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Publications (10 of 44) Show all publications
Lund, M. (2017). Climbing the Hill: Will Eisner's Heritage Fabrication and Comics Identity Politics In and Beyond The Dreamer (1986). In: Maahen Ahmed, Stéphanie Delneste, Jean-Louis Tilleuil (Ed.), Le status culturel de la bande dessinée - ambiguïtés ete évolutions: [ The cultural standing of comics - Ambiguities and changes ] (pp. 119-136). Louvain-la-Neuve: L'Harmattan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climbing the Hill: Will Eisner's Heritage Fabrication and Comics Identity Politics In and Beyond The Dreamer (1986)
2017 (English)In: Le status culturel de la bande dessinée - ambiguïtés ete évolutions: [ The cultural standing of comics - Ambiguities and changes ] / [ed] Maahen Ahmed, Stéphanie Delneste, Jean-Louis Tilleuil, Louvain-la-Neuve: L'Harmattan, 2017, p. 119-136Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Louvain-la-Neuve: L'Harmattan, 2017
National Category
Cultural Studies
Research subject
Humanities, Comparative literature; Humanities, Cultural Sociology; Humanities, English literature; Humanities, History; Humanities, Visual Culture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-59737 (URN)978-2-8061-0320-8 (ISBN)9782140027734 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-01-10 Created: 2017-01-10 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
Lund, M. (2017). ‘Every day is 9/11!’: Re-constructing Ground Zero in three US comics. Journal of Urban Cultural Studies, 4(1-2), 241-261
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘Every day is 9/11!’: Re-constructing Ground Zero in three US comics
2017 (English)In: Journal of Urban Cultural Studies, ISSN 2050-9790, E-ISSN 2050-9804, Vol. 4, no 1-2, p. 241-261Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article analyses three comics series: writer Brian K. Vaughan and artist Tony Harris’ Ex Machina (August 2004–August 2010); writer Brian Wood and artist Riccardo Burchielli’s DMZ (November 2005–February 2012); and writer Garth Ennis and artist Darick Robertson’s The Boys (October 2006–November 2012). Taking literary critic Laura Frost’s concept of ‘archifictions’ as its starting point, the article discusses how these series frame the September 11 attacks on New York and their aftermath, but its primary concern is with their engagement with the larger social ramifications of 9/11 and with the War on Terror, and with how this engagement is rooted in and centred on Ground Zero. It argues that this rooting allows these comics’ creators to critique post-9/11 US culture and foreign policy, but that it also, ultimately, serves to disarm the critique that each series voices in favour of closure through recourse to recuperative architecture.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Intellect Ltd., 2017
National Category
General Literature Studies
Research subject
Humanities, Comparative literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-76505 (URN)10.1386/jucs.4.1-2.241_1 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-06-28 Created: 2018-06-28 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
Lund, M. (2016). Book Review: Mariah Adin, The Brooklyn Thrill-Kill Gang and the Great Comic Book Scare of the 1950s. The Gotham Center for New York City History
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Book Review: Mariah Adin, The Brooklyn Thrill-Kill Gang and the Great Comic Book Scare of the 1950s
2016 (English)Other (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, pages
The Gotham Center for New York City History, 2016
National Category
Cultural Studies
Research subject
Humanities, History; Humanities, Comparative literature; Media Studies and Journalism, Media and Communication Science; Humanities, Visual Culture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-50402 (URN)
Note

Blogginlägg

Blog Post

Available from: 2016-03-09 Created: 2016-03-09 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
Lund, M. (2016). ‘Introducing the Sensational Black Panther!’: Fantastic Four #52–53, the Cold War, and Marvel’s Imagined Africa. Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 6(1), 1-21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘Introducing the Sensational Black Panther!’: Fantastic Four #52–53, the Cold War, and Marvel’s Imagined Africa
2016 (English)In: Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, ISSN 1560-5892, E-ISSN 2048-0792, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article discusses Fantastic Four #52–53 (July–August 1966), in which Black Panther, Marvel’s first black superhero, premiered. It argues that the character as he appeared in these issues is best read as an example of ‘white on black’ representation, or white images of blacks centered on white interests, filtered through Marvel’s then-prevalent Cold War focus. The article first looks at the Fantastic Four as Cold Warriors to contextualize Black Panther. It then goes on to look at how Wakanda, Black Panther’s tribe, and Klaw, the storyline’s villain, are configured in relation to this context, in order to highlight the importance in the story of Cold War conceptions of and fears about the process of decolonization that was taking place on the African continent. Finally, it argues that Black Panther is rhetorically ‘Americanized,’ to better fit with US self-conceptions and to alleviate worries about what Africa’s then-recent decolonization might mean for United States of America.

Keywords
Black Panther, Cold War, decolonization, Fantastic Four, representation
National Category
General Literature Studies
Research subject
Humanities, Comparative literature; Humanities, English literature; Humanities, History; Humanities, Visual Culture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-52640 (URN)10.16995/cg.80 (DOI)000382762100010 ()
Available from: 2016-05-24 Created: 2016-05-24 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
Lund, M. (2016). Persons of Mass Destruction: The War on Terror in Mark Millar's Ultimates Comic Books. Americana : The Journal of American Popular Culture, 15(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Persons of Mass Destruction: The War on Terror in Mark Millar's Ultimates Comic Books
2016 (English)In: Americana : The Journal of American Popular Culture, ISSN 1553-8931, E-ISSN 1553-8931, Vol. 15, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article presents a reading of how the comic book series Ultimates represented and critiqued the War on Terror.

At the beginning of the millennium, Marvel Comics launched its Ultimate Marvel line with Ultimate Spider-Man, the first of many reimagined versions of their most popular superheroes. The publisher’s intention was to update its characters for the new millennium and to win new readers, who might be intimidated by the dense continuity that Marvel’s comics were mired in, after decades of continuous publication. Among the revitalized properties was The Avengers, a superhero team originally introduced by writer Stan Lee and artist Jack Kirby, a legendary Marvel duo, in September 1963. The new Avengers series was  handed to Scottish writer Mark Millar who would shepherd it through over half a decade and turn it into a highly political warning through allegory, concerning American foreign policy.

This development did not come from nowhere. Shortly after the Ultimate line launched, the terrorist attacks on 9/11 occurred. As a result, three important changes in American society emerged: America entered a War on Terror, the government implemented policies and passed bills that were designed to institutionalize the calamity and state of emergency, and political rhetoric and media representation helped inspire a culture of fear and securitization (see Rozario). A new foreign policy was also introduced, which quickly became known as the “Bush Doctrine”; it centered on the US “prevent[ing] any nation or combination of nations from challenging its military preeminence” and stressed preemptive strikes, noting that the US would not wait until it had “absolute proof” of danger from weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) before striking (Herring 943-944). Millar used Ultimates to speak out against these ideas.

National Category
General Literature Studies
Research subject
Humanities, Comparative literature; Humanities, English literature; Humanities, Visual Culture; Humanities, History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-54663 (URN)
Available from: 2016-07-20 Created: 2016-07-20 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
Lund, M. (2016). Re-Constructing the Man of Steel: Superman 1938–1941, Jewish American History, and the Invention of the Jewish–Comics Connection. New York: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Re-Constructing the Man of Steel: Superman 1938–1941, Jewish American History, and the Invention of the Jewish–Comics Connection
2016 (English)Book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In Re-Constructing the Man of Steel, Martin Lund challenges contemporary claims about the original Superman’s supposed Jewishness and offers a critical re-reading of the earliest Superman comics. Engaging in critical dialogue with extant writing on the subject, Lund argues that much of recent popular and scholarly writing on Superman as a Jewish character is a product of the ethnic revival, rather than critical investigations of the past, and as such does not stand up to historical scrutiny. In place of these readings, this book offers a new understanding of the Superman created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster in the mid-1930s, presenting him as an authentically Jewish American character in his own time, for good and ill.

On the way to this conclusion, this book questions many popular claims about Superman, including that he is a golem, a Moses-figure, or has a Hebrew name. In place of such notions, Lund offers contextual readings of Superman as he first appeared, touching on, among other ideas, Jewish American affinities with the Roosevelt White House, the whitening effects of popular culture, Jewish gender stereotypes, and the struggles faced by Jewish Americans during the historical peak of American anti-Semitism.

In this book, Lund makes a call to stem the diffusion of myth into accepted truth, stressing the importance of contextualizing the Jewish heritage of the creators of Superman. By critically taking into account historical understandings of Jewishness and the comics’ creative contexts, this book challenges reigning assumptions about Superman and other superheroes’ cultural roles, not only for the benefit of Jewish studies, but for American, Cultural, and Comics studies as a whole.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. p. 215
Series
Contemporary Religion and Popular Culture
Keywords
comics, American Judaism, history, Great Depression, anti-Semitism, superheroes, popular culture, visual culture, intertextuality, whiteness
National Category
History
Research subject
Humanities, Art science; Humanities, Comparative literature; Humanities, English literature; Humanities, History; Humanities, Study of Religions; Humanities, Visual Culture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-58244 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-42960-1 (DOI)978-3-319-42960-1 (ISBN)978-3-319-42959-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-11-22 Created: 2016-11-22 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
Ahmed, M. & Lund, M. (2016). ‘We’re all Avengers now’: Community-building, civil religion and nominal multiculturalism in Marvel Comics’ Fear Itself. European Journal of American Culture, 35(2), 77-95
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘We’re all Avengers now’: Community-building, civil religion and nominal multiculturalism in Marvel Comics’ Fear Itself
2016 (English)In: European Journal of American Culture, ISSN 1466-0407, E-ISSN 1758-9118, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 77-95Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article discusses Marvel Comics’ 2011 crossover ‘event’ ‘Fear Itself’. It suggests that the event argues for national unity in a time of crisis by mobilizing America’s self-definition as a multicultural nation as well as civil religion. The article discusses ‘Fear Itself’s’ attempted construction of national myth through looking at the way it represents the media, US multiculturalism (in a generalized form that nominally includes non-white groups while frequently failing to account for them) and ‘sacralized’ civil religious aspects of US history. Especially salient in this connection is the event’s engagement with the Roosevelt years. In doing so, it is argued, ‘Fear Itself’ presents an Americanness that relies on an idealized and nostalgic notion of the so-called ‘Greatest Generation’, a tightly knit, self-sacrificing civil society that supposedly came into being during that period.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Intellect Ltd., 2016
Keywords
comics, superheroes, multiculturalism, civil religion, Greatest Generation, community-building
National Category
History
Research subject
Humanities, Art science; Humanities, Comparative literature; Humanities, Cultural Sociology; Humanities, English literature; Humanities, History; Humanities, Study of Religions; Humanities, Visual Culture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-53876 (URN)10.1386/ejac.35.2.77_1 (DOI)2-s2.0-84975463529 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-06-19 Created: 2016-06-19 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Lund, M. (2015). “[A] matter of SAVED or LOST”: difference, salvation, and subjection in Chick tracts (1ed.). In: Rikke Platz Cortsen, Erin La Cour and Anne Magnussen (Ed.), Comics and power: representing and questioning culture, subjects and communities (pp. 173-192). Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“[A] matter of SAVED or LOST”: difference, salvation, and subjection in Chick tracts
2015 (English)In: Comics and power: representing and questioning culture, subjects and communities / [ed] Rikke Platz Cortsen, Erin La Cour and Anne Magnussen, Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2015, 1, p. 173-192Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2015 Edition: 1
National Category
History of Religions
Research subject
Humanities, Study of Religions; Media Studies and Journalism; Humanities, English literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-40152 (URN)978-1-4438-7086-3 (ISBN)1-4438-7086-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-02-14 Created: 2015-02-14 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
Kontturi, K., Lund, M., Romu, L. & Strömberg, F. (2015). Editorial: From the Land of the Midnight Sun: Nordic History and Cultural Memory in Comics. SJoCA Scandinavian Journal of Comic Art, 2(1), 1-5
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial: From the Land of the Midnight Sun: Nordic History and Cultural Memory in Comics
2015 (English)In: SJoCA Scandinavian Journal of Comic Art, ISSN 2001-3620, E-ISSN 2001-3620, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 1-5Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Scandinavian Journal of Comic Art, 2015
National Category
General Literature Studies Cultural Studies
Research subject
Humanities, Comparative literature; Humanities, History; Humanities, Art science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-47222 (URN)
Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
Lund, M. (2015). J. Michael Straczynski’s Highway to Hell: Voyages into the Midnight Nation. In: Sixth International Graphic Novel and Comics Conference / Ninth International Bande Dessinée Society Conference: . Paper presented at Sixth International Graphic Novel and Comics Conference / Ninth International Bande Dessinée Society Conference.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>J. Michael Straczynski’s Highway to Hell: Voyages into the Midnight Nation
2015 (English)In: Sixth International Graphic Novel and Comics Conference / Ninth International Bande Dessinée Society Conference, 2015Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Cultural Studies
Research subject
Humanities, Comparative literature; Humanities, English literature; Humanities, History; Humanities, Visual Culture; Humanities, Study of Religions
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-49894 (URN)
Conference
Sixth International Graphic Novel and Comics Conference / Ninth International Bande Dessinée Society Conference
Available from: 2016-02-23 Created: 2016-02-23 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7680-9402

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