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Gössling, S., Zeiss, H., Hall, C. M., Martin-Rios, C., Ram, Y. & Grøtte, I.-P. (2018). A cross-country comparison of accommodation manager perspectives on online review manipulation. Current Issues in Tourism, 1-20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A cross-country comparison of accommodation manager perspectives on online review manipulation
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2018 (English)In: Current Issues in Tourism, ISSN 1368-3500, E-ISSN 1747-7603, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Accommodation businesses are increasingly dependent on a limited number of reservation platforms. A significant feature of these platforms is guest evaluations, which are transformed into ratings and rankings. As the positioning of the business in comparison to competitors determines customer demand, accommodation managers have considerable interest in maintaining or improving their online reputation. One response may be to engage in manipulation strategies. This paper presents the results of a survey including 270 hotel managers in five countries, Germany, Israel, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland. Managers confirm growing competition as a result of ratings and rankings, and they report that guests are increasingly aware of the importance of reviews. To avert negative online feedback impacts, managers intervene strategically. The paper discusses new market pressures, emergent consumer judgement culture and consumer citizenship, opportunities for legal redress and the emerging importance of reputation management strategies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Consumer citizenship, hotels, manipulation, online reviews, rankings, ratings
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72449 (URN)10.1080/13683500.2018.1455171 (DOI)2-s2.0-85044251436 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-09 Created: 2018-04-09 Last updated: 2018-04-09
Gössling, S. (2018). Air transport and climate change (1ed.). In: Nigel Halpern & Anne Graham (Ed.), The Routledge Companion to air transport management: (pp. 402-416). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Air transport and climate change
2018 (English)In: The Routledge Companion to air transport management / [ed] Nigel Halpern & Anne Graham, London: Routledge, 2018, 1, p. 402-416Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2018 Edition: 1
Series
Routledge Companions in Business, Management and Accounting
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72455 (URN)9781138641372 (ISBN)9781315630540 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-04-09 Created: 2018-04-09 Last updated: 2018-04-09Bibliographically approved
Gössling, S., Cohen, S., Higham, J., Peeters, P. & Eijgelaar, E. (2018). Desirable transport futures. Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, 61(Part: B), 301-309
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Desirable transport futures
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2018 (English)In: Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, ISSN 1361-9209, E-ISSN 1879-2340, Vol. 61, no Part: B, p. 301-309Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This overview article for the special issue on 'Desirable Transport Futures' sets out with a brief introduction of the current development of the global transport system, suggesting that it remains unclear whether transport systems are heading towards desirable change. This desirability is defined as a reduction in the system's negative externalities, including accidents, congestion, pollutants and/or noise, while retaining its functionality. There is evidence that transport externalities continue to grow with an increasingly mobile and growing global population. Against this background, the article discusses what may constitute more desirable transport futures, as well as the barriers that have to be overcome to move towards such futures. The article concludes that transport governance will be essential to far-reaching change, and that greater focus has to be placed on individual and societal socio-psychological perspectives shaping mobility consumption. Nine papers contained in this special issue provide in-depth analyses of transport systems, as well as insight into how these may be changed in more systemic ways. A concluding research agenda is offered that outlines a number of innovative approaches researchers may pursue as part of further efforts to engender desirable transport futures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Barriers, Desirability, Policy, Systemic change, Transport futures, Environmental impact, Mechanical engineering, Public policy, Global population, In-depth analysis, Innovative approaches, Negative externalities, Transportation
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72451 (URN)10.1016/j.trd.2018.01.008 (DOI)000438003400007 ()2-s2.0-85042021653 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-09 Created: 2018-04-09 Last updated: 2018-07-27Bibliographically approved
Jacobsen, J. K. S., Gössling, S., Dybedal, P. & Skogheim, T. S. (2018). Exploring length of stay: international tourism in south-western Norway. Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management, 35, 29-35
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring length of stay: international tourism in south-western Norway
2018 (English)In: Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management, ISSN 1447-6770, Vol. 35, p. 29-35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article explored length of stay (LOS) in the context of tour planning, to assess as to whether LOS can be increased. LOS is an important parameter for tourism destination management, at the same time as evidence have suggested that LOS is declining on a global scale. The study was based on responses from 1592 foreign leisure travellers in south-western Norway, a region dominated by round-trips. The study uniquely explored aspects that influenced visitor planning of length of stay, finding that perceptions of time ‘needed’ for desired activities is the most important aspect of holiday duration planning, followed by limitations in the number of vacation days, holiday budgets and accommodation-related considerations. Visitors with a focus on the region, those with their own vehicles and those emphasising outdoor recreation and/or landscape sightseeing were likely to have longer stays. Findings suggested that destinations have potential to increase LOS. The paper additionally reflected on how identification of tourist segments with flexible time frames can contribute to destination management focused on LOS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Activity time, Destination management, Holiday planning, Length of stay, Round trip, Segmentation, Temporal flexibility
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72448 (URN)10.1016/j.jhtm.2018.02.003 (DOI)000434347500004 ()2-s2.0-85042486574 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-09 Created: 2018-04-09 Last updated: 2018-07-13Bibliographically approved
Choi, A. S., Gössling, S. & Ritchie, B. W. (2018). Flying with climate liability?: economic valuation of voluntary carbon offsets using forced choices. Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, 62, 225-235
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Flying with climate liability?: economic valuation of voluntary carbon offsets using forced choices
2018 (English)In: Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, ISSN 1361-9209, E-ISSN 1879-2340, Vol. 62, p. 225-235Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aims to examine how key aspects of voluntary climate action influence economic values of aviation carbon offsets using an Australian case study, where voluntary carbon offset programs for the aviation sector were active under a carbon tax between July 01, 2012 and July 17, 2014. An online survey was administered during the period using choice experiments. This rare and short-lived Australian experience is useful to gain insights into how individuals respond to the new public policy in terms of the perceived economic value of voluntary offsets for air travel. According to the estimation results, supporters of the mandatory tax policy held a welfare value of voluntary carbon offsets for their domestic flights that is three times larger than non-supporters (i.e., $AU27.83 vs. $AU9.40). It is $AU12.27 on average per ton of carbon offsets per person for domestic flights and $AU0.92 for international long-haul flights. The findings endorse that individuals seem to attach personal responsibility for carbon emissions (i.e. climate liability or carbon conscience) to frequent domestic flights, but not so much to intercontinental flights. Furthermore, reported flight frequencies by respondents did not place any significant impact on economic values of voluntary carbon offsets in both domestic and international frameworks. A coupled approach between forced choices and certainty responses was adapted, where no-choice options were retrieved, potentially improving choice experiments. Results suggest that airlines should consider simplifying their carbon offset programs to fixed levels (e.g. £3, £10, and £20 as in the case of British Airways), regardless of geographical boundaries, while governments should promote both mandatory and voluntary climate measures in tandem.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Air travel, Carbon offsets, Carbon tax, Choice experiments, Forced choices, Willingness to pay, Civil aviation, Economic analysis, Economic and social effects, Economics, Air travels, Carbon taxes, Air transportation
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72447 (URN)10.1016/j.trd.2018.02.018 (DOI)2-s2.0-85043245054 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-09 Created: 2018-04-09 Last updated: 2018-04-09Bibliographically approved
Gössling, S. (2018). ICT and transport behavior: a conceptual review. International Journal of Sustainable Transportation, 12(3), 153-164
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ICT and transport behavior: a conceptual review
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Sustainable Transportation, ISSN 1556-8318, E-ISSN 1556-8334, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 153-164Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Information and communication technologies (ICTs) have considerable importance for transport systems, as they provide access to travel information, planning tools, opportunities to share transport modes, to work at-a-distance, compare transport mode cost, make payment, improve safety and health, and to communicate travel patterns. Over the past decade, there has been massive growth in the availability of transportation ICT, in particular, smartphone applications. There is considerable evidence that ICTs have profoundly changed the ways in which transport systems are perceived and used, and mobilities performed, with far-reaching implications for transport mode choices and transport demand. Against this background, the paper seeks to conceptualize ICT with relevance for transport systems, and to discuss the implications for the environmental sustainability of the transport sector. Findings suggest that while some ICT innovations foster and support sustainable transport choices, others raise new and significant barriers to more sustainable transport futures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Information and communication technologies, mobilities, smartphone, transport apps, transport behaviour, Signal encoding, Smartphones, Sustainable development, Environmental sustainability, Smart-phone applications, Sustainable transport, Transport behavior, Transport mode choices, Transportation, accessibility, conceptual framework, information and communication technology, mobile phone, mobility, transportation mode, transportation system, travel demand
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72450 (URN)10.1080/15568318.2017.1338318 (DOI)000428107100001 ()2-s2.0-85021787387 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-09 Created: 2018-04-09 Last updated: 2018-04-13Bibliographically approved
Simonsen, M., Walnum, H. J. & Gössling, S. (2018). Model for Estimation of Fuel Consumption of Cruise Ships. Energies, 11(5), Article ID 1059.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Model for Estimation of Fuel Consumption of Cruise Ships
2018 (English)In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 11, no 5, article id 1059Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article presents a model to estimate the energy use and fuel consumption of cruise ships that sail Norwegian waters. Automatic identification system (AIS) data and technical information about cruise ships provided input to the model, including service speed, total power, and number of engines. The model was tested against real-world data obtained from a small cruise vessel and both a medium and large cruise ship. It is sensitive to speed and the corresponding engine load profile of the ship. A crucial determinate for total fuel consumption is also associated with hotel functions, which can make a large contribution to the overall energy use of cruise ships. Real-world data fits the model best when ship speed is 70-75% of service speed. With decreased or increased speed, the model tends to diverge from real-world observations. The model gives a proxy for calculation of fuel consumption associated with cruise ships that sail to Norwegian waters and can be used to estimate greenhouse gas emissions and to evaluate energy reduction strategies for cruise ships.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018
Keywords
cruise ship, AIS-data, fuel consumption, energy use, CO2 emissions
National Category
Energy Engineering Transport Systems and Logistics
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Bioenergy Technology; Tourism; Shipping
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-76891 (URN)10.3390/en11051059 (DOI)000435610300037 ()
Available from: 2018-07-17 Created: 2018-07-17 Last updated: 2018-07-17Bibliographically approved
Hanna, P., Kantenbacher, J., Cohen, S. & Gössling, S. (2018). Role model advocacy for sustainable transport. Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, 61(Part: B), 373-382
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Role model advocacy for sustainable transport
2018 (English)In: Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, ISSN 1361-9209, E-ISSN 1879-2340, Vol. 61, no Part: B, p. 373-382Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Individual aspirations of associating with role models are routinely harnessed by marketers, who for instance, use celebrity endorsement in selling brands and products. It appears there has been no research to date, however, on the potential for celebrity activism, or role model advocacy beyond celebrities, such as from politicians, to form effective interventions for encouraging sustainable transport behavior. This is despite studies suggesting that celebrity endorsement is a potential gateway for transforming public opinion on carbon intensive transport modes. The present paper consequently offers a critical review of the literature on role model advocacy and celebrity activism, and how these concepts have been harnessed to address environmental issues, in order to conceptually assess the potential for extending these intervention techniques to the context of sustainable transport. The scope of the paper includes the potential that high profile politicians/celebrities might play as role models in exercising referent power to influence social norms surrounding sustainable transport, given that the success of social marketing interventions are closely tied to the need for changes in the policy landscape. Key dimensions of role model endorsement in transport are identified and applied to a series of examples of how celebrity and political role models have influenced transport cultures. In addition to offering an original application of a theoretical framework to a new context, in order to help address the increasingly important societal issue of transport's growing contribution to climate change, the paper discusses the challenges associated with the neoliberal framing of this approach.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Behavior change, Celebrity endorsement, Identity, Neoliberalism, Social marketing, Sustainable transport, Carbon, Climate change, Commerce, Marketing, Social aspects, Celebrity endorsements, Social marketings, Transportation
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72453 (URN)10.1016/j.trd.2017.07.028 (DOI)000438003400012 ()2-s2.0-85028308698 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-09 Created: 2018-04-09 Last updated: 2018-07-27Bibliographically approved
Cohen, S. A., Hanna, P. & Gössling, S. (2018). The dark side of business travel: a media comments analysis. Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, 61(part B), 406-419
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The dark side of business travel: a media comments analysis
2018 (English)In: Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, ISSN 1361-9209, E-ISSN 1879-2340, Vol. 61, no part B, p. 406-419Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The publication of 'A darker side of hypermobility' (Cohen and Gössling, 2015), which reviewed the personal and social consequences of frequent travel, led to considerable media coverage and sparking of the public imagination, particularly with regards to the impacts of business travel. It featured in more than 85 news outlets across 17 countries, engendering over 150,000 social media shares and 433 media comments from readers, with the latter a source of insight into how the public reacts online when faced with an overview of the negative sides of frequent business travel. The present paper is theoretically framed by the role of discourse in social change and utilises discursive analysis as a method to evaluate this body of media comments. Our analysis finds two key identities are performed through public responses to the explicit health and social warnings concerned with frequent business travel: the 'flourishing hypermobile' and the 'floundering hypermobile'. The former either deny the health implications of frequent business travel, or present strategies to actively overcome them, while the latter seek solace in the public dissemination of the health warnings: they highlight their passivity in the construction of their identity as hypermobile and its associated health implications. The findings reveal a segment of business travellers who wish to reduce travel, but perceive this as beyond their locus of control. Business travel reductions are thus unlikely to happen through the agency of individual travellers, but rather by changes in the structural factors that influence human resource and corporate travel management policies. 

Keywords
Business travel, Discourse analysis, Health, Hypermobility, Media, Wellbeing, Human resource management, Transportation, Air transportation
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72454 (URN)10.1016/j.trd.2017.01.004 (DOI)2-s2.0-85014173651 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-09 Created: 2018-04-09 Last updated: 2018-08-13Bibliographically approved
Gössling, S., Hall, C. M. & Andersson, A.-C. (2018). The manager's dilemma: a conceptualization of online review manipulation strategies. Current Issues in Tourism, 21(5), 484-503
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The manager's dilemma: a conceptualization of online review manipulation strategies
2018 (English)In: Current Issues in Tourism, ISSN 1368-3500, E-ISSN 1747-7603, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 484-503Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Online evaluations are one of the most important innovations in tourism in recent years, often combining a review/rating (business-specific evaluation) and a ranking (inter-business comparison). As online reputation determines economic success, tourism managers may be tempted to manipulate online content. This paper presents the results from a qualitative study involving 20 hotel managers in southern Sweden, and their perspectives on manipulation. Results confirm that there exists a wide range of review manipulation strategies, many of which are difficult to control. Even though only few managers appear to systematically manipulate, online evaluations represent a significant challenge for businesses, as they introduce direct competition and foster consumer judgement cultures. It is postulated that managers will increasingly find themselves in a Prisoner's dilemma, representing a situation where engaging in manipulation is the most rational choice in an increasingly competitive market situation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Economy, Business administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-48762 (URN)10.1080/13683500.2015.1127337 (DOI)000423747800002 ()
Available from: 2016-01-13 Created: 2016-01-13 Last updated: 2018-02-15Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0505-9207

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