lnu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 36) Show all publications
Bais, A. F., Lucas, R. M., Bornman, J. F., Williamson, C. E., Sulzberger, B., Austin, A. T., . . . Heikkila, A. M. (2018). Environmental effects of ozone depletion, UV radiation and interactions with climate change: UNEP Environmental Effects Assessment Panel, update 2017. Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences, 17(2), 127-179
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental effects of ozone depletion, UV radiation and interactions with climate change: UNEP Environmental Effects Assessment Panel, update 2017
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences, ISSN 1474-905X, E-ISSN 1474-9092, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 127-179Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Environmental Effects Assessment Panel (EEAP) is one of three Panels of experts that inform the Parties to the Montreal Protocol. The EEAP focuses on the effects of UV radiation on human health, terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, air quality, and materials, as well as on the interactive effects of UV radiation and global climate change. When considering the effects of climate change, it has become clear that processes resulting in changes in stratospheric ozone are more complex than previously held. Because of the Montreal Protocol, there are now indications of the beginnings of a recovery of stratospheric ozone, although the time required to reach levels like those before the 1960s is still uncertain, particularly as the effects of stratospheric ozone on climate change and vice versa, are not yet fully understood. Some regions will likely receive enhanced levels of UV radiation, while other areas will likely experience a reduction in UV radiation as ozone- and climate-driven changes affect the amounts of UV radiation reaching the Earth's surface. Like the other Panels, the EEAP produces detailed Quadrennial Reports every four years; the most recent was published as a series of seven papers in 2015 (Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2015, 14, 1-184). In the years in between, the EEAP produces less detailed and shorter Update Reports of recent and relevant scientific findings. The most recent of these was for 2016 (Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2017, 16, 107-145). The present 2017 Update Report assesses some of the highlights and new insights about the interactive nature of the direct and indirect effects of UV radiation, atmospheric processes, and climate change. A full 2018 Quadrennial Assessment, will be made available in 2018/2019.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry, 2018
National Category
Climate Research Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-71223 (URN)10.1039/c7pp90043k (DOI)000425174200001 ()29404558 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-02 Created: 2018-03-02 Last updated: 2018-03-02Bibliographically approved
Heuschele, J., Ekvall, M. T., Bianco, G., Hylander, S. & Hansson, L.-A. (2017). Context-dependent individual behavioral consistency in Daphnia. Ecosphere, 8(2), Article ID e01679.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Context-dependent individual behavioral consistency in Daphnia
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Ecosphere, ISSN 2150-8925, E-ISSN 2150-8925, Vol. 8, no 2, article id e01679Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The understanding of consistent individual differences in behavior, often termed “personality,” for adapting and coping with threats and novel environmental conditions has advanced considerably during the last decade. However, advancements are almost exclusively associated with higher-order animals, whereas studies focusing on smaller aquatic organisms are still rare. Here, we show individual differences in the swimming behavior of Daphnia magna, a clonal freshwater invertebrate, before, during, and after being exposed to a lethal threat, ultraviolet radiation (UVR). We show consistency in swimming velocity among both mothers and daughters of D. magna in a neutral environment, whereas this pattern breaks down when exposed to UVR. Our study also, for the first time, illustrates how the ontogenetic development in swimming and refuge-seeking behavior of young individuals eventually approaches that of adults. Overall, we show that aquatic invertebrates are far from being identical robots, but instead they show considerable individual differences in behavior that can be attributed to both ontogenetic development and individual consistency. Our study also demonstrates, for the first time, that behavioral consistency and repeatability, that is, something resembling “personality,” is context and state dependent in this zooplankter taxa.

Keywords
animal personality, behavioral type, Daphnia, UV radiation, zooplankton
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-61179 (URN)10.1002/ecs2.1679 (DOI)000397091300015 ()
Projects
EcoChange
Available from: 2017-03-08 Created: 2017-03-08 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved
Broman, E., Sachpazidou, V., Dopson, M. & Hylander, S. (2017). Diatoms dominate the eukaryotic metatranscriptome during spring in coastal 'dead zone' sediments. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, 284(1864), Article ID 20171617.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diatoms dominate the eukaryotic metatranscriptome during spring in coastal 'dead zone' sediments
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 284, no 1864, article id 20171617Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An important characteristic of marine sediments is the oxygen concentration that affects many central metabolic processes. There has been a widespread increase in hypoxia in coastal systems (referred to as 'dead zones') mainly caused by eutrophication. Hence, it is central to understand the metabolism and ecology of eukaryotic life in sediments during changing oxygen conditions. Therefore, we sampled coastal 'dead zone' Baltic Sea sediment during autumn and spring, and analysed the eukaryotic metatranscriptome from field samples and after incubation in the dark under oxic or anoxic conditions. Bacillariophyta (diatoms) dominated the eukaryotic metatranscriptome in spring and were also abundant during autumn. A large fraction of the diatom RNA reads was associated with the photosystems suggesting a constitutive expression in darkness. Microscope observation showed intact diatom cells and these would, if hatched, represent a significant part of the pelagic phytoplankton biomass. Oxygenation did not significantly change the relative proportion of diatoms nor resulted in any major shifts in metabolic 'signatures'. By contrast, diatoms rapidly responded when exposed to light suggesting that light is limiting diatom development in hypoxic sediments. Hence, it is suggested that diatoms in hypoxic sediments are on 'standby' to exploit the environment if they reach suitable habitats.

Keywords
diatoms, sediment, oxygen, anoxia, metatranscriptomics
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-68552 (URN)10.1098/rspb.2017.1617 (DOI)000412553400005 ()
Projects
EcoChange
Funder
Ecosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Available from: 2017-11-01 Created: 2017-11-01 Last updated: 2018-04-24Bibliographically approved
Andrady, A., Aucamp, P. J., Austin, A. T., Bais, A. F., Ballare, C. L., Barnes, P. W., . . . Zepp, R. G. (2017). Environmental effects of ozone depletion and its interactions with climate change: Progress report, 2016. Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences, 16(2), 107-145
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental effects of ozone depletion and its interactions with climate change: Progress report, 2016
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences, ISSN 1474-905X, E-ISSN 1474-9092, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 107-145Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Parties to the Montreal Protocol are informed by three Panels of experts. One of these is the Environmental Effects Assessment Panel (EEAP), which deals with two focal issues. The first focus is the effects of UV radiation on human health, animals, plants, biogeochemistry, air quality, and materials. The second focus is on interactions between UV radiation and global climate change and how these may affect humans and the environment. When considering the effects of climate change, it has become clear that processes resulting in changes in stratospheric ozone are more complex than previously believed. As a result of this, human health and environmental issues will be longer-lasting and more regionally variable. Like the other Panels, the EEAP produces a detailed report every four years; the most recent was published as a series of seven papers in 2015 (Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2015, 14, 1-184). In the years in between, the EEAP produces less detailed and shorter Progress Reports of the relevant scientific findings. The most recent of these was for 2015 (Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2016, 15, 141-147). The present Progress Report for 2016 assesses some of the highlights and new insights with regard to the interactive nature of the direct and indirect effects of UV radiation, atmospheric processes, and climate change. The more detailed Quadrennial Assessment will bemade available in 2018.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry, 2017
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-67093 (URN)10.1039/c7pp90001e (DOI)000395697000001 ()28124708 (PubMedID)
Projects
EcoChange
Available from: 2017-07-26 Created: 2017-07-26 Last updated: 2018-04-24Bibliographically approved
Neuheimer, A. B., Hartvig, M., Hylander, S., Kiorboe, T., Olsson, K. H., Saimont, J. & Andersen, K. H. (2016). Adult and offspring size in the ocean: a database of size metrics and conversion factors. John Wiley & Sons
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adult and offspring size in the ocean: a database of size metrics and conversion factors
Show others...
2016 (English)Data set
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this dataset was to compile adult and offspring size estimates for marine organisms. Adult and offspring size estimates of 408 species were compiled from the literature covering >17 orders of magnitude in body mass and including Cephalopoda (ink fish), Cnidaria (“jelly” fish), Crustaceans, Ctenophora (comb jellies), Elasmobranchii (cartilaginous fish), Mammalia (mammals), Sagittoidea (arrow worms) and Teleost (i.e., Actinopterygii, bony fish). Individual size estimates were converted to standardized size estimates (carbon weight, g) to allow for among-group comparisons. This required a number of size estimates to be converted and a compilation of conversion factors obtained from the literature are also presented.

Place, publisher, year
John Wiley & Sons, 2016
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-59429 (URN)10.1890/15-1261.1 (DOI)
Projects
EcoChange
Note

Published in Ecology, 2016, 97(4):1083

The complete data sets corresponding to abstracts published in the Data Papers section in the journal are published electronically as Supporting Information in the online version of this article at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1890/15-1261.1/suppinfo

Available from: 2016-12-20 Created: 2016-12-20 Last updated: 2018-04-24Bibliographically approved
Andersen, K. H., Berge, T., Goncalves, R. J., Hartvig, M., Heuschele, J., Hylander, S., . . . Kiorboe, T. (2016). Characteristic Sizes of Life in the Oceans, from Bacteria to Whales. Annual Review of Marine Science, 8, 217-241
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characteristic Sizes of Life in the Oceans, from Bacteria to Whales
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Annual Review of Marine Science, ISSN 1941-1405, E-ISSN 1941-0611, Vol. 8, p. 217-241Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The size of an individual organism is a key trait to characterize its physiology and feeding ecology. Size-based scaling laws may have a limited size range of validity or undergo a transition from one scaling exponent to another at some characteristic size. We collate and review data on size-based scaling laws for resource acquisition, mobility, sensory range, and progeny size for all pelagic marine life, from bacteria to whales. Further, we review and develop simple theoretical arguments for observed scaling laws and the characteristic sizes of a change or breakdown of power laws. We divide life in the ocean into seven major realms based on trophic strategy, physiology, and life history strategy. Such a categorization represents a move away from a taxonomically oriented description toward a trait-based description of life in the oceans. Finally, we discuss life forms that transgress the simple size-based rules and identify unanswered questions.

Keywords
body size, metabolism, allometric scaling, plankton, mixotrophy, fish, whales
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-49730 (URN)10.1146/annurev-marine-122414-034144 (DOI)000368369200010 ()26163011 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84953223124 (Scopus ID)978-0-8243-4508-2 (ISBN)
Projects
EcoChange
Available from: 2016-02-12 Created: 2016-02-12 Last updated: 2018-04-24Bibliographically approved
Brüsin, M., Svensson, P. A. & Hylander, S. (2016). Individual changes in zooplankton pigmentation in relation to ultraviolet radiation and predator cues. Limnology and Oceanography, 61(4), 1337-1344
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individual changes in zooplankton pigmentation in relation to ultraviolet radiation and predator cues
2016 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, E-ISSN 1939-5590, Vol. 61, no 4, p. 1337-1344Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Copepods are common crustaceans in aquatic systems and one of the most important producers of carotenoidastaxanthin pigments, which can enhance the animals’ resistance against potentially damaging ultraviolet radiation (UVR), but at the same time, increases the risk of fish predation. Previous studies have demonstrated that copepods have different pigmentation levels matching the current threat level in terms of UVR and fish occurrence. However, these other studies have quantified population-levels changes in pigmentation, making it difficult to disentangle the role of individual phenotypic colour changes from that of selection.We quantified carotenoid-based pigmentation with colorimetric methods, which enabled us to track changes within individual copepods. Two species of copepods, Diaptomus castor and Eudiaptomus gracilis, were exposed to high and low UVR and fish cues in a factorial design. L*a*b* colour values (CIE; CommissionInternational de l’Eclairage) were extracted from digital photographs of each copepod and used as proxies for carotenoid concentration. Our results showed that individual copepods significantly changed their pigmentation in response to both UVR and fish cues within a period of 2 weeks. However, the responses differed between sexes and between adults and juveniles. UVR effects were present in all life-stages whereas fish effects were only detected in juveniles, with largest responses in D. castor. This confirms that carotenoid pigmentation is a phenotypically plastic trait, and highlights that strategies for trading off risks of UVR and predation differ between males and females as well as between life-stages.

National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-51844 (URN)10.1002/lno.10303 (DOI)000383622900014 ()2-s2.0-84969915314 (Scopus ID)
Projects
EcoChange
Available from: 2016-04-01 Created: 2016-04-01 Last updated: 2018-04-24Bibliographically approved
Hansson, L.-A., Bianco, G., Ekvall, M., Heuschele, J., Hylander, S. & Yang, X. (2016). Instantaneous threat escape and differentiated refuge demand among zooplankton taxa. Ecology, 97(2), 279-285
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Instantaneous threat escape and differentiated refuge demand among zooplankton taxa
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Ecology, ISSN 0012-9658, E-ISSN 1939-9170, Vol. 97, no 2, p. 279-285Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most animals, including aquatic crustacean zooplankton, perform strong avoidance movements when exposed to a threat, such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR). We here show that the genera Daphnia and Bosmina instantly adjust their vertical position in the water in accordance with the present UVR threat, i.e., seek refuge in deeper waters, whereas other taxa show less response to the threat. Moreover, Daphnia repeatedly respond to UVR pulses, suggesting that they spend more energy on movement than more stationary taxa, for example, during days with fluctuating cloud cover, illustrating nonlethal effects in avoiding UVR threat. Accordingly, we also show that the taxa with the most contrasting behavioral responses differ considerably in photoprotection, suggesting different morphological and behavioral strategies in handling the UVR threat. In a broader context, our studies on individual and taxa specific responses to UVR provide insights into observed spatial and temporal distribution in natural ecosystems.

Keywords
Daphnia, migration, movement, Polyphemus, ultraviolet radiation, zooplankton, refuge, threat response
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-51592 (URN)10.1890/15-1014.1 (DOI)000371439800001 ()2-s2.0-84960935021 (Scopus ID)
Projects
EcoChange
Available from: 2016-03-30 Created: 2016-03-30 Last updated: 2018-04-24Bibliographically approved
Neuheimer, A. B., Hartvig, M., Heuschele, J., Hylander, S., Kiorboe, T., Olsson, K. H., . . . Andersen, K. H. (2015). Adult and offspring size in the ocean over 17 orders of magnitude follows two life history strategies. Ecology, 96(12), 3303-3311
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adult and offspring size in the ocean over 17 orders of magnitude follows two life history strategies
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Ecology, ISSN 0012-9658, E-ISSN 1939-9170, Vol. 96, no 12, p. 3303-3311Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Explaining variability in offspring vs. adult size among groups is a necessary step to determine the evolutionary and environmental constraints shaping variability in life history strategies. This is of particularly interest for life in the ocean where a diversity of offspring development strategies is observed along with variability in physical and biological forcing factors in space and time. We compiled adult and offspring size for 408 pelagic marine species covering >17 orders of magnitude in body mass including Cephalopoda, Cnidaria, Crustaceans, Ctenophora, Elasmobranchii, Mammalia, Sagittoidea, and Teleost. We find marine life following one of two distinct strategies, with offspring size being either proportional to adult size (e.g. Crustaceans, Euratatoria, Elasmobranchii and Mammalia) or invariant with adult size (e.g. Cephalopoda, Cnidaria, Sagittoidea, Teleosts and possibly Ctenophora). We discuss where these two strategies occur and how these patterns (along with the relative size of the offspring) may be shaped by physical and biological constraints in the organism's environment. This adaptive environment along with the evolutionary history of the different groups shape observed life history strategies and possible group-specific responses to changing environmental conditions (e.g. production and distribution).

Keywords
Adult size, Carbon mass, Evolution, Life history, Marine animals, Offspring size, Reproductive strategy
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-45742 (URN)10.1890/14-2491.1 (DOI)000367287900017 ()
Available from: 2015-08-17 Created: 2015-08-17 Last updated: 2018-04-24Bibliographically approved
Hylander, S., Kiørboe, T., Snoeijs, P., Sommaruga, R. & Nielsen, T. G. (2015). Concentrations of sunscreens and antioxidant pigments in Arctic Calanus spp. in relation to ice cover, ultraviolet radiation, and the phytoplankton spring bloom. Limnology and Oceanography, 60, 2197-2206
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Concentrations of sunscreens and antioxidant pigments in Arctic Calanus spp. in relation to ice cover, ultraviolet radiation, and the phytoplankton spring bloom
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, E-ISSN 1939-5590, Vol. 60, p. 2197-2206Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Arctic zooplankton ascend to shallow depths during spring to graze on the yearly occurring phytoplankton bloom. However, in surface waters they are exposed to detrimental ultraviolet radiation (UVR) levels. Here, we quantified concentrations of substances known to have UVR-protective functions, namely mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) and the carotenoid astaxanthin, from March to May in Calanus finmarchicus, Calanus glacialis and Calanus hyperboreus. Ice cover was 100% in the beginning of March, started to break up during April and was gone by the end of May. UVR-exposure in the water column was tightly linked to the ice conditions and water UVR-transparency was up to 6 m (depth where 1% radiation remains). Concentrations of MAAs in C. finmarchicus and C. glacialis increased sharply during ice break-up and peaked concurrently with maximum chlorophyll a (Chl a) levels. MAA-concentrations in C. hyperboreus increased later in accordance with its later arrival to the surface. The concentration of astaxanthin increased in all three species over time but there was no synchrony with ice conditions or the phytoplankton bloom. Even though only the upper 6 m of the water column was affected by UV-radiation, MAAs in the copepods were tightly correlated to the UV-threat. Hence, changes in ice cover are projected to have a large impact on the UVR-exposure of zooplankton emphasizing the importance of the timing of zooplankton ascent from deep waters in relation to the phytoplankton bloom and the ice break-up.

National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-45743 (URN)10.1002/lno.10194 (DOI)000363888400025 ()2-s2.0-84945915191 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-08-17 Created: 2015-08-17 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3740-5998

Search in DiVA

Show all publications