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Almerud Österberg, SofiaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2602-0101
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Publications (10 of 40) Show all publications
Almerud Österberg, S., Hörberg, U., Ozolins, L.-L., Werkander Harstäde, C. & Elmqvist, C. (2023). Exposed: a semantic concept analysis of its origin, meaning change over time and its relevance for caring science. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 18(1), Article ID 2163701.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exposed: a semantic concept analysis of its origin, meaning change over time and its relevance for caring science
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2023 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 2163701Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: A patient is vulnerable and exposed due to illness, relies on and surrender to other people. In caring this means a special dependency. The aim of this study was to describe the origin of the concept ‘exposed’, to elucidate how the definition of this term has changed over time, and to outline its relevance in caring science. Method: A semantic concept analysis in two phases was conducted. Results: The findings show that over time, the degree of binding of the following synonyms has become stronger; unprotected/defenseless, naked/bare, pressed/jostled and unsafe/unprotected and can easily be transferred to a clinical nursing context. Conclusions: This study provides a deeper understanding of the concept 'exposed' semantically. Being exposed is a profound experience for patients who need to be seen as the person they really are. A life-world led care has an existential power that can support professionals, strengthen patients’ health processes, and alleviate the patient’s suffering.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
Caring science, concept analysis, exposedness, nursing care, suffering by care
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-118123 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2022.2163701 (DOI)000905716400001 ()36591614 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85145345133 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-01-03 Created: 2023-01-03 Last updated: 2023-01-30Bibliographically approved
Andersson, L., Almerud Österberg, S., Årestedt, K. & Johansson, P. (2022). Nurse anesthetist attitudes towards parental presence during anesthesia induction- a nationwide survey. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 78(4), 1020-1030
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurse anesthetist attitudes towards parental presence during anesthesia induction- a nationwide survey
2022 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 78, no 4, p. 1020-1030Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims To describe nurse anesthetists' attitudes towards the importance of parental presence during their child's anaesthesia induction and to explore associating factors. Design A cross-sectional design. Methods Nurse anesthetists from 55 Swedish hospitals were asked to participate (n = 1,285). A total of 809 completed the questionnaire, Families' Importance in Nursing Care-Nurses' Attitudes (FINC-NA) during 2018. Data were analysed by descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression analysis. Results Nurse anesthetists generally had a positive attitude towards the importance of parental presence. They reported a more positive attitude in family as a resource in nursing care (median = 40) followed by family as a conversational partner (median = 25), family not as a burden (median = 17) and family as its own resource (median = 13). Multiple linear regression analyses showed that working in a district hospital, working only with children, having routines/memorandum about parental presence, being a woman, allowing both parents to be present in their child's anaesthesia and greater experience of children's anesthesia, were associated with a more positive attitude. Conclusion This nationwide survey contributes important knowledge for understanding nurse anesthetists' attitudes and the result shows that nurse anesthetists generally have a positive attitude towards the importance of parents. Areas of improvement were, however, identified; the nurses tend to not value family as its own resource and family as a conversational partner highly. Impact Nurse anesthetists have a crucial role in children's anesthesia care since the quality of parental presence experience depends on a positive attitude from the nurses. Parental involvement is important to establish a child-centered anaesthesia care, which should be highlighted in the education of nurse anesthetists. Parental involvement should also be addressed in healthcare policies and routines should be established.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
Keywords
anaesthesia, attitudes, children, family, nurse, parent, perioperative
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-106874 (URN)10.1111/jan.15031 (DOI)000691101600001 ()34462946 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85113954317 (Scopus ID)2021 (Local ID)2021 (Archive number)2021 (OAI)
Available from: 2021-09-09 Created: 2021-09-09 Last updated: 2023-04-17Bibliographically approved
Segernäs, A., Skoog, J., Andersson, E. A., Almerud Österberg, S., Thulesius, H. & Zachrisson, H. (2022). Prediction of Postoperative Delirium After Cardiac Surgery with A Quick Test of Cognitive Speed, Mini-Mental State Examination and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Clinical Interventions in Aging, 17, 359-368
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prediction of Postoperative Delirium After Cardiac Surgery with A Quick Test of Cognitive Speed, Mini-Mental State Examination and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale
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2022 (English)In: Clinical Interventions in Aging, ISSN 1176-9092, E-ISSN 1178-1998, Vol. 17, p. 359-368Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To evaluate if preoperative assessment with A Quick Test of Cognitive Speed (AQT) could increase the accuracy of predicting delirium after cardiac surgery compared to Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and examine if a composite of variables, including cognitive function and depressive symptoms, could be useful to predict delirium. Patients and Methods: Cardiac surgery was performed in 218 patients (mean age 72 years). Preoperative evaluation involved AQT, MMSE and Hospital Anxiety And Depression Scale (HADS). Postoperative delirium was assessed using Nursing Delirium Screening Scale (Nu-DESC) and Confusion Assessment Method-ICU (CAM-ICU). Logistic regression was performed to detect predictors of postoperative delirium and receiver operator characteristic curves (ROC) with area under the curve (AUC) to determine the accuracy. Results: Postoperative delirium occurred in 47 patients (22%) who had lower MMSE scores (median (range), 27 (19-30) vs 28 (20- 30), p=0.009) and slower AQT (median (range), 76 (48-181) vs 70 (40-182) seconds, p=0.030) than patients without delirium. Predictive power measured as AUC (95% CI) was 0.605 (0.51-0.70) for AQT and 0.623 (0.53-0.72) for MMSE. Logistic regression (OR, 95% CI) showed MMSE 27 points (2.72, 1.27-5.86), AQT 70 sec (2.26, 1.03-4.95), HADS-D >4 points (2.60, 1.21-5.58) and longer cardiopulmonary bypass-time (1.007, 1.002-1.013) to be associated with postoperative delirium. Combining these parameters yielded an AUC of 0.736 (0.65-0.82). Conclusion: The ability of predicting delirium using AQT was similar to MMSE, and only slightly higher by combining AQT and MMSE. Adding HADS-D and cardiopulmonary bypass-time to MMSE and AQT increased the predictive power to a borderline acceptable discriminatory value. Preoperative cognitive tests and screening for depressive symptoms may help identify patients at risk of postoperative delirium. Yet, there is still a need to establish useful preoperative tests.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dove Medical Press Ltd, 2022
Keywords
postoperative delirium, cardiopulmonary bypass, Mini Mental State Examination, A Quick Test of Cognitive Speed, The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale
National Category
Surgery Psychology
Research subject
Natural Science, Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-112727 (URN)10.2147/CIA.S350195 (DOI)000783715800005 ()35400995 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85127860325 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-05-09 Created: 2022-05-09 Last updated: 2022-10-07Bibliographically approved
Qvistgaard, M., Nåtman, J., Lovebo, J., Almerud Österberg, S. & Rolfson, O. (2022). Risk factors for reoperation due to periprosthetic joint infection after elective total hip arthroplasty: a study of 35,056 patients using linked data of the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Registry (SHAR) and Swedish Perioperative Registry (SPOR). BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 23(1), Article ID 275.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk factors for reoperation due to periprosthetic joint infection after elective total hip arthroplasty: a study of 35,056 patients using linked data of the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Registry (SHAR) and Swedish Perioperative Registry (SPOR)
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2022 (English)In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 275Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

In Sweden, the incidence of a prosthetic joint infection (PJI) after a planned Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA) is 1.3%, but the worldwide incidence of PJI after THA is unknown. This study explores associations between reoperation due to PJI and potential risk factors.

Methods

Primary elective THA surgery registered in both the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Registry (SHAR) and the Swedish Perioperative Registry (SPOR) between 1 January 2015 and 31 December 2019 were included in this registry study, resulting in a total study population of 35,056 cases. The outcome variable was reoperation as the result of PJI within a year after surgery. Data were analysed using a multivariable Cox regression model.

Results

Reoperation due to PJI occurred in 460 cases (i.e., 1.3% of the study population). Each year of age increased the risk with 2% (HR 1.02 Cl 1.01, 1.03 P = < 0.001). Compared to men, women had significantly less risk for reoperation (HR 2.17 Cl 1.79, 2.53 P = < 0.001). For patients with obesity (BMI > 30), the risk increased considerably compared to underweight, normal weight, or overweight patients (HR 1.89 Cl 1.43, 2.51 P = < 0.001). The risk also increased by 6% for every 10 min of operative time (HR 1.06 Cl 1.02, 1.09 P = < 0.001). Patients having general anaesthesia had greater risk compared to those with spinal anaesthesia (HR 1.34 Cl 1.04, 1.73 P = 0.024). Finally, a lateral approach showed higher risk of reoperation than a posterior approach (HR 1.43 Cl 1.18, 1.73 P = < 0.001).

Conclusion

Recognition of the several risk factors identified in this study will be important for the perioperative management of patients undergoing THA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2022
Keywords
Periprosthetic joint infection, Operative time, Prevention, Reoperation, Total hip arthroplasty
National Category
Orthopaedics
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-110960 (URN)10.1186/s12891-022-05209-9 (DOI)000772425400002 ()35321672 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85127057279 (Scopus ID)2022 (Local ID)2022 (Archive number)2022 (OAI)
Available from: 2022-03-24 Created: 2022-03-24 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Andersson, L., Almerud Österberg, S., Johansson, P. & Knutsson, S. (2022). The interplay between children, their parents and anaesthesia staff during the child's anaesthesia - An observational study. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 31(15-16), 2240-2251
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The interplay between children, their parents and anaesthesia staff during the child's anaesthesia - An observational study
2022 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 31, no 15-16, p. 2240-2251Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objectives To interpret and understand the interplay between children, their parents, and anaesthetic staff to gain a greater understanding of children being anaesthetised. Background Anaesthesia induction is a stressful procedure for the child and parents in the technologically advanced environment in the operating room (OR). Anaesthesia staff are a key resource for ensuring safety and interplays, but the meeting is often short, intensive, and can affect the child and the parent. Design A qualitative observational design with a hermeneutic approach. Methods Twenty-seven non-participant observations were conducted and videotaped when children were being anaesthetised. The SRQR checklist was used. Results The result is presented as a theatre play with three headings; the scene, the actors, and the plot. The scene was not designed for the child or the parent's comfort and could lead to anxiety and insecurity. Four themes described the interplays: The need to be inviting and to be invited, The need for varying compliance, The need for mutual dependence, and The need to give and to receive emotional support. The plot could lead to uncertainty, and the interplay could change between being caring and uncaring depending on the actors. Conclusions The technologically advanced environment in the OR constituted an emotional obstacle, but the anaesthesia staff themselves can be a powerful resource creating a caring environment. The outcome of the plot may depend on the anaesthesia staff's bearing. Relevance to clinical practice A caring approach in the OR requires a willingness from the anaesthesia staff to invite the child to participate and find a balance between helping the parents to find their place in the OR and support them in supporting their child. The findings can start reflections in the unit on how to create a more caring environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
Keywords
anaesthesia care, anaesthesia staff, child, hermeneutic, interplay, observation, parents
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-107113 (URN)10.1111/jocn.16042 (DOI)000695719100001 ()34523185 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85114761088 (Scopus ID)2021 (Local ID)2021 (Archive number)2021 (OAI)
Available from: 2021-09-24 Created: 2021-09-24 Last updated: 2023-02-16Bibliographically approved
Qvistgaard, M., Almerud Österberg, S. & Lovebo, J. (2021). Covering surgical instruments with single- or double-layer drape pending surgery: an experimental study in a perioperative setting. Journal of Infection Prevention, 22(3), 126-131
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Covering surgical instruments with single- or double-layer drape pending surgery: an experimental study in a perioperative setting
2021 (English)In: Journal of Infection Prevention, ISSN 1757-1774, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 126-131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Surgical site infections (SSI) constitute a severe threat to surgery patients. The surgical environment must be as free of contaminating microorganisms as possible. Using sterile surgical instruments while performing surgery is an absolute necessity for ensuring quality of care in perioperative settings.

Aim: To compare bacterial contamination of agar plates after 15 h on set surgical instrument tables covered with a single- or double-layer drape.

Methods: An experimental design was used consisting of set instrument tables with six agar plates on each table: four instrument tables were covered with a single-layer drape and four instrument tables were covered with a double-layer drape. This set-up was repeated on nine occasions during the period of data collection, making 76 set instrument tables in total. As a control, one instrument table was uncovered on four of those occasions.

Results: The double-layer drape cover showed a significantly (P = 0.03) lower number of colony forming units (CFU) per agar plate than the single-layer drape covering. As expected, the uncovered instrument tables were highly contaminated.

Discussion: Our results indicate that it is good practice to cover instruments properly with at least a single-layer drape before a surgical procedure. If there is difficulty achieving optimal conditions while setting the instrument tables (e.g. positioning the patient for general anaesthesia), it is a better option to set the instrument tables earlier and cover them with a double-layer drape. These precautions will help protect the patient from harm and unnecessary SSI by lowering microbiological burden, a key factor in developing SSI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2021
Keywords
colony forming unit, perioperative care, surgical instrument, surgical site infection
National Category
Surgery
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-103020 (URN)10.1177/1757177420973753 (DOI)000775468300004 ()34234845 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85097307093 (Scopus ID)2020 (Local ID)2020 (Archive number)2020 (OAI)
Available from: 2021-05-05 Created: 2021-05-05 Last updated: 2022-04-19Bibliographically approved
Andersson, L., Karlsson, K., Johansson, P. & Almerud Österberg, S. (2020). I'm afraid! Children's experiences of being anesthetized. Pediatric Anaesthesia, 30(9), 998-1005
Open this publication in new window or tab >>I'm afraid! Children's experiences of being anesthetized
2020 (English)In: Pediatric Anaesthesia, ISSN 1155-5645, E-ISSN 1460-9592, Vol. 30, no 9, p. 998-1005Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction Children experience anesthetization as stressful, and many preoperative measures have been tested for reducing their anxiety. There is, however, little research about children's own experiences and thoughts about being anesthetized. Aims The aim of the present study was thus to explain and understand the meaning of being anesthetized as experienced by children. Methods A qualitative lifeworld hermeneutic approach was used. Data were collected through nonparticipant video observations, field notes, and interviews. The participants were children (n = 28) aged 4-13 years who required general elective minor surgery performed in four Swedish hospitals. Results The four interpreted themes describe the children's experiences of being anesthetized: Being powerless, Striving for control, Experiencing an ambiguous comprehensibility, and Seeking security. The children struggled with anxiety as a result of their inability to protect themselves from perceived external threats while being anesthetized. In order to meet their needs, it would be beneficial for them to receive appropriate information in a calm, supportive, and protective environment. Conclusion The reasons for children experiencing anxiety when being anesthetized are multifaceted, and this study highlights the importance of listening to each child's own voice and striving to create an individually adapted caring and safe environment with as much protection as possible.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
anesthesia, anxiety, child, experiences, lifeworld hermeneutic
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-97176 (URN)10.1111/pan.13931 (DOI)000542138100001 ()32463955 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85087131658 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-07-16 Created: 2020-07-16 Last updated: 2022-07-08Bibliographically approved
Almerud Österberg, S. & Rahmqvist Linnarsson, J. (2019). Akut omhändertagande (3ed.). In: Anna-Karin Edberg & Helle Wijk (Ed.), Omvårdnadens grunder: hälsa och ohälsa (pp. 189-214). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Akut omhändertagande
2019 (Swedish)In: Omvårdnadens grunder: hälsa och ohälsa / [ed] Anna-Karin Edberg & Helle Wijk, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019, 3, p. 189-214Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019 Edition: 3
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-90961 (URN)9789144123165 (ISBN)
Available from: 2020-01-16 Created: 2020-01-16 Last updated: 2020-01-16Bibliographically approved
Elmqvist, C. & Almerud Österberg, S. (Eds.). (2019). Akut omhändertagande av trauma: på skadeplats och akutmottagning (2ed.). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Akut omhändertagande av trauma: på skadeplats och akutmottagning
2019 (Swedish)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019. p. 205 Edition: 2
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-90951 (URN)9789144127613 (ISBN)
Note

Om boken:

Syftet med denna bok är att beskriva förutsättningarna för att ge ett gott omhändertagande i det initiala skedet efter en skadehändelse. I boken beskrivs de första timmarna från det att larmet om trafikolycka kommer in till alarmeringscentralen och till dess att samtliga drabbade omhändertagits på ett akutsjukhus.

Boken är skriven av sjuksköterskor, läkare och en psykolog med lång klinisk erfarenhet från akut omhändertagande. Personer från SOS Alarm, Polismyndigheten, Värends Räddningstjänst, Länsstyrelsen och Myndigheten för samhällsskydd och beredskap (MSB) medverkar också som författare.

Boken riktar sig främst till sjuksköterskestudenter, studenter vid polisutbildningen samt studerande vid utbildning till del- och heltidsbrandman. Boken kan med fördel även användas i specialistsjuksköterskeutbildningarna inom akutsjukvård samt andra utbildningar och kurser inom akutsjukvårdsområdet.

Available from: 2020-01-16 Created: 2020-01-16 Last updated: 2022-09-19Bibliographically approved
Qvistgaard, M., Lovebo, J. & Almerud Österberg, S. (2019). Intraoperative prevention of Surgical Site Infections as experienced by operating room nurses. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 14(1), 1-8, Article ID 1632109.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intraoperative prevention of Surgical Site Infections as experienced by operating room nurses
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 1-8, article id 1632109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: This study examines how OR nurses experience intraoperative prevention of SSIs. Introduction: Infections related to surgical procedures create both great patient suffering and high costs for society. Therefore, prevention of Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) should be a high priority for all surgical settings. All details of intraoperative care need to be investigated and evaluated to ensure best practices are evidence-based. Methods: This study uses the Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) approach, which is grounded in phenomenology. Participants were OR nurses with at least one year of clinical experience. In total, 15 participants from seven hospitals made contact and were included in this interview study. Results: Prevention of SSIs takes both head and hand. It requires long-term, continuous, and systematic work in several parallel processes, both intellectually and organisationally. The hierarchical tradition of the operating room is often ambiguous, shielded by its safe structures but still restricted by traditional patterns. Confident relations and resolute communication within the team generate favorable conditions for preventing SSIs. Conclusions: By setting up mutual platforms and forums for quality development, increasing legitimacy for OR nurses and establishing fixed teams, prevention of SSIs will continue to improve, ensuring the patients' safety during intraoperative care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Keywords
Intraoperative care, Operating room, Prevention, Surgical Site Infection, Surgical team
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-86967 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2019.1632109 (DOI)000473526500001 ()31256748 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85068214200 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-23 Created: 2019-07-23 Last updated: 2022-04-19Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2602-0101

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