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Berggren, H., Nordahl, O., Yildirim, Y., Larsson, P., Tibblin, P. & Forsman, A. (2023). Effects of environmental translocation and host characteristics on skin microbiomes of sun-basking fish. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, 290(2013), Article ID 20231608.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of environmental translocation and host characteristics on skin microbiomes of sun-basking fish
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2023 (English)In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 290, no 2013, article id 20231608Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Variation in the composition of skin-associated microbiomes has been attributed to host species, geographical location and habitat, but the role of intraspecific phenotypic variation among host individuals remains elusive. We explored if and how host environment and different phenotypic traits were associated with microbiome composition. We conducted repeated sampling of dorsal and ventral skin microbiomes of carp individuals (Cyprinus carpio) before and after translocation from laboratory conditions to a semi-natural environment. Both alpha and beta diversity of skin-associated microbiomes increased substantially within and among individuals following translocation, particularly on dorsal body sites. The variation in microbiome composition among hosts was significantly associated with body site, sun-basking, habitat switch and growth, but not temperature gain while basking, sex, personality nor colour morph. We suggest that the overall increase in the alpha and beta diversity estimates among hosts were induced by individuals expressing greater variation in behaviours and thus exposure to potential colonizers in the pond environment compared with the laboratory. Our results exemplify how biological diversity at one level of organization (phenotypic variation among and within fish host individuals) together with the external environment impacts biological diversity at a higher hierarchical level of organization (richness and composition of fish-associated microbial communities).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society, 2023
Keywords
freshwater, biodiversity, microbiota, skin microbiome, teleost, 16S amplicons
National Category
Ecology Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-126932 (URN)10.1098/rspb.2023.1608 (DOI)001130342600003 ()38113936 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85180809066 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-01-19 Created: 2024-01-19 Last updated: 2024-02-22Bibliographically approved
Tibblin, P., Bergström, K., Flink, H., Hall, M., Berggren, H., Nordahl, O. & Larsson, P. (2023). Higher abundance of adult pike in Baltic Sea coastal areas adjacent to restored wetlands compared to reference bays. Hydrobiologia, 850, 2049-2060
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Higher abundance of adult pike in Baltic Sea coastal areas adjacent to restored wetlands compared to reference bays
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2023 (English)In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 850, p. 2049-2060Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The abundance of pike, a keystone top-predator, have declined dramatically in the Baltic Sea since the 1990s likely owing to recruitment failure. It has been proposed that wetland restoration can aid the recovery of the pike stock by increasing the number of recruits produced by anadromous populations. Yet, no previous studies have addressed whether wetland restorations are associated with higher abundances of adult pike in the coastal habitat. To address this, we performed standardised rod-and-reel survey fishing in paired bays with and without wetlands across three coastal areas and 3 years. To estimate dispersal and the contribution of wetland pike to the coastal stock, we tagged captured pike with passive integrated responders (PIT) and employed PIT reader stations in wetland inlets. The results showed that pike abundances were on average 90% higher in bays with an adjacent wetland although the effect varied among areas. Moreover, PIT-data uncovered that wetland pike constituted a high proportion of the pike found in adjacent coastal habitats and that some wetland fish dispersed up to 10 km. These results support that wetland restoration is a valuable tool to aid the coastal pike stock and ultimately restore the function and services of the coastal ecosystem.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Conservation, Fish, Habitat restoration, Management, Spawning, Standardized rod-and-reel fishing
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-121480 (URN)10.1007/s10750-023-05216-4 (DOI)000971781400002 ()2-s2.0-85153063928 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-06-08 Created: 2023-06-08 Last updated: 2023-09-07Bibliographically approved
Hall, M., Nordahl, O., Forsman, A. & Tibblin, P. (2023). Maternal size in perch (Perca fluviatilis) influences the capacity of offspring to cope with different temperatures. Frontiers in Marine Science, 10, Article ID 1175176.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maternal size in perch (Perca fluviatilis) influences the capacity of offspring to cope with different temperatures
2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 10, article id 1175176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change causes earlier and warmer springs in seasonal environments and a higher incidence of extreme weather events. In aquatic environments, this changes the thermal conditions during spawning, and the thermal performance of eggs and embryos may determine the consequences of climate change on recruitment. In iteroparous species with indeterminate growth, the eggs produced by a given female in successive years will increase in size as the female grows larger and likely be exposed to different temperatures during incubation due to annual variation in spring phenology. Still, we know little about whether differences in maternal size impact the temperature-dependent performance and viability of the offspring. Here we utilised a thermal gradient laboratory experiment on Baltic Sea perch (Perca fluviatilis) to investigate how maternal size influence the temperature dependent hatching success of the offspring. The results uncovered a positive relationship between maternal size and average hatching success, but the shape of the relationship (reaction norm) linking hatching success to incubation temperature was independent of maternal size. However, we did find an association between maternal size and the variance (S.D. and CV) in hatching success across temperatures, with larger females producing offspring with maintained performance (less sensitive) across temperature treatments, indicative of flatter reaction norms and broader thermal niches. This suggests that maintaining the size distribution of fish populations, for instance through regulations of size-selective fisheries, may be important to aid the long-term productivity and viability of fish populations and ultimately conserve the function and services of ecosystems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
Keywords
Baltic Sea, climate change, hatching, fish, global warming, reproduction, spawning, thermal tolerance
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-123587 (URN)10.3389/fmars.2023.1175176 (DOI)001026675800001 ()2-s2.0-85165047323 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-10 Created: 2023-08-10 Last updated: 2024-02-13Bibliographically approved
Münnich, J., Hoppmann, F., Berggren, H., Nordahl, O. & Tibblin, P. (2023). The role of chemical communication in the predator-prey role reversal of northern pike (Esox lucius) and three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Fisheries Research, 258, Article ID 106537.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of chemical communication in the predator-prey role reversal of northern pike (Esox lucius) and three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus)
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2023 (English)In: Fisheries Research, ISSN 0165-7836, E-ISSN 1872-6763, Vol. 258, article id 106537Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Predator-prey interactions can modify population dynamics and influence ecosystem functioning. An interesting, but less understood, aspect of such species interactions is predator-prey role reversal where a mesopredator can reduce the recruitment success, and ultimately the abundance, of their own predator. Such role reversal is ongoing in the Baltic Sea where increasing abundances of mesopredatory sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) have resulted in intense predation on the recruits of their predator the northern pike (Esox lucius). Still, the mechanistic underpinning of this reversal remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the role of chemical communication in this predator-prey role reversal with the aim to understand whether and how sticklebacks use olfactory cues to assess whether pike constitutes a predator or prey. By performing a laboratory preference experiment, we show that chemical communication is indeed used by sticklebacks for assessing the predation risk emanated by adult pike but that it requires additional alarm cues (Schreckstoff) informing that sticklebacks are predated upon. Adult pike kairomones or alarm cues alone did not result in any adaptive response by sticklebacks nor did olfactory cues of pike as prey (pike larvae kairomones and dietary cues of zooplankton). This knowledge contributes to the understanding of predator-prey interactions as well as the dynamics of the shifting coastal fish community in the Baltic Sea. The results also suggest that addition of Schreckstoff to confined pike (and perch) spawning and recruitment habitats may deter sticklebacks from entering which should be further explored by management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Behavior, Coastal, Olfaction, Predator -prey interactions
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-118370 (URN)10.1016/j.fishres.2022.106537 (DOI)000895506500003 ()2-s2.0-85141257654 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-01-16 Created: 2023-01-16 Last updated: 2023-02-21Bibliographically approved
Todisco, V., Fridolfsson, E., Axen, C., Dahlgren, E., Ejsmond, M. J., Hauber, M. M., . . . Hylander, S. (2023). Thiamin dynamics during the adult life cycle of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Journal of Fish Biology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thiamin dynamics during the adult life cycle of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Thiamin is an essential water-soluble B vitamin known for its wide range of metabolic functions and antioxidant properties. Over the past decades, reproductive failures induced by thiamin deficiency have been observed in several salmonid species worldwide, but it is unclear why this micronutrient deficiency arises. Few studies have compared thiamin concentrations in systems of salmonid populations with or without documented thiamin deficiency. Moreover, it is not well known whether and how thiamin concentration changes during the marine feeding phase and the spawning migration. Therefore, samples of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) were collected when actively feeding in the open Baltic Sea, after the sea migration to natal rivers, after river migration, and during the spawning period. To compare populations of Baltic salmon with systems without documented thiamin deficiency, a population of landlocked salmon located in Lake Vanern (Sweden) was sampled as well as salmon from Norwegian rivers draining into the North Atlantic Ocean. Results showed the highest mean thiamin concentrations in Lake Vanern salmon, followed by North Atlantic, and the lowest in Baltic populations. Therefore, salmon in the Baltic Sea seem to be consistently more constrained by thiamin than those in other systems. Condition factor and body length had little to no effect on thiamin concentrations in all systems, suggesting that there is no relation between the body condition of salmon and thiamin deficiency. In our large spatiotemporal comparison of salmon populations, thiamin concentrations declined toward spawning in all studied systems, suggesting that the reduction in thiamin concentration arises as a natural consequence of starvation rather than to be related to thiamin deficiency in the system. These results suggest that factors affecting accumulation during the marine feeding phase are key for understanding the thiamin deficiency in salmonids.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
Atlantic salmon, Baltic Sea, M74 syndrome, Salmon life cycle, Thiamin, Thiamin deficiency
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-126410 (URN)10.1111/jfb.15584 (DOI)001115190600001 ()37823583 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85178887480 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-01-11 Created: 2024-01-11 Last updated: 2024-01-11
Flink, H., Tibblin, P., Hall, M., Hellström, G. & Nordahl, O. (2023). Variation among bays in spatiotemporal aggregation of Baltic Sea pike highlights management complexity. Fisheries Research, 259, Article ID 106579.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Variation among bays in spatiotemporal aggregation of Baltic Sea pike highlights management complexity
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2023 (English)In: Fisheries Research, ISSN 0165-7836, E-ISSN 1872-6763, Vol. 259, article id 106579Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding the movement ecology of fish communities is necessary to take effective management actions that aim to reverse population declines, especially in fish stocks containing sympatric subpopulations with local adaptations, such as Northern pike (Esox lucius) in the Baltic Sea. We followed the movement and survival of adult pike for one year by tagging 198 individuals in an estuary (an anadromous subpopulation) as well as in two neighbouring bays (individuals of unknown origin) with acoustic transmitters. We found that the estuary was vital in sustaining the local coastal pike stock, that anadromous pike mainly inhabited a coastal area with a radius of 3 km and aggregated in large numbers in the estuary several months prior to spawning. Management should thus prioritise to identify, restore, and protect estuaries from exploitation. The two neighbouring bays demonstrated distinct differences in spatiotemporal aggregations of pike with no aggregations prior to, and during, spawning in the bay without estuaries. The habitat choice during spawning season suggests that 92% of pike sampled in the bay adjacent to the estuary belong to the anadromous subpopulation, while 94% of pike sampled in the neighbouring bay belong to unknown subpopulation(s) of resident brackish spawners. Survival of tagged pike was 84% and suggest low mortality from fisheries and top predators, which have been proposed as threats to pike populations in other areas of the Baltic Sea. Together, these results call for management of high resolution and highlight the importance of detailed movement data.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Movement ecology, Ecosystem-based management, Fisheries, Protected areas, Habitat restoration, Acoustic telemetry
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-117821 (URN)10.1016/j.fishres.2022.106579 (DOI)000914579000011 ()2-s2.0-85145564092 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-12-08 Created: 2022-12-08 Last updated: 2023-03-16Bibliographically approved
Sunde, J., Yildirim, Y., Tibblin, P., Bekkevold, D., Skov, C., Nordahl, O., . . . Forsman, A. (2022). Drivers of neutral and adaptive differentiation in pike (Esox lucius) populations from contrasting environments. Molecular Ecology, 31(4), 1093-1110
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Drivers of neutral and adaptive differentiation in pike (Esox lucius) populations from contrasting environments
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2022 (English)In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 1093-1110Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding how eco-evolutionary processes and environmental factors drive population differentiation and adaptation are key challenges in evolutionary biology of relevance for biodiversity protection. Differentiation requires at least partial reproductive separation, which may result from different modes of isolation such as geographic isolation (allopatry) or isolation by distance (IBD), resistance (IBR), and environment (IBE). Despite that multiple modes might jointly influence differentiation, studies that compare the relative contributions are scarce. Using RADseq, we analyse neutral and adaptive genetic diversity and structure in 11 pike (Esox lucius) populations from contrasting environments along a latitudinal gradient (54.9-63.6 degrees N), to investigate the relative effects of IBD, IBE and IBR, and to assess whether the effects differ between neutral and adaptive variation, or across structural levels. Patterns of neutral and adaptive variation differed, probably reflecting that they have been differently affected by stochastic and deterministic processes. The importance of the different modes of isolation differed between neutral and adaptive diversity, yet were consistent across structural levels. Neutral variation was influenced by interactions among all three modes of isolation, with IBR (seascape features) playing a central role, wheares adaptive variation was mainly influenced by IBE (environmental conditions). Taken together, this and previous studies suggest that it is common that multiple modes of isolation interactively shape patterns of genetic variation, and that their relative contributions differ among systems. To enable identification of general patterns and understand how various factors influence the relative contributions, it is important that several modes are simultaneously investigated in additional populations, species and environmental settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
Keywords
adaptation, Esox lucius, genetic differentiation, outlier loci, pike, population structure, RADseq, selection
National Category
Ecology Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Ecology, Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-109463 (URN)10.1111/mec.16315 (DOI)000730288400001 ()34874594 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85121334285 (Scopus ID)2021 (Local ID)2021 (Archive number)2021 (OAI)
Available from: 2022-01-18 Created: 2022-01-18 Last updated: 2023-02-17Bibliographically approved
Tamario, C., Tibblin, P. & Degerman, E. (2022). Ecological marginality and recruitment loss in the globally endangered freshwater pearl mussel. Journal of Biogeography, 49(10), 1793-1804
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ecological marginality and recruitment loss in the globally endangered freshwater pearl mussel
2022 (English)In: Journal of Biogeography, ISSN 0305-0270, E-ISSN 1365-2699, Vol. 49, no 10, p. 1793-1804Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim Ecological marginality is the existence of species/populations in the margins of their ecological niche, where conditions are harsher, and the risk of extinction is more pronounced. In threatened long-lived species, the disparity between distribution and population demography may provide understanding of how environmental heterogeneity shapes ecological marginality, potential extinction patterns and range shifts. We set out to evaluate this by combining a species distribution model (SDM) with population-specific demography data. Location Sweden, 450,000 km(2). Major Taxa Studied Freshwater pearl mussel (FPM, Margaritifera margaritifera) and two salmonid fish species. Methods A SDM for the mussel was constructed with MaxEnt using salmonid host fish (Salmo trutta plus S. salar) density, extreme low and high temperatures, precipitation, altitude, and clay content as explanatory variables. The output was used to test the ecological marginality hypothesis by evaluating whether lowly predicted populations had higher loss of recruitment. Logistic regression was used to explicitly test the factors involved in recruitment loss. Results Host fish density contributed the most (50.3%) to the mussel distribution, followed by lowest temperature the coldest month (34.3%) and altitude (10.3%), while the remaining explanatory variables contributed minimally (<3.3%). Populations with lower SDM scores lacked recruitment to a significantly higher degree. Populations inhabiting areas at low altitude, with lower densities of host fish, and warmer winter temperatures have lost recruitment to a higher degree. Main Conclusions We found support for the ecological marginality hypothesis. The patterns indicate that FPM habitat niche may shift northwards over time. Salmonid host fish density seems to be a driving factor for both historical distribution and recent demographic performance. Finally, we emphasize the value of combining SDMs with independent data on population demography as it both lends rigidity to model validation and understanding of how ecological marginality affects species distribution and viability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
Keywords
demography, edge, extinction vortex, population, range shifts, species distribution
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-116364 (URN)10.1111/jbi.14473 (DOI)000842626000001 ()2-s2.0-85136495334 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-09-20 Created: 2022-09-20 Last updated: 2023-08-30Bibliographically approved
Bergström, K., Nordahl, O., Söderling, P., Koch-Schmidt, P., Borger, T., Tibblin, P. & Larsson, P. (2022). Exceptional longevity in northern peripheral populations of Wels catfish (Siluris glanis). Scientific Reports, 12(1), Article ID 8070.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exceptional longevity in northern peripheral populations of Wels catfish (Siluris glanis)
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2022 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 8070Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Studies of life-history variation across a species range are crucial for ecological understanding and successful conservation. Here, we examined the growth and age of Wels catfish (Silurus glanis) in Sweden, which represent the northernmost populations in Europe. A total of 1183 individuals were captured, marked and released between 2006 and 2020. Mark-recapture data from 162 individuals (size range: 13-195 cm) were used to estimate von Bertalanffy growth curve parameters which revealed very slow growth rates compared to catfish within the core distribution area (central Europe). The fitted von Bertalanffy growth curve predicted a 150 cm catfish to be around 40 years old, while the largest recaptured individual (length 195 cm) was estimated to be 70 (95% CI 50-112) years old. This was substantially older than the previously documented maximum age of a catfish. The weight at length relationships in these northern peripheral populations were similar to those documented for catfish in central Europe indicating that resources did not constrain growth. This indicates that the slow growth and exceptional high age in the northern catfish populations are the result of lower temperatures and/or local adaptations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2022
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-114322 (URN)10.1038/s41598-022-12165-w (DOI)000796701700022 ()35577886 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85130182143 (Scopus ID)
Note

Correction published in: Bergström, K., Nordahl, O., Söderling, P. et al. Author Correction: Exceptional longevity in northern peripheral populations of Wels catfish (Siluris glanis). Sci Rep 12, 9812 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-14484-4

Available from: 2022-06-17 Created: 2022-06-17 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Berggren, H., Tibblin, P., Yildirim, Y., Broman, E., Larsson, P., Lundin, D. & Forsman, A. (2022). Fish Skin Microbiomes Are Highly Variable Among Individuals and Populations but Not Within Individuals. Frontiers in Microbiology, 12, Article ID 767770.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fish Skin Microbiomes Are Highly Variable Among Individuals and Populations but Not Within Individuals
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2022 (English)In: Frontiers in Microbiology, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 12, article id 767770Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fish skin-associated microbial communities are highly variable among populations and species and can impact host fitness. Still, the sources of variation in microbiome composition, and particularly how they vary among and within host individuals, have rarely been investigated. To tackle this issue, we explored patterns of variation in fish skin microbiomes across different spatial scales. We conducted replicate sampling of dorsal and ventral body sites of perch (Perca fluviatilis) from two populations and characterized the variation of fish skin-associated microbial communities with 16S rRNA gene metabarcoding. Results showed a high similarity of microbiome samples taken from the left and right side of the same fish individuals, suggesting that fish skin microbiomes can be reliably assessed and characterized even using a single sample from a specific body site. The microbiome composition of fish skin differed markedly from the bacterioplankton communities in the surrounding water and was highly variable among individuals. No ASV was present in all samples, and the most prevalent phyla, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria, varied in relative abundance among fish hosts. Microbiome composition was both individual- and population specific, with most of the variation explained by individual host. At the individual level, we found no diversification in microbiome composition between dorsal and ventral body sites, but the degree of intra-individual heterogeneity varied among individuals. To identify how genetic and phenotypic characteristics of fish hosts impact the rate and nature of intra-individual temporal dynamics of the skin microbiome, and thereby contribute to the host-specific patterns documented here, remains an important task for future research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2022
Keywords
community ecology, diversity, fish, heterogeneity, repeatability, richness, skin microbiota, spatial variation
National Category
Microbiology Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-110468 (URN)10.3389/fmicb.2021.767770 (DOI)000751451900001 ()35126324 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85124103536 (Scopus ID)2022 (Local ID)2022 (Archive number)2022 (OAI)
Available from: 2022-02-17 Created: 2022-02-17 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6804-5342

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