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Sunde, Johanna
Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Sunde, J., Larsson, P. & Forsman, A. (2019). Adaptations of early development to local spawning temperature in anadromous populations of pike (Esox lucius). BMC Evolutionary Biology, 19, 1-13, Article ID 148.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adaptations of early development to local spawning temperature in anadromous populations of pike (Esox lucius)
2019 (English)In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1471-2148, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 19, p. 1-13, article id 148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In the wake of climate change many environments will be exposed to increased and more variable temperatures. Knowledge about how species and populations respond to altered temperature regimes is therefore important to improve projections of how ecosystems will be affected by global warming, and to aid management. We conducted a common garden, split-brood temperature gradient (4.5 degrees C, 9.7 degrees C and 12.3 degrees C) experiment to study the effects of temperature in two populations (10 families from each population) of anadromous pike (Esox lucius) that normally experience different temperatures during spawning. Four offspring performance measures (hatching success, day degrees until hatching, fry survival, and fry body length) were compared between populations and among families. Results: Temperature affected all performance measures in a population-specific manner. Low temperature had a positive effect on the Harfjarden population and a negative effect on the Lervik population. Further, the effects of temperature differed among families within populations. Conclusions: The population-specific responses to temperature indicate genetic differentiation in developmental plasticity between populations, and may reflect an adaptation to low temperature during early fry development in Harfjarden, where the stream leading up to the wetland dries out relatively early in the spring, forcing individuals to spawn early. The family-specific responses to temperature treatment indicate presence of genetic variation for developmental plasticity (G x E) within both populations. Protecting between- and within-population genetic variation for developmental plasticity and high temperature-related adaptive potential of early life history traits will be key to long-term viability and persistence in the face of continued climate change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019
Keywords
Adaptation, Climate change, Esox lucius, Pike, Temperature
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-88774 (URN)10.1186/s12862-019-1475-3 (DOI)000476717300001 ()31331267 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-28 Created: 2019-08-28 Last updated: 2019-08-28Bibliographically approved
Tamario, C., Sunde, J., Petersson, E., Tibblin, P. & Forsman, A. (2019). Ecological and Evolutionary Consequences of Environmental Change and Management Actions for Migrating Fish. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, 7, 1-24, Article ID 271.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ecological and Evolutionary Consequences of Environmental Change and Management Actions for Migrating Fish
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2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2296-701X, Vol. 7, p. 1-24, article id 271Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Migration strategies in fishes comprise a rich, ecologically important, and socioeconomically valuable example of biological diversity. The variation and flexibility in migration is evident between and within individuals, populations, and species, and thereby provides a useful model system that continues to inform how ecological and evolutionary processes mold biodiversity and how biological systems respond to environmental heterogeneity and change. Migrating fishes are targeted by commercial and recreational fishing and impact the functioning of aquatic ecosystems. Sadly, many species of migrating fish are under increasing threat by exploitation, pollution, habitat destruction, dispersal barriers, overfishing, and ongoing climate change that brings modified, novel, more variable and extreme conditions and selection regimes. All this calls for protection, sustainable utilization and adaptive management. However, the situation for migrating fishes is complicated further by actions aimed at mitigating the devastating effects of such threats. Changes in river connectivity associated with removal of dispersal barriers such as dams and construction of fishways, together with compensatory breeding, and supplemental stocking can impact on gene flow and selection. How this in turn affects the dynamics, genetic structure, genetic diversity, evolutionary potential, and viability of spawning migrating fish populations remains largely unknown. In this narrative review we describe and discuss patterns, causes, and consequences of variation and flexibility in fish migration that are scientifically interesting and concern key issues within the framework of evolution and maintenance of biological diversity. We showcase how the evolutionary solutions to key questions that define migrating fish-whether or not to migrate, why to migrate, where to migrate, and when to migrate-may depend on individual characteristics and ecological conditions. We explore links between environmental change and migration strategies, and discuss whether and how threats associated with overexploitation, environmental makeovers, and management actions may differently influence vulnerability of individuals, populations, and species depending on the variation and flexibility of their migration strategies. Our goal is to provide a broad overview of knowledge in this emerging area, spur future research, and development of informed management, and ultimately promote sustainable utilization and protection of migrating fish and their ecosystems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
biodiversity, climate change, developmental plasticity, evolution, fish migration, fishway, phenotypic flexibility, spawning migration
National Category
Evolutionary Biology Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Evolutionary Biology; Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-86980 (URN)10.3389/fevo.2019.00271 (DOI)000474916900001 ()
Available from: 2019-07-25 Created: 2019-07-25 Last updated: 2019-07-25Bibliographically approved
Tamario, C., Sunde, J., Petersson, E., Tibblin, P. & Forsman, A. (2019). Ecological and Evolutionary Consequences of Environmental Change and Management Actions for Migrating Fish. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, 7, 1-24, Article ID 271.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ecological and Evolutionary Consequences of Environmental Change and Management Actions for Migrating Fish
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2296-701X, Vol. 7, p. 1-24, article id 271Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Migration strategies in fishes comprise a rich, ecologically important, and socioeconomically valuable example of biological diversity. The variation and flexibility in migration is evident between and within individuals, populations, and species, and thereby provides a useful model system that continues to inform how ecological and evolutionary processes mold biodiversity and how biological systems respond to environmental heterogeneity and change. Migrating fishes are targeted by commercial and recreational fishing and impact the functioning of aquatic ecosystems. Sadly, many species of migrating fish are under increasing threat by exploitation, pollution, habitat destruction, dispersal barriers, overfishing, and ongoing climate change that brings modified, novel, more variable and extreme conditions and selection regimes. All this calls for protection, sustainable utilization and adaptive management. However, the situation for migrating fishes is complicated further by actions aimed at mitigating the devastating effects of such threats. Changes in river connectivity associated with removal of dispersal barriers such as dams and construction of fishways, together with compensatory breeding, and supplemental stocking can impact on gene flow and selection. How this in turn affects the dynamics, genetic structure, genetic diversity, evolutionary potential, and viability of spawning migrating fish populations remains largely unknown. In this narrative review we describe and discuss patterns, causes, and consequences of variation and flexibility in fish migration that are scientifically interesting and concern key issues within the framework of evolution and maintenance of biological diversity. We showcase how the evolutionary solutions to key questions that define migrating fish-whether or not to migrate, why to migrate, where to migrate, and when to migrate-may depend on individual characteristics and ecological conditions. We explore links between environmental change and migration strategies, and discuss whether and how threats associated with overexploitation, environmental makeovers, and management actions may differently influence vulnerability of individuals, populations, and species depending on the variation and flexibility of their migration strategies. Our goal is to provide a broad overview of knowledge in this emerging area, spur future research, and development of informed management, and ultimately promote sustainable utilization and protection of migrating fish and their ecosystems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
biodiversity, climate change, developmental plasticity, evolution, fish migration, fishway, phenotypic flexibility, spawning migration
National Category
Evolutionary Biology Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Evolutionary Biology; Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-88369 (URN)10.3389/fevo.2019.00271 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-08-22 Created: 2019-08-22 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Nordahl, O., Koch-Schmidt, P., Sunde, J., Yildirim, Y., Tibblin, P., Forsman, A. & Larsson, P. (2019). Genetic differentiation between and within ecotypes of pike (Esox lucius) in the Baltic Sea. Aquatic conservation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic differentiation between and within ecotypes of pike (Esox lucius) in the Baltic Sea
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2019 (English)In: Aquatic conservation, ISSN 1052-7613, E-ISSN 1099-0755Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Aquatic systems often lack physical boundaries for gene flow, but ecological and behavioural barriers can form surprisingly fine spatial scale genetic patterns that challenge traditional, large scale management. To detect fine spatial scale structures, understand sources of intraspecific diversity, and design appropriate management plans requires identification of reproductively isolated units. This study reports on genetic differentiation in pike (Esox lucius) within a coastal area stretching 55 km from south to north in the central Baltic Sea. Pike is here an economically and ecologically important top predator that has declined in abundance. However, population structures have mostly been studied on large spatial scales, and without considering the potential for genetic divergence between the sympatric anadromous fresh water and the resident brackish water spawning ecotypes. To this end, 487 individuals from the east coast of Sweden and the island of oland, representing sympatric anadromous and resident spawning individuals, categorized to ecotype based on spawning location or otolith microchemistry, were genotyped for 10 microsatellites and used to test for divergence between ecotypes. Furthermore, divergence between regions (island/mainland), neighbouring spawning locations (n = 13) and isolation by distance within and between regions were evaluated for the anadromous ecotype. The results revealed strong genetic differences between regions, between spawning locations separated by as little as 5 km and the first evidence of genetic differentiation between resident and anadromous ecotypes; despite a high dispersal capacity of pike and a high connectivity within the study area. The signatures of isolation by distance indicated that connectivity among populations differed between regions, probably reflecting availability of spawning habitats. To safeguard against the challenges and uncertainties associated with environmental change, adaptive conservation management should aim to promote high intra-population functional genetic diversity without compromising the continued integrity and coexistence of the different ecotypes and of locally adapted sub-populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
biodiversity, brackish, climate, coastal, fish, fishing, genetics, migration, wetland
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-88825 (URN)10.1002/aqc.3196 (DOI)000481341300001 ()
Available from: 2019-08-29 Created: 2019-08-29 Last updated: 2019-08-29
Sunde, J., Tibblin, P., Larsson, P. & Forsman, A. (2018). Sex-specific effects of outbreeding on offspring quality in pike (Esox lucius). Ecology and Evolution, 8(21), 10448-10459
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sex-specific effects of outbreeding on offspring quality in pike (Esox lucius)
2018 (English)In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 8, no 21, p. 10448-10459Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Intraspecific genetic admixture occurs when previously separated populations withina species start interbreeding, and it can have either positive, negative, or neutral effectson reproductive performance. As there currently is no reliable predictor for theoutcome of admixture, an increased knowledge about admixture effects in differentspecies and populations is important to increase the understanding about what determinesthe response to admixture. We tested for effects of admixture on F1 offspringquality in three subpopulations of pike (Esox lucius). Gametes were collected inthe field, and eggs from each female were experimentally fertilized with milt from amale from each population (one “pure” and two “admixed” treatments). Three offspringquality measures (hatching success, fry survival, and fry length) were determinedand compared between (a) pure and admixed population combinations and (b)the sex-specifictreatments within each admixed population combination (based onthe origin of the male and female, respectively). The results suggested that althoughthere were no overall effects of admixture on offspring quality, the consequences fora given population combination could be sex-specificand thus differ depending onwhich of the parents originated from one or the other population. All offspring qualitytraits were influenced by both maternal ID and paternal ID. Sex-andindividual-specificeffects can have implications for dispersal behavior and gene flow betweennatural populations, and are important to consider in conservation efforts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
National Category
Evolutionary Biology Ecology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78895 (URN)10.1002/ece3.4510 (DOI)000450351400008 ()30464817 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054334923 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2017-00346Lars Hierta Memorial Foundation, FO2017-0113Ecosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Available from: 2018-11-20 Created: 2018-11-20 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Sunde, J., Tamario, C., Tibblin, P., Larsson, P. & Forsman, A. (2018). Variation in salinity tolerance between and within anadromous subpopulations of pike (Esox lucius). Scientific Reports, 8, Article ID 22.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Variation in salinity tolerance between and within anadromous subpopulations of pike (Esox lucius)
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2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Environmental heterogeneity is a key determinant of genetic and phenotypic diversity. Stable andhomogenous environments tends to result in evolution of specialism and local adaptations, whiletemporally unpredictable environments may maintain a diversity of specialists, promote generaliststrategies, or favour diversified bet hedging strategies. We compared salinity tolerance between twoanadromous subpopulations of pike (Esox Lucius) that utilize freshwater spawning sites with differentsalinity regimes. Eggs from each population were artificially fertilized and incubated in a salinitygradient (0, 3, 5, 7, and 9 psu) using a split-brood design. Effects on embryonic development, hatchingsuccess, survival of larvae, and fry body length were compared between populations and families.The population naturally spawning in the stable freshwater habitat showed signs of specialization forfreshwater spawning. The population exposed to fluctuating selective pressure in a spawning area withoccasional brackish water intrusions tolerated higher salinities and displayed considerable variation inreaction norms. Genetic differences and plasticity of salinity tolerance may enable populations to copewith changes in salinity regimes associated with future climate change. That geographically adjacentsubpopulations can constitute separate units with different genetic characteristics must be consideredin management and conservation efforts to avoid potentially negative effects of genetic admixture onpopulation fitness and persistence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-69620 (URN)10.1038/s41598-017-18413-8 (DOI)000419441300022 ()29311634 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85040446275 (Scopus ID)
Note

Author Correction: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-24805-1

The original version of this Article contained an error in the title of the paper, where the word “lucius” was incorrectly given as “1ucius”. This has now been corrected in the PDF and HTML versions of the Article.

Available from: 2018-01-08 Created: 2018-01-08 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Sunde, J. & Forsman, A. (2016). Mate choice is not consistent with short-term effects of intraspecific admixture in the common rough woodlouse (Porcellio scaber). Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 119(2), 359-369
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mate choice is not consistent with short-term effects of intraspecific admixture in the common rough woodlouse (Porcellio scaber)
2016 (English)In: Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4066, E-ISSN 1095-8312, Vol. 119, no 2, p. 359-369Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Theory posits that individuals should exhibit mate preferences in part based on genetic relatedness such that fitness is maximized. Intraspecific genetic admixture can have different effects depending on the genetic characteristics and evolutionary history of the individuals and populations involved. We investigated whether female mate choice behavior in the common rough woodlouse (Porcellio scaber) matched the fitness consequences of genetic admixture. We found that most females from two populations that were in sequence introduced to one male from each population mated with both males, and further that monandrous females (females that only mated with one male) predominantly mated with males from their own population. To test for effects of genetic admixture, females from four populations were divided into two replicate pairs and assigned to mate either with a male from the same population as the female (pure) or with a male from the other population (admixed). The effect of mating treatment on the proportion of females that produced eggs and hatched young, as well as on the number and viability of offspring depended on female source population. Mating treatment had opposing effects in two of the populations, whereas there were no detectable effects in the other two populations. Contrary to what was expected, the mating patterns did not match the observed effects of genetic admixture. We discuss alternative adaptive and non-adaptive explanations for the observed patterns.

National Category
Ecology Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Ecology, Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-52000 (URN)10.1111/bij.12811 (DOI)000386919000008 ()2-s2.0-84963969140 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-04-08 Created: 2016-04-08 Last updated: 2019-06-26Bibliographically approved
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