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Sathre, Roger
Publications (10 of 79) Show all publications
Gustavsson, L., Haus, S., Lundblad, M., Lundström, A., Ortiz, C. A., Sathre, R., . . . Wikberg, P.-E. (2017). Climate change effects of forestry and substitution of carbon-intensive materials and fossil fuels. Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, 67, 612-624
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate change effects of forestry and substitution of carbon-intensive materials and fossil fuels
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2017 (English)In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 67, p. 612-624Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We estimate the climate effects of directing forest management in Sweden towards increased carbon storage in forests with more land set-aside for protection, or towards increased forest production for the substitution of carbon-intensive materials and fossil fuels, relative to a reference case of current forest management. We develop various scenarios of forest management and biomass use to estimate the carbon balances of the forest systems, including ecological and technological components, and their impacts on the climate in terms of radiative forcing. The scenario with increased set-aside area and the current level of forest residue harvest resulted in lower cumulative carbon emissions compared to the reference case for the first 90 years, but then showed higher emissions as reduced forest harvest led to higher carbon emissions from energy and material systems. For the reference case of current forest management, increased harvest of forest residues gave increased climate benefits. The most climatically beneficial alternative, expressed as reduced cumulative radiative forcing, in both the short and long terms is a strategy aimed at high forest production, high residue recovery rate, and high efficiency utilization of harvested biomass. Active forest management with high harvest levels and efficient forest product utilization will provide more climate benefit, compared to reducing harvest and storing more carbon in the forest.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Biomass residues ; Forest management ; Climate change ; Radiative forcing
National Category
Forest Science
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-57660 (URN)10.1016/j.rser.2016.09.056 (DOI)000389088900046 ()
Available from: 2016-10-28 Created: 2016-10-28 Last updated: 2018-01-04Bibliographically approved
Sathre, R., Gustavsson, L. & Truong, N. L. (2017). Climate effects of electricity production fuelled by coal, forest slash and municipal solid waste with and without carbon capture. Energy, 122, 711-723
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate effects of electricity production fuelled by coal, forest slash and municipal solid waste with and without carbon capture
2017 (English)In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 122, p. 711-723Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We analyse the climate implications of producing electricity in large-scale conversion plants using coal, forest slash and municipal solid waste with and without carbon capture and storage (CCS). We calculate the primary energy, carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emission profiles, and the cumulative radiative forcing (CRF) of different systems that produce the same amount of electricity. We find that using slash or waste for electricity production instead of coal somewhat increases the instantaneous CO2 emission from the power plant, but avoids significant subsequent emissions from decaying slash in forests or waste in landfills. For slash used instead of coal, we find robust near- and long-term reductions in total emissions and CRF. Climate effects of using waste instead of coal are more ambiguous: CRF is reduced when CCS is used, but without CCS there is little or no climate benefits of using waste directly for energy, assuming that landfill gas is recovered and used for electricity production. The application of CCS requires more fuel, but strongly reduces the CO2 emissions. The use of slash or waste together with CCS results in negative net emissions and CRF, i.e. global cooling.

Keywords
Forest residues; Landfill; Carbon capture and storage; Radiative forcing; Fuel substitution
National Category
Energy Systems Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-61035 (URN)10.1016/j.energy.2017.01.076 (DOI)000399267100060 ()
Available from: 2017-03-01 Created: 2017-03-01 Last updated: 2017-05-24Bibliographically approved
Dodoo, A., Gustavsson, L. & Sathre, R. (2016). Climate impacts of wood vs. non-wood buildings. Sveriges Kommuner och Landsting
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate impacts of wood vs. non-wood buildings
2016 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This report documents the findings of a project commissioned by the SwedishAssociation of Local Authorities and Regions on energy and climateimplications of building structural-frame materials from a life cycle perspective.The report is compiled by researchers within the Sustainable Built EnvironmentGroup (SBER) at Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden, and it addresses theterms of reference of the project agreement, including review of existingliterature and reports on energy and climate implications of wood-frame andnon-wood-frame building systems.The report’s primarily focus is: the effect of material choice on different lifecycle stages of a building; the significance of building frame material in relationto the total primary energy use and climate impact of a building; keymethodological issues linked to life cycle analysis of buildings; and theimportance of system perspective in analysis of a building’s climate impacts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sveriges Kommuner och Landsting, 2016. p. 54
National Category
Building Technologies Environmental Analysis and Construction Information Technology
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Sustainable Built Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-48414 (URN)978-91-7585-377-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-12-16 Created: 2015-12-16 Last updated: 2017-03-08Bibliographically approved
Truong, N. L., Gustavsson, L. & Sathre, R. (2016). Primary energy and climate change effects of forest residues and fossil coal for electricity production with and without carbon capture and storage. In: 24th European Biomass Conference and Exhibition. Hamburg, Germany, June 23-26, 2016, Amsterdam, The Netherlands: . Paper presented at 24th European Biomass Conference and Exhibition. Hamburg, Germany, June 23-26, 2016, Amsterdam, The Netherlands (pp. 1394-1401). ETA-Florence Renewable Energies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Primary energy and climate change effects of forest residues and fossil coal for electricity production with and without carbon capture and storage
2016 (English)In: 24th European Biomass Conference and Exhibition. Hamburg, Germany, June 23-26, 2016, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, ETA-Florence Renewable Energies , 2016, p. 1394-1401Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Forest biomass that is currently unused, such as thinning and harvest residues, could be mobilized to produce bioelectricity, to mitigate climate change. An emerging technology for climate change mitigation is carbon capture and storage (CCS), which can reduce CO2 emissions from energy conversion facilities, but at a cost of additional fuel needed for process energy requirements. The use of forest residues that otherwise would decay on the forest floor, in an energy plant equipped with CCS, could result in a net reduction of CO2 emission to the atmosphere, while producing usable electricity. In this study, we analyse the climate change effects of using either coal or forest residues to produce electricity in large-scale conversion plants. We estimate the primary energy use, annual CO2 emission, annual change in CO2 concentration in the atmosphere and cumulative radiative forcing (CRF) of different energy systems that all produce the same quantity of electricity. We also consider the potential effects of future technology developments including gasification and integrated carbon capture processes. The results show that using forest residues to replace coal with current conversion technologies slightly increase the combustion CO2 emission, but in the long term give much lower net CO2 emission and mitigate climate change. The application of emerging gasification technology reduces primary energy use and CO2 emission compared to current technology, and hence increases the climate benefits. The use of CCS requires larger quantities of fuel, but could strongly reduce the CO2 emissions from conversion facilities, thus increasing the carbon benefits per unit of forest biomass used.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ETA-Florence Renewable Energies, 2016
Keywords
forest residues, carbon capture and storage, radiative forcing, fuel substitution, primary energy use
National Category
Forest Science Bioenergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-57664 (URN)10.5071/24thEUBCE2016-4DO.5.4 (DOI)978-88-89407-165 (ISBN)
Conference
24th European Biomass Conference and Exhibition. Hamburg, Germany, June 23-26, 2016, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Available from: 2016-10-28 Created: 2016-10-28 Last updated: 2016-11-22Bibliographically approved
Gustavsson, L., Sathre, R. & Dodoo, A. (2015). Climate change effects over the lifecycle of a building - Report on methodological issues in determining the climate change effects over the life cycle of a building: Final report for Boverket.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate change effects over the lifecycle of a building - Report on methodological issues in determining the climate change effects over the life cycle of a building: Final report for Boverket
2015 (English)Report (Other academic)
Publisher
p. 54
National Category
Environmental Engineering Building Technologies
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Civil engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-46701 (URN)
Available from: 2015-10-09 Created: 2015-10-09 Last updated: 2017-03-08Bibliographically approved
Gustavsson, L., Haus, S., Ortiz, C. A., Sathre, R. & Truong, N. L. (2015). Climate effects of bioenergy from forest residues in comparison to fossil energy. Applied Energy, 138, 36-50
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate effects of bioenergy from forest residues in comparison to fossil energy
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2015 (English)In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 138, p. 36-50Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Forest residues can be left at the harvest site to gradually decompose, or can be collected for energy purposes. This study analyzes the primary energy and climate impacts of bioenergy systems where forest residues are collected and used for electricity, heat and transportation, compared to fossil-based energy systems where fossil fuels provide the same services while forest residues are left on site to decompose. Time profiles are elaborated of primary energy use and carbon dioxide emissions from various energy applications fulfilled by bioenergy or fossil energy systems. Different biological decay functions are considered based on process-based modeling and inventory data across various climate zones. For all scenarios, the changes in cumulative radiative forcing (CRF) are calculated over a 300-year period, to evaluate the short- and long-term contributions of forest residue to climate change mitigation. A life cycle perspective along the full energy chains is used to evaluate the overall effectiveness of each system. The results show largest primary energy and climate benefits when forest residues are collected and used efficiently for energy services. Using biomass to substitute fossil coal provides greater climate change mitigation benefits than substituting oil or fossil gas. Some bioenergy substitutions result in positive CRF, i.e. increased global warming, during an initial period. This occurs for relatively inefficient bioenergy conversion pathways to substitute less carbon intensive fossil fuels, e.g. biomotor fuel used to replace diesel. More beneficial bioenergy substitutions, such as efficiently replacing coal, result immediately in reduced CRF. Biomass decay rates and transportation distance have less influence on climate benefits.

Keywords
forest residues, primary energy, carbon dioxide, radiative forcing, fuel substitution
National Category
Other Environmental Biotechnology
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Bioenergy Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-37493 (URN)10.1016/j.apenergy.2014.10.013 (DOI)000347582700005 ()2-s2.0-84909957910 (Scopus ID)
Note

Correction published in: Applied Energy, 2016, vol. 170, pp. 490-493.DOI: 10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.02.087

Available from: 2014-10-06 Created: 2014-10-06 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved
Dodoo, A., Gustavsson, L. & Sathre, R. (2015). Modeling Carbon Footprint of Wood-Based Products and Buildings. In: Subramanian Senthilkannan Muthu (Ed.), The Carbon Footprint Handbook: (pp. 143-162). London: CRC Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modeling Carbon Footprint of Wood-Based Products and Buildings
2015 (English)In: The Carbon Footprint Handbook / [ed] Subramanian Senthilkannan Muthu, London: CRC Press, 2015, p. 143-162Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: CRC Press, 2015
National Category
Building Technologies
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-43188 (URN)9781482262223 (ISBN)
Note

About the book

Thorough and detailed, The Carbon Footprint Handbookencompasses all areas of carbon footprint, including the scientific elements, methodological and technological aspects, standards, industrial case studies, and communication of carbon footprint results. Written and edited by an international group of experts, the far-ranging topics on carbon footprinting are divided into three sections comprising chapters focused on methodology, modeling, and case studies.

The concepts of carbon footprint and climate change are no longer new to the world. As a result, there is increasing interest in quantifying and reducing the carbon footprint around the world, from industrial to individual levels. This book describes modeling aspects and calculations of carbon footprint in organizations and production. It emphasizes the importance of locating non-polluting energy sources as well as sustainability. The book also provides case studies offering a wealth of information on practices and methods in detecting and addressing carbon footprint.

The Carbon Footprint Handbook is an important reference that discusses, in depth, the essential details of carbon footprint assessment. It uses research and case studies on methods and practices from locations around the world including China, India, Spain, and Latin America. It demonstrates that the problems of carbon footprint are indeed worldwide while showing how they can be addressed in myriad areas of life, from industrial to personal action.

Available from: 2015-05-12 Created: 2015-05-12 Last updated: 2017-03-08Bibliographically approved
Haus, S., Gustavsson, L. & Sathre, R. (2014). Climate mitigation comparison of woody biomass systems with the inclusion of land-use in the reference fossil system. Biomass and Bioenergy, 65, 136-144
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate mitigation comparison of woody biomass systems with the inclusion of land-use in the reference fossil system
2014 (English)In: Biomass and Bioenergy, ISSN 0961-9534, E-ISSN 1873-2909, Vol. 65, p. 136-144Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While issues of land-use have been considered in many direct analyses of biomass systems, little attention has heretofore been paid to land-use in reference fossil systems. Here we address this limitation by comparing forest biomass systems to reference fossil systems with explicit consideration of land-use in both systems. We estimate and compare the time profiles of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission and cumulative radiative forcing (CRF) of woody biomass systems and reference fossil systems. A life cycle perspective is used that includes all significant elements of both systems, including GHG emissions along the full material and energy chains. We consider the growth dynamics of forests under different management regimes, as well as energy and material substitution effects of harvested biomass. We determine the annual net emissions of CO2, N2O and CH4 for each system over a 240-year period, and then calculate time profiles of cRF as a proxy measurement of climate change impact. The results show greatest potential for climate change mitigation when intensive forest management is applied in the woody biomass system. This methodological framework provides a tool to help determine optimal strategies for managing forests so as to minimize climate change impacts. The inclusion of land-use in the reference system improves the accuracy of quantitative projections of climate benefits of biomass-based systems. (c) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Life cycle assessment, Greenhouse gases, Cumulative radiative forcing, Land-use, Time dynamics, Woody bioenergy
National Category
Energy Systems
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Bioenergy Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-36191 (URN)10.1016/j.biombioe.2014.04.012 (DOI)000337854900015 ()2-s2.0-84901255653 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-07-24 Created: 2014-07-24 Last updated: 2018-01-04Bibliographically approved
Gustavsson, L., Haus, S., Ortiz, C., Sathre, R. & Truong, N. L. (2014). Dynamic impacts of forest residues on primary energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. In: The 9th Conference on Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems - SDEWES. September 20 - 27, 2014, Venice-Istanbul: . Paper presented at The 9th Conference on Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems - SDEWES. September 20 - 27, 2014, Venice-Istanbul.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamic impacts of forest residues on primary energy use and greenhouse gas emissions
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2014 (English)In: The 9th Conference on Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems - SDEWES. September 20 - 27, 2014, Venice-Istanbul, 2014Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Keywords
forest residues, primary energy, carbon dioxide, radiative forcing, fuel substitution
National Category
Environmental Engineering Bioenergy
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Bioenergy Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-37800 (URN)
Conference
The 9th Conference on Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems - SDEWES. September 20 - 27, 2014, Venice-Istanbul
Available from: 2014-10-23 Created: 2014-10-23 Last updated: 2017-03-08Bibliographically approved
Dodoo, A., Gustavsson, L. & Sathre, R. (2014). Lifecycle carbon implications of conventional and low-energy multi-storey timber building systems. Energy and Buildings, 82, 194-210
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lifecycle carbon implications of conventional and low-energy multi-storey timber building systems
2014 (English)In: Energy and Buildings, ISSN 0378-7788, E-ISSN 1872-6178, Vol. 82, p. 194-210Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A consequential-based lifecycle approach is used here to explore the carbon implications of conventional and low-energy versions of three timber multi-storey building systems. The building systems are made of massive wood using cross laminated timber (CLT) elements; beam-and-column using glulam and laminated veneer lumber (LVL) elements; and prefabricated modules using light-frame volume elements. The analysis encompasses the entire resource chains during the lifecycle of the buildings, and tracks the flows of carbon from fossil energy, industrial process reactions, changes in carbon stocks in materials, and potential avoided fossil emissions from substitution of fossil energy by woody residues. The results show that the low-energy version of the CLT building gives the lowest lifecycle carbon emission while the conventional version of the beam-and-column building gives the highest lifecycle emission. Compared to the conventional designs, the low-energy designs reduce the total carbon emissions (excluding from tap water heating and household and facility electricity) by 9%, 8% and 9% for the CLT, beam-and-column and modular systems, respectively, for a 50-year lifespan located in Växjö. The relative significance of the construction materials to the fossil carbon emission varies for the different energy-efficiency levels of the buildings, with insulation dominating for the low-energy houses and plasterboard dominating for the conventional houses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
National Category
Construction Management
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-36618 (URN)10.1016/j.enbuild.2014.06.034 (DOI)000343781400020 ()2-s2.0-84905380076 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-08-26 Created: 2014-08-26 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
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