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Jonsson, Nina
Publications (10 of 21) Show all publications
Huang, S., Engberg, A. E., Jonsson, N., Sandholm, K., Nicholls, I. A., Mollnes, T. E., . . . Nilsson Ekdahl, K. (2016). Reciprocal relationship between contact and complement system activation on artificial polymers exposed to whole human blood.. Biomaterials, 77, 111-119
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reciprocal relationship between contact and complement system activation on artificial polymers exposed to whole human blood.
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2016 (English)In: Biomaterials, ISSN 0142-9612, E-ISSN 1878-5905, Vol. 77, p. 111-119Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Inappropriate and uncontrolled activation of the cascade systems in the blood is a driving force in adverse inflammatory and thrombotic reactions elicited by biomaterials, but limited data are available on the activation of the contact system by polymers and the present study was undertaken to investigate these mechanisms in established models.

METHODS: Polymer particles were incubated in (1) EDTA-plasma (10 mM) to monitor the adsorption of 20 selected proteins; (2) lepirudin-anticoagulated plasma to evaluate contact system activation, monitored by the formation of complexes between the generated proteases factor[F]XIIa, FXIa and kallikrein and the serpins C1-inhibitor [C1INH] and antithrombin [AT]; (3) lepirudin-anticoagulated whole blood to determine cytokine release.

RESULTS: Strong negative correlations were found between 10 cytokines and the ratio of deposited FXII/C1INH, generated FXIIa-C1INH complexes, and kallikrein-C1INH complexes. Formation of FXIIa-C1INH complexes correlated negatively with the amount of C3a and positively with deposited IgG.

CONCLUSIONS: A reciprocal relationship was found between activation of the contact system and the complement system induced by the polymers studied here. The ratios of FXII/C1INH or C4/C4BP, adsorbed from EDTA-plasma are useful surrogate markers for cytokine release and inflammatory response to materials intended for blood contact.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Biomaterials, Complement system, Contact system, FXII, In vitro screening
National Category
Biomaterials Science
Research subject
Chemistry, Biochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-47390 (URN)10.1016/j.biomaterials.2015.10.067 (DOI)000367118200010 ()26584351 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84949221849 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-11-24 Created: 2015-11-24 Last updated: 2022-06-07Bibliographically approved
Asif, S., Jonsson, N., Teramura, Y., Gustafson, E., Nilsson Ekdahl, K. & Nilsson, B. (2015). Conjugation of human recombinant CD39 to primary human hepatocytes protects against thromboinflammation. Paper presented at IPITA/IXA/CTS Joint Congress, NOV 15-19, 2015, Melbourne, AUSTRALIA. Xenotransplantation, 22, S87-S87
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conjugation of human recombinant CD39 to primary human hepatocytes protects against thromboinflammation
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2015 (English)In: Xenotransplantation, ISSN 0908-665X, E-ISSN 1399-3089, Vol. 22, p. S87-S87Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Natural Science, Biomedical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-48301 (URN)000364594100203 ()
Conference
IPITA/IXA/CTS Joint Congress, NOV 15-19, 2015, Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Note

Also published in Transplantation (2015) vol 99, Supplement 11S-2, Abstract 561.

Available from: 2015-12-11 Created: 2015-12-11 Last updated: 2022-03-16Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, N., Sävneby, A., Gullberg, M., Evertsson, K., Klingel, K. & Lindberg, A. M. (2015). Efficient replication of recombinant Enterovirus B types, carrying different P1 genes in the coxsackievirus B5 replicative backbone. Virus genes, 50(3), 351-357
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Efficient replication of recombinant Enterovirus B types, carrying different P1 genes in the coxsackievirus B5 replicative backbone
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2015 (English)In: Virus genes, ISSN 0920-8569, E-ISSN 1572-994X, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 351-357Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recombination is an important feature in theevolution of the Enterovirus genus. Phylogenetic studies ofenteroviruses have revealed that the capsid genomic region(P1) is type specific, while the parts of the genome codingfor the non-structural proteins (P2–P3) are species specific.Hence, the genome may be regarded as consisting of twomodules that evolve independently. In this study, it wasinvestigated whether the non-structural coding part of thegenome in one type could support replication of a virus witha P1 region from another type of the same species. A cas-sette vector (pCas) containing a full-length cDNA copy ofcoxsackievirus B5 (CVB5) was used as a replicative back-bone. The P1 region of pCas was replaced with the corre-sponding part from coxsackievirus B3Nancy(CVB3N),coxsackievirus B6Schmitt(CVB6S), and echovirus 7Wal-lace(E7W), all members of theEnterovirus Bspecies. Thereplication efficiency after transfection with clone-derivedin vitro transcribed RNA was studied and compared withthat of pCas. All the recombinant viruses replicated with similar efficiencies and showed threshold cycle (Ct) values,tissue culture infectivity dose 50 %, and plaque-forming unittiters comparable to viruses generated from the pCas con-struct. In addition to this, a clone without the P1 region wasalso constructed, and Western Blot and immunofluorescencestaining analysis showed that the viral genome could betranslated and replicated despite the lack of the structuralprotein-coding region. To conclude, the replicative back-bone of the CVB5 cassette vector supports replication ofintraspecies constructs with P1 regions derived from othermembers of theEnterovirus Bspecies. In addition to this,the replicative backbone can be both translated and repli-cated without the presence of a P1 region.

National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Biomedical Sciences, Virology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-41538 (URN)10.1007/s11262-015-1177-x (DOI)000355233000001 ()25663145 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84929956418 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-04-01 Created: 2015-04-01 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Huang, S., Sandholm, K., Jonsson, N., Nilsson, A., Wieslander, A., Grundström, G., . . . Nilsson Ekdahl, K. (2015). Low concentrations of citrate reduce complement and granulocyte activation in vitro in human blood. Clinical Kidney Journal, 8(1), 31-37
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Low concentrations of citrate reduce complement and granulocyte activation in vitro in human blood
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2015 (English)In: Clinical Kidney Journal, ISSN 2048-8505, E-ISSN 2048-8513, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 31-37Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:The use of acetate in haemodialysis fluids may induce negative effects in patients including nausea and increased inflammation. Therefore, haemodialysis fluids where acetate is substituted with citrate have recently been developed. In this study, we investigated the biocompatibility of citrate employing concentrations used in haemodialysis.

METHODS:The effects of citrate and acetate were investigated in human whole blood in vitro under conditions promoting biomaterial-induced activation. Complement activation was measured as generation of C3a, C5a and the sC5b-9 complex, and granulocyte activation as up-regulation of CD11b expression. For the experimental set-up, a mathematical model was created to calculate the concentrations of acetate and citrate attained during haemodialysis.

RESULTS:Citrate reduced granulocyte activation and did not induce higher complement activation compared with acetate at concentrations attained during haemodialysis. Investigating different citrate concentrations clearly showed that citrate is a potent complement inhibitor already at low concentrations, i.e. 0.25 mM, which is comparable with concentrations detected in the blood of patients during dialysis with citrate-containing fluids. Increased citrate concentration up to 6 mM further reduced the activation of C3a, C5a and sC5b-9, as well as the expression of CD11b.

CONCLUSIONS:Our results suggest that citrate is a promising substitute for acetate for a more biocompatible dialysis, most likely resulting in less adverse effects for the patients.

National Category
Immunology in the medical area Urology and Nephrology
Research subject
Natural Science, Biomedical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-40430 (URN)10.1093/ckj/sfu127 (DOI)25713707 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84928381906 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-02-25 Created: 2015-02-25 Last updated: 2022-06-07Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, N., Asif, S., Teramura, Y., Gustafson, E., Nilsson Ekdahl, K. & Nilsson, B. (2015). Surface modification of primary human hepatocytes with recombinant CD39 protects against thromboinfiammation. Paper presented at 15th European Meeting on Complement in Human Disease (EMCHD), JUN 27-30, 2015, Uppsala, SWEDEN. Molecular Immunology, 67(1), 149-150
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Surface modification of primary human hepatocytes with recombinant CD39 protects against thromboinfiammation
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2015 (English)In: Molecular Immunology, ISSN 0161-5890, E-ISSN 1872-9142, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 149-150Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Immunology
Research subject
Biomedical Sciences, Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-45775 (URN)000357144100102 ()
Conference
15th European Meeting on Complement in Human Disease (EMCHD), JUN 27-30, 2015, Uppsala, SWEDEN
Available from: 2015-08-20 Created: 2015-08-19 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved
Nilsson Ekdahl, K., Teramura, Y., Asif, S., Jonsson, N., Magnusson, P. & Nilsson, B. (2015). Thromboinflammation in therapeutic medicine. Paper presented at 1st International Conference on Immune Response to Biosurfaces, Chania, GREECE, SEP 27-OCT 02, 2014. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, 865, 3-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thromboinflammation in therapeutic medicine
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2015 (English)In: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0065-2598, Vol. 865, p. 3-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Thromboinflammation is primarily triggered by the humoral innate immune system, which mainly consists of the cascade systems of the blood, i.e., the complement, contact/coagulation and fibrinolytic systems. Activation of these systems subsequently induces activation of endothelial cells, leukocytes and platelets, finally resulting in thrombotic and inflammatory reactions. Such reactions are triggered by a number of medical procedures, e.g., treatment with biomaterials or drug delivery devices as well as in transplantation with cells, cell clusters or whole vascularized organs. Here, we (1) describe basic mechanisms for thromboinflammation; (2) review thromboinflammatory reactions in therapeutic medicine; and (3) discuss emerging strategies to dampen thromboinflammation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2015
National Category
Immunology
Research subject
Biomedical Sciences, Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-40421 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-18603-0_1 (DOI)000361838300002 ()26306440 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84940366281 (Scopus ID)978-3-319-18602-3 (ISBN)978-3-319-18603-0 (ISBN)
Conference
1st International Conference on Immune Response to Biosurfaces, Chania, GREECE, SEP 27-OCT 02, 2014
Available from: 2015-02-25 Created: 2015-02-25 Last updated: 2022-07-15Bibliographically approved
Sandholm, K., Henningsson, A. J., Säve, S., Bergström, S., Forsberg, P., Jonsson, N., . . . Nilsson Ekdahl, K. (2014). Early Cytokine Release in Response to Live Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato Spirochetes Is Largely Complement Independent. PLOS ONE, 9(9), e108013
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early Cytokine Release in Response to Live Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato Spirochetes Is Largely Complement Independent
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2014 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 9, p. e108013-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: Here we investigated the role of complement activation in phagocytosis and the release of cytokines and chemokines in response to two clinical isolates: Borrelia afzelii K78, which is resistant to complement-mediated lysis, and Borrelia garinii LU59, which is complement-sensitive. Methods: Borrelia spirochetes were incubated in hirudin plasma, or hirudin-anticoagulated whole blood. Complement activation was measured as the generation of C3a and sC5b-9. Binding of the complement components C3, factor H, C4, and C4BP to the bacterial surfaces was analyzed. The importance of complement activation on phagocytosis, and on the release of cytokines and chemokines, was investigated using inhibitors acting at different levels of the complement cascade. Results: 1) Borrelia garinii LU59 induced significantly higher complement activation than did Borrelia afzelii K78. 2) Borrelia afzelii K78 recruited higher amounts of factor H resulting in significantly lower C3 binding. 3) Both Borrelia strains were efficiently phagocytized by granulocytes and monocytes, with substantial inhibition by complement blockade at the levels of C3 and C5. 4) The release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines IL-1 beta, IL-6, TNF, CCL20, and CXCL8, together with the anti-inflammatory IL-10, were increased the most (by>10-fold after exposure to Borrelia). 5) Both strains induced a similar release of cytokines and chemokines, which in contrast to the phagocytosis, was almost totally unaffected by complement blockade. Conclusions: Our results show that complement activation plays an important role in the process of phagocytosis but not in the subsequent cytokine release in response to live Borrelia spirochetes.

National Category
Immunology
Research subject
Biomedical Sciences, Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-39138 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0108013 (DOI)000345745400038 ()2-s2.0-84907482271 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-01-15 Created: 2015-01-15 Last updated: 2021-06-14Bibliographically approved
Israelsson, S., Sävneby, A., Ekström, J.-O., Jonsson, N., Edman, K. & Lindberg, A. M. (2014). Improved replication efficiency of echovirus 5 after transfection of colon cancer cells using an authentic 5' RNA genome end methodology. Investigational new drugs, 32(6), 1063-1070
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improved replication efficiency of echovirus 5 after transfection of colon cancer cells using an authentic 5' RNA genome end methodology
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2014 (English)In: Investigational new drugs, ISSN 0167-6997, E-ISSN 1573-0646, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 1063-1070Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Oncolytic virotherapy is a promising novel form of cancer treatment, but the therapeutic efficiency needs improvement. A potential strategy to enhance the therapeutic effect of oncolytic viruses is to use infectious nucleic acid as therapeutic agent to initiate an oncolytic infection, without administrating infectious viral particles. Here we demonstrate improved viral replication activation efficiency when transfecting cells with 5’ end authentic in vitro transcribed enterovirus RNA as compared to genomic RNA with additional non-genomic 5’ nucleotides generated by conventional cloning methods. We used echovirus 5 (E5) as an oncolytoc model virus due to its ability to replicate in and completely destroy five out of six colon cancer cell lines and kill artificial colon cancer tumors (HT29 spheroids), as shown here. An E5 infectious cDNA clone including a hammerhead ribozyme sequence was used to generate in vitro transcripts with native 5’ genome ends. In HT29 cells, activation of virus replication is approximately 20-fold more efficient for virus genome transcripts with native 5’ genome ends compared to E5 transcripts generated from a standard cDNA clone. This replication advantage remains when viral progeny release starts by cellular lysis 22 h post transfection. Hence, a native 5’ genomic end improves infection activation efficacy of infectious nucleic acid, potentially enhancing its therapeutic effect when used for cancer treatment. The clone design with a hammerhead ribozyme is likely to be applicable to a variety of oncolytic positive sense RNA viruses for the purpose of improving the efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy.

Keywords
Picornavirus, RNA virus, Enterovirus, Oncolytic virotherapy, Hammerhead ribozyme, Infectious nucleic acid
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Biomedical Sciences, Virology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-41541 (URN)10.1007/s10637-014-0136-z (DOI)000345142300002 ()2-s2.0-84938677294 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-04-01 Created: 2015-04-01 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, N., Wahlström, K., Svensson, L., Serrander, L. & Lindberg, A. M. (2012). Aichi virus infection in elderly people in Sweden.. Archives of Virology, 157(7), 1365-1369
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aichi virus infection in elderly people in Sweden.
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2012 (English)In: Archives of Virology, ISSN 0304-8608, E-ISSN 1432-8798, Vol. 157, no 7, p. 1365-1369Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aichi virus (AiV), genus Kobuvirus, family Picornaviridae, is associated with gastroenteritis in humans. Previous studies have shown high seroprevalence but low incidence (0.9-4.1%) in clinical samples. We report here the first detection of AiV in Sweden. Two hundred twenty-one specimens from hospitalized patients with diarrhea, who were negative for other enteric viruses, were included in the study. AiV were detected in three specimens, all from elderly patients. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the three Swedish isolates belonged to genotype A and were genetically closest to European and Asian strains of AiV.

National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Biomedical Sciences, Virology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-22833 (URN)10.1007/s00705-012-1296-9 (DOI)000305795300017 ()22466255 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84863086885 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-12-14 Created: 2012-12-12 Last updated: 2022-02-14Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, N. (2012). Development of novel methods for studying Picornaviruses. (Doctoral dissertation). Linnaeus University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of novel methods for studying Picornaviruses
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linnaeus University Press, 2012. p. 66
Series
Linnaeus University Dissertations ; 86
National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Biomedical Sciences, Virology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-110352 (URN)9789186983598 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-05-31, N2007, Smålandsgatan 26, Kalmar, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2022-02-14 Created: 2022-02-14 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
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