system can provide students with novel interaction mechanisms to improve their skills and it can be applied as a complementary tool to the methods used currently in their education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Asia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education, 2018
Keywords
emergency preparedness, interactive learning, nurse specialists, trauma, 360 degrees interactive videos
National Category
Media and Communication Technology Nursing
Research subject
Computer and Information Sciences Computer Science, Media Technology; Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-80292 (URN)000456331300047 ()
Conference
26th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON COMPUTERS IN EDUCATION, Metro Manila, PHILIPPINES, NOV 26-30, 2018
Available from: 2019-02-08 Created: 2019-02-08 Last updated: 2019-02-08Bibliographically approved
Svensson, A., Almerud Österberg, S., Fridlund, B., Stening, K. & Elmqvist, C. (2018). Firefighters as First Incident Persons: breaking the chain of events and becoming a new link in the chain of survival. International Journal of Emergency Services, 7(2), 120-133
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Firefighters as First Incident Persons: breaking the chain of events and becoming a new link in the chain of survival
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Emergency Services, ISSN 2047-0894, E-ISSN 2047-0908, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 120-133Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose In order to shorten the response time, two part-time fire departments (FDs) in Sweden initialize a first incident person (FIP) assignment. This is done by alarming the crew manager as an FIP, responding in a separate emergency vehicle, and by arriving at the scene before rest of the crew. The purpose of this paper is to explore and describe experiences of the FIP assignment within an FD. Design/methodology/approach A multimethod design was used, influenced by Creswell and Plano Clark's (2011) explanatory sequential mixed method design including emergency reports, a questionnaire and interviews. Findings The results show that the FIP assignment was a function that secured an early presence at the scene of an accident or emergency situations, which is beneficial for society in the form of a safety factor, for the firefighters in the form of early prior information on what to expect at the scene and for the patient in the form of early existential support and increased chances of survival. Originality/value In order to prevent full scenarios to happen and get the chance to save lives, an early response must be ensured. Hence, studies must be made in different settings, based on its unique conditions. This study indicates that by implementing FIP in FDs placed in a rural area, the FIP can break the chain of events and becoming a new link in the chain of survival.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-69815 (URN)10.1108/IJES-10-2017-0051 (DOI)000432829500004 ()
Available from: 2018-01-12 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2019-01-16Bibliographically approved
Herault, R. C., Sotsenko, A., Milrad, M., Forsgärde, E.-S. & Elmqvist, C. (2018). Using 360-degrees interactive videos inpatient trauma treatment education: design, development and evaluationaspects. Smart Learning Environments, 5, Article ID 26.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using 360-degrees interactive videos inpatient trauma treatment education: design, development and evaluationaspects
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2018 (English)In: Smart Learning Environments, E-ISSN 2196-7091, Vol. 5, article id 26Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Extremely catastrophic situations are rare in Sweden, which makes training opportunities important to ensure competence among emergency personnel who should be actively involved during such situations. There is a requirement to conceptualize, design, and implement an interactive learning environment that allows the education, training and assessment of these catastrophic situations more often, and in different environments, conditions and places. Therefore, to address these challenges, a prototype system has been designed and developed, containing immersive, interactive 360-degrees videos that are available via a web browser. The content of these videos includes situations such as simulated learning scenes of a trauma team working at the hospital emergency department. Various forms of interactive mechanisms are integrated within the videos, to which learners should respond and act upon. The prototype was tested during the fall term of 2017 with 17 students (working in groups), from a specialist nursing program, and four experts. The video recordings of these study sessions were analyzed and the outcomes are presented in this paper. Different group interaction patterns with the proposed tool were identified. Furthermore, new requirements for refining the 360-degrees interactive video, and the technical challenges associated with the production of this content, have been found during the study. The results of our evaluation indicate that the system can provide the students with novel interaction mechanisms, to improve their skills, and it can be used as a complementary tool for the teaching and learning methods currently used in their education process.

Keywords
Simulation, 360-degrees interactive video, Video coding, Nurse education, Smart learning environments
National Category
Media and Communication Technology
Research subject
Computer and Information Sciences Computer Science, Media Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-80036 (URN)10.1186/s40561-018-0074-x (DOI)
Available from: 2019-01-30 Created: 2019-01-30 Last updated: 2019-01-30Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, I., Elmqvist, C., From Attebring, M., Johansson, I. & Rask, M. (2017). The nurse anesthetists´adherence to Swedish national recommendations to maintain normothermia in patients during surgery. Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, 32(5), 409-418
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The nurse anesthetists´adherence to Swedish national recommendations to maintain normothermia in patients during surgery
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 409-418Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The aim of this study was to determine if nurse anesthetists (NAs) have access, knowledge, and adhere to recommended guidelines to maintain normal body temperature during the perioperative period.

Design

A descriptive survey design.

Methods

Questionnaires were sent to heads of the department (n = 56) and NAs in the operating departments in Sweden.

Finding

The level of access to the recommendations is high, but only one third of the operating departments have included the recommendations in their own local guidelines. The NAs' adherence was low, between 5% and 67%, and their knowledge levels were 57% to 60%.

Conclusions

A high level of knowledge, access, and adherence are important for the organization of operating departments to prevent barriers against implementation of new recommendations or guidelines. There are needs for education about patients' heat loss due to redistribution and clear recommendations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Adherence, Nurse anesthetist, Perioperative hypothermia, Recommendations
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-50034 (URN)10.1016/j.jopan.2016.03.006 (DOI)000412599200004 ()28938976 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-03-27 Created: 2017-03-27 Last updated: 2017-10-30Bibliographically approved
Svensson, A., Fridlund, B., Wångmar, E. & Elmqvist, C. (2016). Home healthcare nurses’ experiences of being on stand by as a first responder in a ‘While Waiting For the Ambulance’ assignment. Nordic journal of nursing research, 36(4), 184-191
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Home healthcare nurses’ experiences of being on stand by as a first responder in a ‘While Waiting For the Ambulance’ assignment
2016 (English)In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 184-191Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study is to describe experiences of the ‘While Waiting for the Ambulance’ (WWFA) assignment, as described by home healthcare nurses (HHCNs). Since the early 1990s, municipal resources in Sweden, preferably firefighters, have been dispatched on WWFA. In order to further assist the local residents on an island in the southwest of Sweden, HHCNs have recently begun accompanying firefighters on WWFA. A reflective lifeworld approach was used for data analysis including in-depth interviews with eight HHCNs. When WWFA was established, the HHCNs experienced lack of clarity in where their responsibilities start and end. A split role is described, and there is a paradox in that the responders are meant to collaborate toward saving lives, when the assignment itself has a lack of collaborative structure. Ethical dilemmas and inner emotional worries led to the nurses expressing a need for support before, during and after WWFA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2016
Keywords
First responder, Home healthcare, Nurses experiences, Phenomenology, Prehospital emergency care
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-50716 (URN)10.1177/2057158516637236 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-03-15 Created: 2016-03-15 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Elmqvist, C. (2016). Inhabiting the interspaces within emergency care. European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare, 4(1), 196-207
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inhabiting the interspaces within emergency care
2016 (English)In: European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare, ISSN 2052-5648, E-ISSN 2052-5656, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 196-207Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To describe and develop an understanding of the patient’s first encounter with different professionals at the scene of an accident and at the emergency department (ED), with a special focus on describing the meaning of emergency care of patients in these care contexts.

Design and Methods: The study, having a descriptive design, was carried out with a reflective lifeworld (RLR) approach founded on phenomenological philosophy

Results: The general structure revealed that emergency care is characterized by a hand-over of responsibility, which is characterized by life-saving medical actions and constitutes a doing. Those life-saving actions need a conscious presence, which at the same time means an existential support for the patient that is constituted by a being. The responsibility then intertwines the doing and the being and all persons involved are brought together into a mutual space. When the patient’s condition allows for increased physical distance from the professionals, a gap or an interspace in the intertwining between doing and being arises as well as an interspace in the patient's understanding of the encounter. For the patient and next-of-kin, this interspace means an empty space with paradoxical feelings of being interesting and at the same time uninteresting - a paradox of care. For the professionals, this interspace provides a needed  breathing space, but also feelings of being split between the high demands of efficiency and the patient's need for existential support and a meaningful encounter - an ethical dilemma.

Discussion: Knowledge of the temporal meaning ofthe encounter, to be here andnow,can give professionals an opportunityto fillthe interspacedespite increasingphysical distance as patient health improves. Furthermore, it will also give professionals an opportunity toreflect on howthe available timeis used.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The University of Buckingham Press Ltd, 2016
Keywords
Emergency care, Emergency department, Lived experiences, Phenomenology, Scene of an accident, Time perception
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-46331 (URN)10.5750/ejpch.v4i1.1070 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-09-16 Created: 2015-09-16 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Säll-Hansson, K., Elmqvist, C., Lindqvist, G. & Stening, K. (2016). Meanings of chronic pain in patient interactions with health services (1ed.). In: Simon van Rysewyk (Ed.), Meanings of pain: (pp. 295-307). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Meanings of chronic pain in patient interactions with health services
2016 (English)In: Meanings of pain / [ed] Simon van Rysewyk, Springer, 2016, 1, , p. 295-307p. 295-307Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Chronic pain causes suffering for patients and managing chronic pain is one of the most common assignments in the health service. Health care professionals can profoundly influence the meaning patients and their families attribute to pain experience. Patients with chronic pain may feel discredited and called into question by skeptical medical professionals. Patients may have to fight to receive entitled care and to suggest suitable treatments. To contribute to medical decision-making and improved patient outcomes, health care professionals should integrate phenomenological narratives and stories about pain into health care in parallel with consulting the medical evidence. Professional care structures should not make health care professionals feel torn between meeting patient needs for existential support and the demand of meeting high clinical work-loads. Narratives and stories can provide shared structures that allow patients and medical professionals to make decisions that feel meaningful, accurate, and clear. Many patients use psychological strategies in their everyday lives in order to live meaningfully with persistent pain; but, this is not enough. Healthcare professionals need “dare to open up and accept personal and deep conversations with patients” about their pain experiences and the lived consequences of persistent pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016. p. 295-307 Edition: 1
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-60906 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-49022-9_18 (DOI)9783319490212 (ISBN)9783319490229 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-02-23 Created: 2017-02-23 Last updated: 2017-02-27Bibliographically approved
Forsgärde, E.-S., From Attebring, M. & Elmqvist, C. (2016). Powerlessness: dissatisfied patients' and relatives' experiences of their emergency department visit. International Emergency Nursing, 25(March 2016), 32-36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Powerlessness: dissatisfied patients' and relatives' experiences of their emergency department visit
2016 (English)In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 25, no March 2016, p. 32-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim

The aim of this study was to disclose the meaning of patients and relatives lived experience of dissatisfaction when visiting an emergency department.

Introduction

Even though most patients are pleased with the emergency department care, there are areas that dissatisfy them, for example lack of communication and unoccupied wait time. However, there are few studies that describe both patients and relatives experience of dissatisfaction.

Methods

This explorative study uses a phenomenological hermeneutic approach where patients and relatives were interviewed.

Results

Patients and relatives meaning of dissatisfaction mainly contain powerlessness, struggling for control over the situation, lacking knowledge and information, receiving and providing support.

Conclusions

The results showed that the experiences of dissatisfaction were similar among patients and relatives. They suffer in the same way when being treated like objects during their visits. Nursing rounds are one way to decrease dissatisfaction by making patients and relatives participating in the care continually updated with information.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Emergency department, Nursing, Patient, Phenomenological hermeneutic, Relative, Satisfaction
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-46330 (URN)10.1016/j.ienj.2015.07.004 (DOI)000372763100007 ()2-s2.0-84960461471 (Scopus ID)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2015-09-16 Created: 2015-09-16 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Elmqvist, C., Montan, C. & Sohl, A. (2016). Trauma (1ed.). In: Christine Kumlien & Jenny Rystedt (Ed.), Omvårdnad & kirurgi: (pp. 57-74). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trauma
2016 (Swedish)In: Omvårdnad & kirurgi / [ed] Christine Kumlien & Jenny Rystedt, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2016, 1, p. 57-74Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2016 Edition: 1
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-71913 (URN)9789144088860 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-03-28 Created: 2018-03-28 Last updated: 2018-04-09Bibliographically approved
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