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Höglund, J. (2020). Indigenous Hauntings: Nordic Gothic and Colonialism. In: Maria Holmgren Troy, Johan Höglund, Yvonne Leffler, Sofia Wijkmark (Ed.), Nordic Gothic: (pp. 125-146). Manchester: Manchester University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indigenous Hauntings: Nordic Gothic and Colonialism
2020 (English)In: Nordic Gothic / [ed] Maria Holmgren Troy, Johan Höglund, Yvonne Leffler, Sofia Wijkmark, Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2020, p. 125-146Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter observes that while several studies of Anglophone Gothic has noted the close connection between Gothic and imperialism, very little of the scholarship that exists on Nordic Gothic has considered this dimension. This should be attributed not only to the general reluctance by scholarship to look beyond Anglophone Gothic, but also to the widespread belief that the Nordic countries remained outside the nineteenth-century colonial project. Referring to several studies that show that the Nordic nations were, in fact, eager participants in the colonial project, the chapter then discusses a number of late twentieth and early twenty-first century Nordic Gothic texts, with a focus on the fiction of Peter Høeg, Yrsa Sigurðardóttir and Anders Fager, and on the Swedish-French television series Idjabeaivváš (Jour Polaire/Midnight Sun/Midnattssol 2016). These texts are used to argue that Nordic Gothic, sometimes directly and sometimes furtively, addresses colonial concerns and that this tradition shows the same ambivalence towards this colonial past and present as does international Gothic.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2020
Series
International Gothic Series
Keywords
Nordic fiction, Gothic, Horror, Sápmi, Postcolonial Studies
National Category
Specific Literatures
Research subject
Humanities, Comparative literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-93157 (URN)978-1-5261-2643-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2020-03-26 Created: 2020-03-26 Last updated: 2020-03-26
Höglund, J. (2020). Nordic Gothic New Media. In: Maria Holmgren Troy, Johan Höglund, Yvonne Leffler, Sofia Wijkmark (Ed.), Nordic Gothic: (pp. 169-190). Manchester: Manchester University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nordic Gothic New Media
2020 (English)In: Nordic Gothic / [ed] Maria Holmgren Troy, Johan Höglund, Yvonne Leffler, Sofia Wijkmark, Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2020, p. 169-190Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter maps and analyses new Gothic media and video games developed in the Nordic region. The chapter first considers what the concepts Gothic and Nordic actually entail when the focus is new media rather than literature or cinema. This is followed by analyses of four of the more important and widely disseminated games and considers the interactive stories they tell in relation to the Nordic geographical, ideological and cultural landscape. The first two, Finnish Alan Wake (2010) and Swedish Little Nightmares (2017), are well funded and internationally distributed games made for an international audience. The other two, Swedish Year Walk (2013) and Norwegian Through the Woods (2016) are independent games that may look for wide dissemination, but that keep much closer to Nordic themes and settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2020
Series
International Gothic Series
Keywords
Nordic fiction, Gothic, Horror, Game Studies
National Category
Specific Literatures Studies on Film Other Humanities not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Humanities, Comparative literature; Humanities, Visual Culture; Humanities, Film Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-93158 (URN)978-1-5261-2643-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2020-03-26 Created: 2020-03-26 Last updated: 2020-03-26
Höglund, J. & Leffler, Y. (2020). The past that Haunts the Present: The Rise of Nordic Gothic. In: Maria Holmgren Troy, Johan Höglund, Yvonne Leffler, and Sofia Wijkmark (Ed.), Nordic Gothic: (pp. 11-28). Manchester: Manchester University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The past that Haunts the Present: The Rise of Nordic Gothic
2020 (English)In: Nordic Gothic / [ed] Maria Holmgren Troy, Johan Höglund, Yvonne Leffler, and Sofia Wijkmark, Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2020, p. 11-28Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

There is a long non-realist tradition in Nordic literature and film that goes back to the Romantic period. This tradition frequently employs typical Gothic tropes, it seeks to evoke feelings of terror and horror, and it negotiates, as Gothic is understood to do, the complex tension between the human subject and Enlightenment modernity. Due to a striking reluctance by generations of Nordic literary critics and scholarship to recognise a Gothic tradition in the region, it was not until the late 1980s that the existence of Gothic fiction in the Nordic countries began to be systematically explored through a number of studies by Yvonne Leffler.1 Since the turn of the millennium, different Nordic writers and aspects of Gothic have been investigated by Scandinavian scholars such as Mathias Fyhr, Henrik Johnsson, Sofia Wijkmark and Kirstine Kastbjerg.2 Some introductions and surveys of the Scandinavian tradition have also been published.3 Building on this scholarship, this chapter will trace the Nordic Gothic tradition from its beginnings in the late eighteenth century to the present moment. The aim is to provide a picture of how the Gothic tradition emerged in the Nordic region and to show how Nordic writers, filmmakers and, towards the end of the twentieth century, game producers, make use of Gothic tropes and themes. Several of the authors and filmmakers mentioned in this chapter will be discussed in more detail in other parts of the book.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2020
Series
International Gothic Series
Keywords
Nordic Literature, Nordic Film, Swedish literature, Norwegian Literature, Finnish Literature, Danish Literature, horror, gothic
National Category
Specific Literatures
Research subject
Humanities, Comparative literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-93155 (URN)978-1-5261-2643-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2020-03-26 Created: 2020-03-26 Last updated: 2020-03-26
Höglund, J. (2019). Christina Larsdotter and the Swedish Postcolonial Novel. Scandinavian Studies, 91(1-2), 238-258
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Christina Larsdotter and the Swedish Postcolonial Novel
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Studies, ISSN 0036-5637, E-ISSN 2163-8195, Vol. 91, no 1-2, p. 238-258Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Illinois Press on behalf of the Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study, 2019
National Category
Languages and Literature History
Research subject
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-87071 (URN)10.5406/scanstud.91.1-2.0238 (DOI)000475763500012 ()
Available from: 2019-08-01 Created: 2019-08-01 Last updated: 2019-08-01Bibliographically approved
Andersson Burnett, L. & Höglund, J. (Eds.). (2019). Exploring Nordic Colonialisms: Special Issue for Scandinavian Studies (91:1 and 91:2ed.). University of Illinois Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring Nordic Colonialisms: Special Issue for Scandinavian Studies
2019 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Illinois Press, 2019 Edition: 91:1 and 91:2
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-82234 (URN)
Available from: 2019-04-26 Created: 2019-04-26 Last updated: 2019-06-25
Höglund, J. & Andersson Burnett, L. (2019). Introduction: Nordic Colonialisms and Scandinavian Studies. Scandinavian Studies, 91(1-2), 1-12
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction: Nordic Colonialisms and Scandinavian Studies
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Studies, ISSN 0036-5637, E-ISSN 2163-8195, Vol. 91, no 1-2, p. 1-12Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Illinois Press on behalf of the Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study, 2019
National Category
History
Research subject
Humanities, History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-87068 (URN)10.5406/scanstud.91.1-2.0001 (DOI)000475763500001 ()
Available from: 2019-08-01 Created: 2019-08-01 Last updated: 2019-09-05Bibliographically approved
Höglund, J. (2019). Love in a time of Extinction: Precarity and Postcolonial Studies in the Anthropocene. In: International Workshop on Food and Representation: 29 - 30 October 2019, Monash University Malaysia. Paper presented at International Workshop on Food and Representation, 29 - 30 October 2019, Monash University Malaysia. Monash University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Love in a time of Extinction: Precarity and Postcolonial Studies in the Anthropocene
2019 (English)In: International Workshop on Food and Representation: 29 - 30 October 2019, Monash University Malaysia, Monash University , 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

There is increasing agreement within geology, oceanology, biology and other hard sciences that we have entered the Anthropocene (Crutzen and Stoermer 2000), although other concepts, such as Capitalocene (Moore 2015) and Chthulucene (Haraway 2016) have also been proposed. This era is already lodged in the sediments of the Earth, in the form of plastics, ash, metals, pesticides, or as fallout from thermonuclear testing in the late twentieth century (Waters et al. 2016). In the present moment, and even more so in the predictable future, the Anthropocene produces various states of precarity; in the global south where what Rob Nixon (2011) has termed “slow violence” impacts the lives of the poor; among thousands of species that, as Elisabeth Kolbert (2014) shows, are going extinct; and also inside all human bodies when chemicals accumulate in our fat tissue and when our microbiomes – our vital gut bacteria – are depleted by poor diets and an overuse of antibiotics.

From the perspective of the hard sciences, the Anthropocene is a human-induced era generated by the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, and by various pollutants and chemicals into the environment. However, this process, and humanity’s current and glaring inability to address the conflict, must also be understood as a cultural or ideological problem. As several humanities and social sciences scholars have observed (see e.g. Lorimer 2015, Tsing 2015, Chakrabarty 2016), the Anthropocene has been enabled by the anthropocentric notion that humankind is somehow apart from nature, and that nature exists to be governed by humanity. The relationship between modern humanity and the planet has thus been one of (colonial) ownership, not of friendship or love, or even of collaborative co-habitation. This prompts the questions: How can humanity, as Eben Kirksey (2018) has asked, learn to extend friendship and love across the barriers constituted by that geography, nationality and species?

With this question in mind, this talk explores new scholarly writing, art, literature and film that attempt to reimagine relations between human beings, and between human and non-human species. The talk thus surveys stories that recognize that humans are inevitably inside the planetary ecosystem, and also inhabited by a range of species vital to their survival. In this way, the talk investigates how visual and textual narratives imagine (interspecies) love and friendship as possible even in an age of conflict and extinction.

Chakrabarty, D. (2016) “Humanities in the Anthropocene: The Crisis of an Enduring Kantian Fable” New Literary History 47(2&3).

Crutzen, P, and Stoermer, E. (2000) “The Anthropocene”. IGBP Newsletter 41.

Haraway, D. (2016) Staying with the Trouble: Making Kin in the Chthulucene. (Durham: Duke UP).

Kirksey, E. (2018) “Queer Love, Gender Bending Bacteria, and Life after the Anthropocene” Theory, Culture & Society 0(0): 1-23.

Kolbert, E. (2014) The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History. New York: Henry Holt.

Moore, J. (2015) Capitalism in the Web of Life: Ecology and the Accumulation of Capital. New York: Verso

Nixon, R. (2011) Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor. Cambridge MA: Harvard UP.

Tsing, A. (2015) The Mushroom at the End of the World: On the Possibility of Life in Capitalist Ruins (Princeton: Princeton UP).

Waters, C. et al. (2016). “The Anthropocene is functionally and stratigraphically distinct from the Holocene” Science. 351(6269):aad2622-1-11

Lorimer, J. (2015) Wildlife in the Anthropocene: Conservation after Nature. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Monash University, 2019
National Category
Cultural Studies
Research subject
Humanities, Visual Culture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-92503 (URN)
Conference
International Workshop on Food and Representation, 29 - 30 October 2019, Monash University Malaysia
Available from: 2020-03-03 Created: 2020-03-03 Last updated: 2020-03-11Bibliographically approved
Edwards, J. D. & Höglund, J. (Eds.). (2018). B-Movie Gothic: International Perspectives. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>B-Movie Gothic: International Perspectives
2018 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Following the Second World War, low-budget B-movies that explored and exploited Gothic narratives and aesthetics became a significant cinematic expression of social and cultural anxieties. Influencing new trends in European, Asian and African filmmaking, these films carried on the tradition established by the Gothic novel, and yet they remain part of a largely neglected subject. B-Movie Gothic: International Perspectives examines the influence of Gothic B-movies on the cinematic traditions of the United States, Britain, Scandinavia, Spain, Turkey, Japan, Hong Kong and India, highlighting their transgressive, transnational and provocative nature. It shows how B-movie Gothic is a relentlessly creative form, filled with political tensions and moving from shocking conservatism to profound social critique.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2018. p. 236
Series
Traditions in World Cinema
Keywords
Gothic, Horror, Slasher, Empire, Imperial Gothic, Swedish Film, Genre
National Category
Studies on Film
Research subject
Humanities, Film Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-93153 (URN)9781474423441 (ISBN)9781474423465 (ISBN)9781474423458 (ISBN)
Projects
Narratives of Empire
Available from: 2020-03-26 Created: 2020-03-26 Last updated: 2020-03-26Bibliographically approved
Höglund, J. (2018). Censorship, the US Department of Defense and the Popular War Film. In: La fabrique des imaginaires : Censure contre-discours et société technicienne: Manufacturing Imaginaries : Censorship, Counter-discourses and the Technical Society. Paper presented at Manufacturing Imaginaries: Censorship, Counter-discourses and the Technical Society, 15-17 nov 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Censorship, the US Department of Defense and the Popular War Film
2018 (English)In: La fabrique des imaginaires : Censure contre-discours et société technicienne: Manufacturing Imaginaries : Censorship, Counter-discourses and the Technical Society, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In Virtuous War: Mapping the Military-Industrial-Media-Entertainment Network (2001) James Der Derian argues that, at least since the first Gulf War in 1990-1, the US Department of Defense has invested heavily in the mediation of war as a clinical and virtuous exercise with minimum civilian casualties. Unlike during the much criticised Vietnam War, media is kept outside the zones of battle as much as possible and depend on the DoD’s own media outlets for information. In addition to controlling news media’s reports from war zones, the DoD also seeks to actively produce the way that the entertainment industry – in particular Hollywood cinema, television shows, and computer games – represent the armed forces. As David L Robb describes in Operation Hollywood: How the Pentagon Shapes and Censors the Movies (2004), the DoD regularly funds block buster film. In exchange for extras, advisors, guns, helicopters and other tools of war, the DoD has been allowed to edit and censor film scripts. As Der Derian shows, the DoD has demanded that directors keep US military operations “virtuous” and movie directors thus incise, in particular, civilian carnage, producing an image of war as the surgical obliteration of enemy forces. Movies that have asked for DoD funding but refused to toe this line have not been given this funding. Thus, Ford Francis Coppola did not receive funding for Apocalypse Now (19XX), while Jerry Bruckheimer’s Top Gun (1986) were made with considerable aid from the DoD.

However, this formula begins to change with the film Black Hawk Down (2001), a film that shows extensive bloodletting, and civilian death but still received funding.  In recent years, DoD funded films such as Zero Dark Thirty (2014) and American Sniper (2016) show American soldiers and military personnel torturing civilians and shooting children. This paper explores this dramatic shift in the censorship of the visual representation of violence and considers what is still untold by DoD funded cinema.

Der Derian, James. Virtuous War: Mapping the Military-Industrial-Media-Entertainment Network. Boulder: Westview Press, 2001

Robb, David L. Operation Hollywood: How the Pentagon Shapes and Censors the Movies. New York: Prometheus Books, 2004

Keywords
War Cinema, Censorship
National Category
Studies on Film Cultural Studies
Research subject
Humanities, Cultural Sociology; Humanities, Film Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-80068 (URN)
Conference
Manufacturing Imaginaries: Censorship, Counter-discourses and the Technical Society, 15-17 nov 2018
Available from: 2019-01-30 Created: 2019-01-30 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Höglund, J. (2018). Eugenics. In: Kevin A. Morrison (Ed.), Companion to Victorian Popular Fiction: (pp. 78-80). Jefferson: McFarland
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eugenics
2018 (English)In: Companion to Victorian Popular Fiction / [ed] Kevin A. Morrison, Jefferson: McFarland, 2018, p. 78-80Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Jefferson: McFarland, 2018
Keywords
Victorian Literature, Eugenics
National Category
Specific Literatures
Research subject
Humanities, English literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-80058 (URN)978-1-4766-6903-8 (ISBN)978-1-4766-3359-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-01-30 Created: 2019-01-30 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3293-6324

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