lnu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Larsson, Lena
Publications (10 of 43) Show all publications
Moen, K. M., Westlie, K., Gerdin, G., Smith, W., Linnér, S., Philpot, R., . . . Larsson, L. (2019). Caring teaching and the complexity of building good relationships as pedagogies for social justice in health and physical education. Sport, Education and Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Caring teaching and the complexity of building good relationships as pedagogies for social justice in health and physical education
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The Health and Physical Education (HPE) profession has increasingly advocated for caring teacher-student relationships. In this paper, we draw on data from an international research project called 'EDUHEALTH' [Education for Equitable Health Outcomes - The Promise of School Health and Physical Education] to explore caring teaching and the complexity of building good relationships as pedagogies for social justice in HPE. The data reported on in this paper were generated through 20 HPE lesson observations and interviews with 13 HPE teachers across schools in Sweden, Norway and New Zealand. In our analysis of the data, we employed Nel Noddings 'Care Theory' [(1984. Caring, a feminine approach to ethics & moral education. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press; 1997). Pedagogisk filosofi [Philosophy of education]. Oslo: Ad Notam Gyldendal] to study the constitution of relationships and caring teaching in HPE practice. The findings demonstrate that caring teaching is inevitably built on developing good relationships, and that developing such good relationships is a complex process influenced by three key elements. First, teachers have to develop knowledge about their students on a societal, group and personal level; second, teachers have to reflect on the individual, environmental and relational aspects required for building good relationships; and third, teachers have to implement caring teaching strategies, such as planning, caring actions and doing 'the little things'. Drawing on Nodding's care theory, we conclude that pedagogies for social justice are enacted when teachers use their own knowledge and knowledge about the students, together with reflection and caring teaching strategies, to arrange a learning environment that promotes inclusion and equitable outcomes for all students.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Keywords
Caring, relationships, social justice, pedagogies, physical education
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, Education; Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-90076 (URN)10.1080/13573322.2019.1683535 (DOI)000493228500001 ()
Available from: 2019-11-19 Created: 2019-11-19 Last updated: 2019-12-18
Schenker, K., Linnér, S., Smith, W., Gerdin, G., Mordal Moen, K., Philpot, R., . . . Westlie, K. (2019). Conceptualising social justice – what constitutes pedagogies for social justice in HPE across different contexts?. Curriculum Studies in Health and Physical Education, 10(2), 126-140
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conceptualising social justice – what constitutes pedagogies for social justice in HPE across different contexts?
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Curriculum Studies in Health and Physical Education, ISSN 2574-2981, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 126-140Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The paper explores the concept of social justice in Health andPhysical Education (HPE) as constituted and addressed acrossthree different countries – Sweden, Norway and New Zealand –and how HPE teaching practices for social justice may beunderstood from regulative, normative and cultural/cognitiveperspectives. Although much has been written about social justicein the field of HPE over the last three decades, there is littleresearch that has examined how teachers operationalise teachingfor social justice. Drawing on the experiences and insights gainedfrom an international collaboration project, that sought to addressthis knowledge gap, this paper examines what constitutespedagogies for social justice in HPE across different contexts. Theaim of this paper is to discuss: (i) our conceptualisation of socialjustice; and (ii) how this can be understood in relation to HPEpractice across different contexts. We conclude that what isregarded as important content for the teaching of social justicevaries from one context to another although there are also similarapproaches. Additionally, there is much to learn by seeing ‘it’, thatis, the nature of social justice and how this is played out in schoolHPE – from the ‘others’ perspectives’.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Keywords
Social justice, pedagogy, education, health, physical education
National Category
Educational Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sociology, Sociology Education; Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-82402 (URN)10.1080/25742981.2019.1609369 (DOI)2-s2.0-85066868225 (Scopus ID)
Projects
EDUHEALTH
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 734928
Available from: 2019-05-03 Created: 2019-05-03 Last updated: 2019-12-18Bibliographically approved
Redelius, K., Larsson, L., Larsson, H. & Lundvall, S. (2019). Physical education and teacher education in Sweden. In: Ann MacPhail, Deborah Tannehill, Zuleyha Avsar (Ed.), European physical education teacher education practices: initial, induction, and professional development: Initial, induction, and professional development (pp. 379-396). Meyer & Meyer Sport
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical education and teacher education in Sweden
2019 (English)In: European physical education teacher education practices: initial, induction, and professional development: Initial, induction, and professional development / [ed] Ann MacPhail, Deborah Tannehill, Zuleyha Avsar, Meyer & Meyer Sport, 2019, p. 379-396Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Meyer & Meyer Sport, 2019
National Category
Educational Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science; Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-90371 (URN)9781782551775 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-12-04 Created: 2019-12-04 Last updated: 2020-01-16Bibliographically approved
Gerdin, G., Philpot, R. A., Larsson, L., Schenker, K., Linnér, S., Mordal Moen, K., . . . Legge, M. (2019). Researching social justice and health (in)equality across different school health and physical education contexts in Sweden, Norway and New Zealand. European Physical Education Review, 25(1), 273-290
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Researching social justice and health (in)equality across different school health and physical education contexts in Sweden, Norway and New Zealand
Show others...
2019 (English)In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 273-290Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The way school Health and Physical Education (HPE) is conceptualized and taught will impact on its ability to provide equitable outcomes across gender, sexuality, ethnicity, religion and social class. A focus on social justice in HPE is pertinent in times when these ideals are currently under threat from neoliberal globalization. This paper draws on data from the initial year of an international collaboration project called ‘Education for Equitable Health Outcomes – The Promise of School Health and Physical Education’ involving HPE and Physical Education Teacher Education researchers from Sweden, Norway and New Zealand. The data in this paper record the researchers’ presentations and discussions about issues of social justice and health as informed by school visits and interviews with HPE teachers in the three different countries. The analysis of the data is focused on what is addressed in the name of social justice in each of the three countries and how cross-cultural researchers of social justice in HPE interpret different contexts. In order to analyse the data, we draw on Michael Uljens’s concepts of non-affirmative and non-hierarchical education. The findings suggest that researching social justice and health (in)equality across different countries offers both opportunities and challenges when it comes to understanding the enactment of social justice in school and HPE practices. We conclude by drawing on Uljens to assert that the quest for social justice in HPE should focus on further problematizing affirmative and hierarchical educational practices since social justice teaching strategies are enabled and constrained by the contexts in which they are practised.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Health, equality, social justice, physical education, socially-critical perspective
National Category
Educational Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences; Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77144 (URN)10.1177/1356336X18783916 (DOI)000454077600018 ()2-s2.0-85049624484 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 734928
Available from: 2018-08-16 Created: 2018-08-16 Last updated: 2020-01-15Bibliographically approved
Gerdin, G., Smith, W., Mordal Moen, K., Westlie, K., Larsson, L., Schenker, K., . . . Linnér, S. (2018). Researching social justice and health (in)equality across different school health and physical education contexts. In: : . Paper presented at European Conference on Educational Research, ECER 2018, Bolzano, 3-7 Sept, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Researching social justice and health (in)equality across different school health and physical education contexts
Show others...
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Although school Health and Physical Education (HPE) has the potential to contribute to lifelong health and well-being, the way HPE isconceptualized and taught will impact on its ability to provide equitable outcomes across gender, sexuality, ethnicity, religion and socialclass. The genesis of this symposium comes from the ongoing international collaboration project - Education for Equitable HealthOutcomes - The Promise of School Health and Physical Education (EDUHEALTH) consisting of Physical Education Teacher Education(PETE) teachers and researchers from Sweden, Norway and New Zealand. The aim of the EDUHEALTH project is to contribute to theunderstanding of how teachers of HPE teach for social justice by examining the teaching practices of teachers. A focus on equity,democracy and social justice in HPE can be seen as particularly pertinent in times when these ideals are currently under threat fromneoliberal globalisation (Azzarito, Macdonald, Dagkas & Fisette, 2017). The research question guiding this project are: (i) How do HPE teachers’ practices address democracy and social justice? (ii) How may HPE practice contribute to greater inclusion and equitable health outcomes for all students? The session will begin with an introduction to the symposium followed by the first part of paper one which will provide a brief overview ofthe background and implementation of the EDUHEALTH project to date.The second paper will then explicate our conceptualisation of the term social justice as concerned with equity, taking account of many variables including gender, sexuality, socioeconomic, and ethnicity, and within the context of HPE, physicality. The discussion on this paper will draw on Bell’s (1997) concept of social justice as both a process and a goal along with Wright’s (2004) claim that a pedagogy focused on social justice embraces emancipatory practices or processes that have the goal of helping students identify, challenge and transform existing unequal power relations relating to physical activity and health. In this paper we will also discuss the different theoretical perspectives that we are considering in relation to understanding and subsequently analysing social justice in HPE as informed by the works of, for instance, Habermas, Bourdieu, Foucault and Uljens. The third paper will then discuss our methodology and methods for generating data involving HPE class observations and teacher interview in the three different countries and employing a critical incident technique (Tripp, 2012) along with stimulated-recall interviews toexplore HPE teaching practices that enact socially-critical perspective of physical activity and health. At the conclusion of the third paper we will return to the first paper and draw on some initial findings of this project to date in terms of the potential, and difficulties, of researching social justice and health (in)equality across different school health and physical education contexts. The potential comes from having outsiders critically examining the societal, educational, and HPE context and offering new insights. The difficulties are in reaching a shared understanding of what it means to be socially critical and applying this understanding in each of the three different contexts. At the end we tentatively suggest that in our ongoing work with this project and by drawing on Freire (2000) and Tinning (2010) that there is no ‘holy grail’ in terms of a social justice teaching method for HPE practice since teaching strategies are enabled and constrained by the contexts in which they are practiced. Finally, a discussant will reflect on the work presented and the nature of the project before opening the floor to the audience for the final 20 minutes of the symposium.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81685 (URN)
Conference
European Conference on Educational Research, ECER 2018, Bolzano, 3-7 Sept, 2018
Projects
EDUHEALTH
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 734928
Available from: 2019-04-04 Created: 2019-04-04 Last updated: 2019-04-12Bibliographically approved
Larsson, L., Linnér, S. & Schenker, K. (2018). The doxa of physical education teacher education – set in stone?. European Physical Education Review, 24(1), 114-130
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The doxa of physical education teacher education – set in stone?
2018 (English)In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 114-130Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we critically examine the potential of assessment components in physical education teacher education (PETE) to either reinforce or challenge PETE students’ conceptions of what a physical education (PE) teacher needs to know to teach this school subject. To understand the mechanisms that may contribute to the difficulty of challenging these taken-for-granted beliefs (doxa) within PETE, we draw on the theories and concepts of Pierre Bourdieu. Two different kinds of empirical material are analysed: one consists of 62 essays, written by PETE students before starting their degree programme, dealing with their conceptions of PE teachers’ competencies, while the second consists of course booklets and assessment components used within one PETE programme. The study shows that implicit prerequisites and conditions in assessment components are very similar to the conceptions of competencies in PETE students’ statements. The study also shows that taken-for-granted beliefs may be challenged, but at the same time, we argue, the use of socially critical perspectives in PE practice may also (in the name of the doxa) stigmatise those who are not physically active in their leisure time as well as those who do not look fit and sporty, and thus does not challenge the way power and social superiority or inferiority appear in PE.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Assessments, Bourdieu, PETE, PETE students, teacher competencies
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-56507 (URN)10.1177/1356336X16668545 (DOI)000423179600007 ()2-s2.0-85041112424 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-14 Created: 2016-09-14 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Larsson, L., Schenker, K., Gerdin, G. & Linnér, S. (2017). Challenging PETE. Steering mechanisms and teaching logics preserving old traditions. In: : . Paper presented at ECER (European Conference on Educational Research), Köpenhamn, Danmark, 22-25/8 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenging PETE. Steering mechanisms and teaching logics preserving old traditions
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Contemporary physical education in Sweden is characterized by a strong tradition of sport and ball games which school curriculumreforms in the last few decades seem to have had no significant impact on. Despite new curricula in Sweden, HPE teachers’ practicesremain unchanged. HPE teachers still have problems catering to the needs of all their pupils (Annerstedt & Larsson, 2010; Ekberg, 2016;Redelius et al. 2009). Success in PE in the form of high grades is related to active participation in sport clubs (Jakobsson et al., 2012).One of the government’s instruments for regulating teaching in PE in schools in Sweden is teacher education. The latest reforms ofSwedish teacher education including physical education teacher education (PETE) place higher scientific/academic demands on teachereducation programmes. One of the goals is to develop PETE students’ ability to adopt socially critical approaches and the studentsshould, for instance, be provided opportunities to identify, analyse and question the different beliefs, norms and values that pervade PEand that may act to exclude some pupils (SOU, 2008). However, research indicates that despite these reforms, Swedish PETE does notchallenge students’ conceptions about how the subject should be taught to any great extent (Schenker, 2016). The PETE students’ stillwant to pursue their passion for sport through teaching practices designed to lead to their pupils (even the uninterested ones) developingthe same sport interests (Larsson, 2009). Larsson et al. (2016) found that although socially critical perspectives exists in PETE today,reforming the PETE curriculum per se does not necessarily challenge the doxa of PETE. As a matter of fact, the use of socially criticalperspectives in PETE may (in the name of the doxa) not challenge how power and social superiority or inferiority appear in the subject.Doxa might not be set in stone, but there seems to be a need to thoroughly reconstruct PETE if future PE teachers are going to developsocially critical approaches that truly challenge the prevailing assumptions about what competencies a PE teacher should have. In thispaper the key members from Sweden involved in the EDUHEALTH project will share some of their research findings to date. We willdiscuss mechanisms that may contribute to the difficulty of challenging taken for granted beliefs within Swedish PETE and how and whyteachers’ presumptions and teaching logics, like the one of competitive sport, continue to exclude some children and youth.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-68027 (URN)
Conference
ECER (European Conference on Educational Research), Köpenhamn, Danmark, 22-25/8 2017
Projects
EDUHEALTH - Educating for Equitable Health Outcomes- the Promise of School Health and Physical Education
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 734928
Available from: 2017-09-19 Created: 2017-09-19 Last updated: 2019-05-03Bibliographically approved
Smith, W., Larsson, L., Mordal-Moen, K. & Gerdin, G. (2017). EDUHEALTH - Educating for equitable health outcomes in physical education. In: : . Paper presented at ECER (European Conference on Educational Research)Research), Köpenhamn, Danmark, 22-25/8 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>EDUHEALTH - Educating for equitable health outcomes in physical education
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

School HPE makes a unique contribution to the physical, cognitive, emotional and social development of young people (Morgan & Burke,2008). The world summit on HPE in 1999 (Doll-Tepper & Scoretz, 2001) stated that this school subject provides the most effective meansof providing all young people, regardless of their ability, disability, sex, age, culture, race, ethnicity, religion, or social background, with theskills, attitudes, knowledge, and understanding for lifelong health and well-being. One point of departure in this EDUHEALTH project isthat the attainment of health equity goals can be accelerated when social justice and socially-critical perspectives underpin HPE teachingpractices to assist ‘students to examine and challenge the status quo, the dominant constructions of reality and the power relations thatproduce inequities, in ways that can lead to advocacy and community action’ (Wright, 2004, p. 7). New Zealand, Sweden and Norway areunique in that contemporary social justice issues foreground each countries’ HPE curricula – as introduced in the late 1990s. Calls fortertiary teacher education institutions to ensure that their graduating HPE teachers have an understanding of how socially-critical HPEmay be enacted, have led to a growing, if scattered, research base that articulates relevant practices in HPE teacher education. Yet thereis a paucity of research that documents how HPE teachers are imparting socially-critical perspectives in their schools: this paper willdiscuss how the EDUHEALTH project focuses on this critical research gap. EDUHEALTH will study HPE teachers’ practices in schoolsusing a Critical Incident Technique (CIT) inspired methodology (Tripp, 2012) to identify HPE teaching practices that clearly enact sociallycriticalperspective of physical activity and health. Data will be collected through multiple observations and interviews of HPE teachers inall three countries. This data will be analysed through a multi-phase process of inductive thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2013) withfindings validated through triangulation of multiple observer reports and by a shared analysis of data by all 15 researchers affiliated withEDUHEALTH. This paper will report on some initial findings generated as part of the pilot studies. Ultimately, the findings of thiscollaborative research project will inform the creation of teaching strategies designed to assist HPE teachers in their own contexts todevelop more inclusive teaching practices, thus, contributing to more active, healthier citizens.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-68025 (URN)
Conference
ECER (European Conference on Educational Research)Research), Köpenhamn, Danmark, 22-25/8 2017
Projects
EDUHEALTH - Educating for Equitable Health Outcomes- the Promise of School Health and Physical Education
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 734928
Available from: 2017-09-19 Created: 2017-09-19 Last updated: 2019-05-03Bibliographically approved
Redelius, K., Standal, Ø., Larsson, L., Schenker, K., Gerdin, G., Linnér, S., . . . Legge, M. (2017). EDUHEALTH - Educating for equitable health outcomes in physical education.: Sweden, Norway and New Zealand in a Horizon 2020 project. (Symposium). In: Presented at ECER 2017: . Paper presented at ECER 2017 (European Conference on Educational Research), Copenhagen, 22-25 Aug.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>EDUHEALTH - Educating for equitable health outcomes in physical education.: Sweden, Norway and New Zealand in a Horizon 2020 project. (Symposium)
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Presented at ECER 2017, 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-73357 (URN)
Conference
ECER 2017 (European Conference on Educational Research), Copenhagen, 22-25 Aug
Projects
EDUHEALTH
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020
Available from: 2018-04-23 Created: 2018-04-23 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved
Larsson, L. & Meckbach, J. (2015). Att utveckla rekryteringsmetoder och stödjande miljöer för unga ledare. In: Josef Fahlén, Staffan Karp (Ed.), Idéer för idrottsutveckling: (pp. 60-74). Stockholm: SISU idrottsböcker
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Att utveckla rekryteringsmetoder och stödjande miljöer för unga ledare
2015 (Swedish)In: Idéer för idrottsutveckling / [ed] Josef Fahlén, Staffan Karp, Stockholm: SISU idrottsböcker , 2015, p. 60-74Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: SISU idrottsböcker, 2015
Keywords
unga ledare habitus stödjande miljöer rekrytering
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences; Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-50196 (URN)978-91-87745-59-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-03-04 Created: 2016-03-04 Last updated: 2016-04-26Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications