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Tågerud, Sven
Publications (10 of 76) Show all publications
Tågerud, S. (2019). Patienten bör inte behöva betala för betydelsefulla test. Läkartidningen, 116(16-17)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patienten bör inte behöva betala för betydelsefulla test
2019 (English)In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 116, no 16-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Swedish Medical Association, 2019
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-86427 (URN)2-s2.0-85065251724 (Scopus ID)
Note

Export Date: 22 May 2019; Article

Available from: 2019-07-11 Created: 2019-07-11 Last updated: 2019-07-11
Fjällström, A.-K., Norrby, M. & Tågerud, S. (2015). Expression and phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4-gamma (eIF4G) in denervated atrophic and hypertrophic mouse skeletal muscle. Cell Biology International, 39(4), 496-501
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expression and phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4-gamma (eIF4G) in denervated atrophic and hypertrophic mouse skeletal muscle
2015 (English)In: Cell Biology International, ISSN 1065-6995, E-ISSN 1095-8355, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 496-501Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4-gamma (eIF4G) is important for the initiation of protein synthesis and phosphorylation on S1108 regulates this function of eIF4G. Thus, increased phosphorylation has been reported in conditions associated with increased protein synthesis such as meal feeding and insulin/IGF-1 treatment whereas decreased phosphorylation occurs following starvation, dexamethasone treatment, in sepsis and in atrophic denervated hind-limb muscle. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that S1108 phosphorylation of eIF4G is differentially affected in denervated atrophic hind-limb muscles and denervated hypertrophic hemidiaphragm muscle. Protein expression and phosphorylation in innervated and 6-days denervated atrophic hind-limb muscles (pooled gastrocnemius and soleus) and hypertrophic hemidiaphragms were studied semi-quantitatively using Western blots. Total expression of eIF4G did not change in denervated hind-limb muscles but increased about 77% in denervated hemidiaphragm. S1108 phosphorylated eIF4G decreased about 64% in denervated hind-limb muscles but increased about 1.3-fold in denervated hemidiaphragm. The ratio of S1108 phosphorylated eIF4G to total eIF4G decreased about 60% in denervated hind-limb muscles but no statistically significant change was observed in denervated hemidiaphragm. The differential effect of denervation on eIF4G expression and S1108 phosphorylation in hemidiaphragm (hypertrophic) and hind-limb muscle (atrophic) may represent a regulatory mechanism that helps clarify the differential response of these muscles following denervation.

National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Natural Science, Biomedical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-37958 (URN)10.1002/cbin.10402 (DOI)000351678000017 ()25623635 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84925292774 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-10-31 Created: 2014-10-31 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Fjällström, A.-K., Evertsson, K., Norrby, M. & Tågerud, S. (2014). Forkhead box O1 and muscle RING finger 1protein expression in atrophic and hypertrophicdenervated mouse skeletal muscle. Journal of Molecular Signaling, 9, Article ID 9.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Forkhead box O1 and muscle RING finger 1protein expression in atrophic and hypertrophicdenervated mouse skeletal muscle
2014 (English)In: Journal of Molecular Signaling, ISSN 1750-2187, E-ISSN 1750-2187, Vol. 9, article id 9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Forkhead box O (FoxO) transcription factors and E3 ubiquitin ligases such as Muscle RING finger 1 (MuRF1) are believed to participate in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass. The function of FoxO transcription factors is regulated by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and acetylation. In the present study FoxO1 protein expression, phosphorylation and acetylation as well as MuRF1 protein expression, were examined in atrophic and hypertrophic denervated skeletal muscle. Methods: Protein expression, phosphorylation and acetylation were studied semi-quantitatively using Western blots. Muscles studied were 6-days denervated mouse hind-limb muscles (anterior tibial as well as pooled gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, all atrophic), 6-days denervated mouse hemidiaphragm muscles (hypertrophic) and innervated control muscles. Total muscle homogenates were used as well as separated nuclear and cytosolic fractions of innervated and 6-days denervated anterior tibial and hemidiaphragm muscles. Results: Expression of FoxO1 and MuRF1 proteins increased 0.3-3.7-fold in all 6-days denervated muscles studied, atrophic as well as hypertrophic. Phosphorylation of FoxO1 at S256 increased about 0.8-1-fold after denervation in pooled gastrocnemius and soleus muscles and in hemidiaphragm but not in unfractionated anterior tibial muscle. A small (0.2-fold) but statistically significant increase in FoxO1 phosphorylation was, however, observed in cytosolic fractions of denervated anterior tibial muscle. A statistically significant increase in FoxO1 acetylation (0.8-fold) was observed only in denervated anterior tibial muscle. Increases in total FoxO1 and in phosphorylated FoxO1 were only seen in cytosolic fractions of denervated atrophic anterior tibial muscle whereas in denervated hypertrophic hemidiaphragm both total FoxO1 and phosphorylated FoxO1 increased in cytosolic as well as in nuclear fractions. MuRF1 protein expression increased in cytosolic as well as in nuclear fractions of both denervated atrophic anterior tibial muscle and denervated hypertrophic hemidiaphragm muscle. Conclusions: Increased expression of FoxO1 and MuRF1 in denervated muscles (atrophic as well as hypertrophic) suggests that these proteins participate in the tissue remodelling occurring after denervation. The effect of denervation on the level of phosphorylated and acetylated FoxO1 differed in the muscles studied and may be related to differences in fiber type composition of the muscles.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2014
Keywords
Acetylation, Atrophy, Denervation, Cytosolic fraction, Forkhead box O, Hypertrophy, MuRF1, Nuclear fraction, Phosphorylation, Skeletal muscle
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Natural Science, Biomedical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-37669 (URN)10.1186/1750-2187-9-9 (DOI)2-s2.0-84907392088 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-10-15 Created: 2014-10-15 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Evertsson, K., Fjällström, A.-K., Norrby, M. & Tågerud, S. (2014). p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2) signaling in atrophic and hypertrophic denervated mouse skeletal muscle. Journal of Molecular Signaling, 9(2)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2) signaling in atrophic and hypertrophic denervated mouse skeletal muscle
2014 (English)In: Journal of Molecular Signaling, ISSN 1750-2187, E-ISSN 1750-2187, Vol. 9, no 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase has been implicated in both skeletal muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. T317 phosphorylation of the p38 substrate mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2) correlates with muscle weight in atrophic and hypertrophic denervated muscle and may influence the nuclear and cytoplasmic distribution of p38 and/or MK2. The present study investigates expression and phosphorylation of p38, MK2 and related proteins in cytosolic and nuclear fractions from atrophic and hypertrophic 6-days denervated skeletal muscles compared to innervated controls.

METHODS: Expression and phosphorylation of p38, MK2, Hsp25 (heat shock protein25rodent/27human, Hsp25/27) and Hsp70 protein expression were studied semi-quantitatively using Western blots with separated nuclear and cytosolic fractions from innervated and denervated hypertrophic hemidiaphragm and atrophic anterior tibial muscles. Unfractionated innervated and denervated atrophic pooled gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were also studied.

RESULTS: No support was obtained for a differential nuclear/cytosolic localization of p38 or MK2 in denervated hypertrophic and atrophic muscle. The differential effect of denervation on T317 phosphorylation of MK2 in denervated hypertrophic and atrophic muscle was not reflected in p38 phosphorylation nor in the phosphorylation of the MK2 substrate Hsp25. Hsp25 phosphorylation increased 3-30-fold in all denervated muscles studied. The expression of Hsp70 increased 3-5-fold only in denervated hypertrophic muscles.

CONCLUSIONS: The study confirms a differential response of MK2 T317 phosphorylation in denervated hypertrophic and atrophic muscles and suggests that Hsp70 may be important for this. Increased Hsp25 phosphorylation in all denervated muscles studied indicates a role for factors other than MK2 in the regulation of this phosphorylation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2014
National Category
Cell Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-37957 (URN)10.1186/1750-2187-9-2 (DOI)24629011 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84899065573 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-10-31 Created: 2014-10-31 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Semark, B., Engström, S., Brudin, L., Tågerud, S., Fredlund, K., Borgquist, L. & Petersson, G. (2013). Factors influencing the prescription of drugs of different price levels. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, 22(3), 286-293
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors influencing the prescription of drugs of different price levels
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2013 (English)In: Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, ISSN 1053-8569, E-ISSN 1099-1557, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 286-293Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose Socioeconomic factors have been suggested to influence the prescribing of newer and more expensive drugs. In the present study, individual and health care provider factors were studied in relation to the prevalence of differently priced drugs. Methods Register data for dispensed drugs were retrieved for 18486 individuals in a county council in Sweden. The prevalence of dispensed drugs was combined with data for the individual's gender, age, education, income, foreign background, and type of caregiver. For each of the diagnostic groups (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD], depression, diabetes, and osteoporosis), selected drugs were dichotomized into cost categories, lower and higher price levels. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were performed using cost category as the dependent variable and the individual and provider factors as independent variables. Results In all four diagnostic groups, differences were observed in the prescription of drugs of lower and higher price levels with regard to the different factors studied. Age and gender affected the prescription of drugs of lower and higher price levels more generally, except for gender in the osteoporosis group. Income, education, foreign background, and type of caregiver affected prescribing patterns but in different ways for the different diagnostic groups. Conclusions Certain individual and provider factors appear to influence the prescribing of drugs of different price levels. Because the average price for the cheaper drugs versus more costly drugs in each diagnostic group was between 19% and 69%, there is a risk that factors other than medical needs are influencing the choice of drug. Copyright (c) 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Keywords
drug prescriptions, socioeconomic, education, income, caregivers, cost-effectiveness, pharmacoepidemiology
National Category
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Biomedical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-25221 (URN)10.1002/pds.3402 (DOI)000315651200009 ()2-s2.0-84874531284 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-04-10 Created: 2013-04-05 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Norrby, M., Evertsson, K., Fjällström, A.-K., Svensson, A. & Tågerud, S. (2012). Akt (protein kinase B) isoform phosphorylation and signaling downstream of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) in denervated atrophic and hypertrophic mouse skeletal muscle.. Journal of Molecular Signaling, 7(June), Article ID: 7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Akt (protein kinase B) isoform phosphorylation and signaling downstream of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) in denervated atrophic and hypertrophic mouse skeletal muscle.
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2012 (English)In: Journal of Molecular Signaling, ISSN 1750-2187, E-ISSN 1750-2187, Vol. 7, no June, p. Article ID: 7-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The present study examines the hypothesis that Akt (protein kinase B)/mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signaling is increased in hypertrophic and decreased in atrophic denervated muscle. Protein expression and phosphorylation of Akt1, Akt2, glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta), eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4EBP1), 70 kD ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K1) and ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) were examined in six-days denervated mouse anterior tibial (atrophic) and hemidiaphragm (hypertrophic) muscles. RESULTS: In denervated hypertrophic muscle expression of total Akt1, Akt2, GSK-3beta, p70S6K1 and rpS6 proteins increased 2-10 fold whereas total 4EBP1 protein remained unaltered. In denervated atrophic muscle Akt1 and Akt2 total protein increased 2-16 fold. A small increase in expression of total rpS6 protein was also observed with no apparent changes in levels of total GSK-3beta, 4EBP1 or p70S6K1 proteins. The level of phosphorylated proteins increased 3-13 fold for all the proteins in hypertrophic denervated muscle. No significant changes in phosphorylated Akt1 or GSK-3beta were detected in atrophic denervated muscle. The phosphorylation levels of Akt2, 4EBP1, p70S6K1 and rpS6 were increased 2-18 fold in atrophic denervated muscle. CONCLUSIONS: The results are consistent with increased Akt/mTOR signaling in hypertrophic skeletal muscle. Decreased levels of phosphorylated Akt (S473/S474) were not observed in denervated atrophic muscle and results downstream of mTOR indicate increased protein synthesis in denervated atrophic anterior tibial muscle as well as in denervated hypertrophic hemidiaphragm muscle. Increased protein degradation, rather than decreased protein synthesis, is likely to be responsible for the loss of muscle mass in denervated atrophic muscles.

National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology Cell Biology Neurosciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Biomedical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-20341 (URN)10.1186/1750-2187-7-7 (DOI)22657251 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84861707979 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-06-21 Created: 2012-06-21 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Ekman, E., Petersson, G., Tågerud, S. & Bäckström, M. (2012). Awareness among nurses about reporting of adverse drug reactions in Sweden. Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety, 4, 61-66
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Awareness among nurses about reporting of adverse drug reactions in Sweden
2012 (English)In: Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety, ISSN 1179-1365, E-ISSN 1179-1365, Vol. 4, p. 61-66Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate awareness among nurses regarding their new role as reporters of adverse drug reactions in Sweden and factors that may influence reporting by nurses.

Methods: In 2007, all nurses were included in the adverse drug reaction reporting scheme in Sweden. A questionnaire was sent to 753 randomly selected nurses in September 2010.

Results: Of the 453 (60%) responding nurses, 265 (58%) were aware that nurses were included in the reporting of adverse drug reactions. Sixty-one nurses (14%) stated that they had reported an adverse drug reaction. Fifteen percent (n = 70) of the respondents had received training about reporting of adverse drug reactions. Almost one third of these (n = 21, 30%) had reported an adverse drug reaction on at least one occasion. Among nurses without training, a smaller proportion (n = 40, 11%, P < 0.05) had reported an adverse drug reaction on at least one occasion. The two factors considered most important by nurses for reporting were the severity of the adverse drug reaction and if the reaction was to a newly approved drug. A majority of the nurses (n = 397, 88%) were interested in a training course in pharmacology as part of their ongoing professional development. One third (32%) of all nurses stated that one reason for not reporting a suspected adverse drug reaction was that the physician responsible did not regard the reaction necessary to report.

Conclusion: We found that more than half of the study population of nurses in Sweden were aware of their new role as reporters of adverse drug reactions, but few of the responding nurses had reported an adverse drug reaction. Given that training seems to be associated with high reporting frequency, we suggest more training in pharmacovigilance for nurses.

National Category
Nursing Pharmaceutical Sciences
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences; Natural Science, Biomedical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-21312 (URN)10.2147/DHPS.S31103 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-08-27 Created: 2012-08-27 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Månsson, A., Norrby, M. & Tågerud, S. (2011). Molecular Motors and Self-Healing at the Neuromuscular Synapse (1ed.). In: Vincenzo Amendola & Moreno Meneghetti (Ed.), Self-Healing at the Nanoscale: Mechanisms and Key Concepts of Natural and Artificial Systems (pp. 357-394). CRC Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Molecular Motors and Self-Healing at the Neuromuscular Synapse
2011 (English)In: Self-Healing at the Nanoscale: Mechanisms and Key Concepts of Natural and Artificial Systems / [ed] Vincenzo Amendola & Moreno Meneghetti, CRC Press, 2011, 1, p. 357-394Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CRC Press, 2011 Edition: 1
National Category
Cell Biology
Research subject
Natural Science, Biomedical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-16291 (URN)978-1439854730 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2010-5146
Available from: 2011-12-21 Created: 2011-12-21 Last updated: 2015-09-14Bibliographically approved
Norrby, M. & Tågerud, S. (2010). Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2) in skeletal muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. Journal of Cellular Physiology, 223(1), 194-201
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2) in skeletal muscle atrophy and hypertrophy
2010 (English)In: Journal of Cellular Physiology, ISSN 0021-9541, E-ISSN 1097-4652, Vol. 223, no 1, p. 194-201Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Skeletal muscle is a highly plastic tissue. Overall muscle growth (hypertrophy) or muscle wasting (atrophy) results from alterations in intracellular signaling pathways with important regulatory steps occurring in the nucleus as well as in the cytoplasm. Previous studies have identified components of the Akt/mTor pathway as well as the p38 MAPK pathway as important for skeletal muscle hypertrophy and/or atrophy. The present study tests the hypothesis that MK2, a substrate of p38 which following phosphorylation, can be exported from the nucleus in a complex with p38, may be important for skeletal muscle growth. The expression of MK2 was examined in denervated mouse hind-limb (atrophic) and hemidiaphragm (transiently hypertrophic) muscles. MK2 mRNA expression decreased after denervation in both atrophic (48% of innervated controls, P < 0.001) and hypertrophic muscle (34% of innervated controls, P < 0.01) but MK2 protein expression decreased only in atrophic muscle (32% of innervated controls, P < 0.01). The level of T205 phosphorylated MK2 increased after denervation in both atrophic (fourfold increase, P < 0.01) and hypertrophic muscles (almost sevenfold increase, P < 0.001) whereas the level of T317 phosphorylated MK2 (necessary for nuclear export) increased after denervation in hypertrophic muscle (nearly threefold increase, P < 0.001) but not in atrophic muscle. Logarithmically transformed relative changes in MK2 phosphorylated at T317 correlated well (r2 = 0.7737) with relative changes in muscle weight. The results suggest a role for MK2 in the regulation of muscle mass, a role which, at least in part, may be related to determining the subcellular localization of p38 in muscle fibers. J. Cell. Physiol. 223: 194–201,

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Liss, Inc., 2010
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology
Research subject
Biomedical Sciences, Pharmacology; Natural Science, Biomedical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-2134 (URN)10.1002/jcp.22023 (DOI)
Available from: 2010-04-06 Created: 2010-04-06 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Hovstadius, B., Tågerud, S., Petersson, G. & Åstrand, B. (2010). Prevalence and therapeutic intensity of dispensed drug groups for individuals with multiple medications: a register-based study of 2.2 million individuals. Journal of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research, 1(4), 145-155
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalence and therapeutic intensity of dispensed drug groups for individuals with multiple medications: a register-based study of 2.2 million individuals
2010 (English)In: Journal of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research, ISSN 1759-8885, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 145-155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives  To assess the prevalence and the therapeutic intensity of dispensed drug groups for individuals receiving multiple medications.

Methods  The individual-based data of all dispensed outpatient prescriptions in Sweden in 2006 were analysed. Five or more dispensed drugs (DP ≥ 5) during a 12-month period were applied as an indicator of multiple medications. The drugs were categorized according to the second level of the World Health Organization's Anatomic, Therapeutic, Chemical classification. The defined daily dosage per individual during 12 months was applied as an indicator of the therapeutic intensity.

Key findings  For the 2.2 million individuals with DP ≥ 5, the drug groups with the highest prevalences were antibacterials (48.2%), analgesics (40.3%), psycholeptics (35.9%), antithrombotic agents (33.4%) and beta-blocking agents (31.7%). As examples, the level of prevalence increased with age for analgesics, psycholeptics, antithrombotic agents and diuretics, and decreased with age for antibacterials, drugs for obstructive airway diseases and antihistamines for systemic use. Substantial differences in the level of prevalence between women and men were observed for several drug groups; for example, thyroid therapy (13.3 vs 3.6%), psychoanaleptics (26.3 vs 18.2%), drugs used in diabetes (9.1 vs 15.7%) and lipid-modifying agents (18.1 vs 30.7%). Generally, the therapeutic intensity increased with the increasing number of dispensed drugs. For a third of the most common drug groups, the therapeutic intensity increased with an increasing age above the 60–69-year age group.

Conclusion  The number of drugs taken not only increases the potential risks associated with multiple drug use, but also increases the potential burden of an increased therapeutic intensity, especially for older people. The reported findings may enlighten physicians and healthcare stakeholders concerning the complex patterns of multiple drug use in the entire population and the associated expenses. The findings may also be used as a base for interventions aiming to bring about the most appropriate and balanced prescription of medicines to individuals with multiple diseases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Pharmaceutical Society, 2010
Keywords
Aged, Drug therapy, Drug utilization, Prescription drugs, Polypharmacy, Registries
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology
Research subject
Biomedical Sciences, Pharmacology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-2268 (URN)10.1111/j.1759-8893.2010.00029.x (DOI)2-s2.0-79953733150 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-04-07 Created: 2010-04-07 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
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