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Bhambra, Gurminder K.ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3658-1575
Publications (8 of 8) Show all publications
Bhambra, G. K. (2018). The state: Postcolonial histories of the concept. In: Olivia U. Rutazibwa, Robbie Shilliam (Ed.), Routledge Handbook of Postcolonial Politics: (pp. 200-209). Abingdon-on-Thames: Taylor & Francis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The state: Postcolonial histories of the concept
2018 (English)In: Routledge Handbook of Postcolonial Politics / [ed] Olivia U. Rutazibwa, Robbie Shilliam, Abingdon-on-Thames: Taylor & Francis, 2018, p. 200-209Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Our contemporary political landscape is organised around the idea of the nation-state and, as Habermas (1998) (among many others) has argued, this idea is seen to have its origins in the system of sovereign states that came into being in Europe in 1648 with the Treaty of Westphalia. The history of the modern nation-state is then understood to be further shaped by the American and French Revolutions in the late eighteenth century. Within Europe, there are seen to be two routes to modern statehood. The first was the evolution of nation-states ‘within the boundaries of existing territorial states’ (Habermas 1998: 397), as was the case for most North and Western European states. The second was in establishing a nation and then a state, as exemplified by the projects of Germany and Italy in the late nineteenth century and the subsequent formation of states in Central and Eastern Europe in the twentieth. These initial formations, he continues, were followed in the period of mass decolonisation in the mid- to late-twentieth century by the establishment of ‘postcolonial’ states. A final moment in the history of nation-states is then presented as the secession of states from the Soviet Union in the aftermath of its collapse in the late twentieth century.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon-on-Thames: Taylor & Francis, 2018
National Category
History
Research subject
Humanities, History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-83377 (URN)10.4324/9781315671192-17 (DOI)2-s2.0-85046923092 (Scopus ID)9781317369400 (ISBN)9781138944596 (ISBN)978-1-315-67119-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-05-24 Created: 2019-05-24 Last updated: 2019-05-24Bibliographically approved
Bhambra, G. K. & Santos, B. d. (2017). Introduction: Global Challenges for Sociology. Sociology, 51(1), 3-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction: Global Challenges for Sociology
2017 (English)In: Sociology, ISSN 0038-0385, E-ISSN 1469-8684, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 3-10Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

With the 50th anniversary of the journal, this special issue takes stock of the progress that has been made within sociology to become a more globally oriented discipline and discusses the new challenges for the future that emerge as a consequence. From its inception, classical sociology was primarily concerned with the European origins of processes of modernity that were to become global. There was little discussion of how the global might be understood in terms of structures, processes and social movements not directly identified as European but nonetheless contributing to modernity. The challenge for sociology has been to take into account these other phenomena and to rethink its core categories and concepts in light of newly understood alternative formations of the global and the social movements that bring them about.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
capitalism, colonialism, epistemology, global sociology, methodology, social movements
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Humanities, Cultural Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-64232 (URN)10.1177/0038038516674665 (DOI)000394842400001 ()2-s2.0-85011693210 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-05-23 Created: 2017-05-23 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Bhambra, G. K. (2017). London is the Place for Me: Black Britons, Citizenship and the Politics of Race [Review]. Political quarterly (London. 1930. Print), 88(3), 529-531
Open this publication in new window or tab >>London is the Place for Me: Black Britons, Citizenship and the Politics of Race
2017 (English)In: Political quarterly (London. 1930. Print), ISSN 0032-3179, E-ISSN 1467-923X, Vol. 88, no 3, p. 529-531Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2017
National Category
Cultural Studies
Research subject
Humanities, Cultural Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-67847 (URN)10.1111/1467-923X.12380 (DOI)000407600300027 ()
Available from: 2017-09-07 Created: 2017-09-07 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved
Bhambra, G. K. (2016). Comparative Historical Sociology and the State: Problems of Method. Cultural Sociology, 10(3), 335-351
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparative Historical Sociology and the State: Problems of Method
2016 (English)In: Cultural Sociology, ISSN 1749-9755, E-ISSN 1749-9763, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 335-351Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Historical sociology can be understood both as a specific sub-field of sociology and as providing general conceptual underpinnings of the discipline, to the extent that it provides an understanding of the specificity of the modern state and the perceived emergence of modernity within Europe. The association of modernity with Europe (and with a European history limited to the selfidentified boundaries of the continent) is commonplace and pervasive within the social sciences and humanities. What such an understanding fails to take into consideration, however, are the connections between Europe and the rest of the world that constitute the broader context for the emergence of what is understood to be the modern world and its institutions, such as the state and market. In this article, I suggest that integral to this misunderstanding, and its reproduction over time, is the methodology of comparative historical sociology as represented by ideal types. In contrast, I argue for ‘connected sociologies’ as a more appropriate way to understand our shared past and its continuing impact upon the present. I examine these issues in the context of historical sociological understandings of nation-state formation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2016
Keywords
modern, state, modern state, imperialism, methodology, ideal types, Weber, Germany, postcolonial critique, Europe, European, empire, imperial, colonial, historical sociology
National Category
History
Research subject
Humanities, History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-62031 (URN)10.1177/1749975516639085 (DOI)2-s2.0-84985995702 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-03-31 Created: 2017-03-31 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Bhambra, G. K. (2016). "Our Island Story": The dangerous politics of belonging in austere times. In: Stefan Jonsson, Julia Willén (Ed.), Austere Histories in European Societies: Social Exclusion and the Contest of Colonial Memories (pp. 21-37). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Our Island Story": The dangerous politics of belonging in austere times
2016 (English)In: Austere Histories in European Societies: Social Exclusion and the Contest of Colonial Memories / [ed] Stefan Jonsson, Julia Willén, Routledge, 2016, p. 21-37Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2016
Series
Routledge Advances in Sociology
National Category
Sociology History
Research subject
Humanities, History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-67687 (URN)10.4324/9781315693996 (DOI)000460755300002 ()2-s2.0-85021005006 (Scopus ID)9781315693996 (ISBN)9781138909380 (ISBN)
Note

Conference: International Symposium on Austere Histories - Social Exclusion and the Erasure of Colonial Memory in Contemporary European Societies, Linkoping Univ, Inst Res Migrat, Ethnic & Soc, Linkoping, SWEDEN, NOV 28-29, 2013

Available from: 2017-09-04 Created: 2017-09-04 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved
Bhambra, G. K. (2016). Postcolonial Reflections on Sociology. Sociology, 50(5), 960-966
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Postcolonial Reflections on Sociology
2016 (English)In: Sociology, ISSN 0038-0385, E-ISSN 1469-8684, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 960-966Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This contribution addresses the impact of postcolonial critiques on sociology by drawing parallels with the emergence of feminism and queer theory within the academy. These critiques were facilitated by the expansion of public higher education over the last five decades and the article also addresses the implications of the privatisation and marketisation of the university on the processes of knowledge production.

Keywords
modernity, postcolonial, public university, race
National Category
History Sociology
Research subject
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-58087 (URN)10.1177/0038038516647683 (DOI)000385657500009 ()2-s2.0-84989929746 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-11-11 Created: 2016-11-11 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved
Bhambra, G. K. (2016). Undoing the Epistemic Disavowal of the Haitian Revolution: A Contribution to Global Social Thought. Journal of Intercultural Studies, 37(1), 1-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Undoing the Epistemic Disavowal of the Haitian Revolution: A Contribution to Global Social Thought
2016 (English)In: Journal of Intercultural Studies, ISSN 0725-6868, E-ISSN 1469-9540, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Haitian Revolution is not only one of the most important foundational moments in the emergence of the modern world, but also one of the most neglected within the social scientific literature. In this article, I ask what can be learnt, both from its omission from accounts of events claimed to be of ‘world historical’ significance, and from how social theory would need to be re-thought once we took such events seriously. In particular, I want to examine what is at stake in such rethinking and how we might consider alternative formulations through an approach I call ‘connected sociologies’.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
Keywords
Haitian revolution, epistemology, global sociology, democratic revolutions, coloniality, postcoloniality, modernity
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-62032 (URN)10.1080/07256868.2015.1122578 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-03-31 Created: 2017-03-31 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Bhambra, G. K. (2016). Whither Europe?: Postcolonial versus Neocolonial Cosmopolitanism. Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, 18(2), 187-202
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Whither Europe?: Postcolonial versus Neocolonial Cosmopolitanism
2016 (English)In: Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, ISSN 1369-801X, E-ISSN 1469-929X, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 187-202Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The financial collapse of 2008, and its consequences of recession in the Eurozone and beyond, has exacerbated tensions at the heart of the postwar European project. The politics of austerity has provoked populist and far-right political responses, scapegoating migrants and minorities and increasingly calling the project of integration into question. In this essay I focus on responses by social theorists to the emerging crisis. In particular, I address the contrast between their reaffirmation of ‘European’ cosmopolitanism and their associated criticisms of multiculturalism, which, instead, is posed as a threat. In this way, while they challenge those who wish the dissolution of the European project, they do so at the expense of those seen to be internal ‘others’, whose scapegoating is one aspect of the populist threat to that integration. It is their failure to address the colonial histories of Europe, I argue, that enables them to dismiss so easily its postcolonial and multicultural present. As such, they reproduce features of the populist political debates they otherwise seek to criticize and transcend. A properly cosmopolitan Europe, I suggest, would be one which understood that its historical constitution in colonialism cannot be rendered to the past by denial of that past.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
Keywords
Colonialism, cosmopolitanism, European Union, historiography, multiculturalism, postcolonialism
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-62034 (URN)10.1080/1369801X.2015.1106964 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-03-31 Created: 2017-03-31 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3658-1575

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