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Maricic, Ibolya
Publications (10 of 13) Show all publications
Maricic, I., Pecorari, D. & Hommerberg, C. (2017). Weighing English in the balance: University teachers' perspectives on teaching through a second language. Paper presented at Språk och norm : ASLA:s symposium, Uppsala universitet 21–22 april 2016 [ Language and norms : The ASLA Symposium, Uppsala University 21–22 April 2016 ]. ASLAs skriftserie (26), 78-86
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Weighing English in the balance: University teachers' perspectives on teaching through a second language
2017 (English)In: ASLAs skriftserie, ISSN 1100-5629, no 26, p. 78-86Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

English is increasingly used nowadays as a medium of instruction in tertiary education worldwide, facilitating the outward mobility of home universities' staff and students, as well as the inward recruitment of international faculty and students. However, teaching and learning in a foreign language can be a challenging enterprise, and the implications of the trend toward English-medium instruction (EMI) are to date not fully understood. Based on a large-scale survey, this study aims at unveiling the perceptions and experiences of Swedish university teachers involved in EMI. The respondents express a wide array of views and experiences, grouped under ten thematic areas. The respondents' views are often polarised in that they identify both costs and benefits of teaching in English, while describing a reality where little support is provided to augment the benefits and mitigate the costs. These results indicate a need for enhanced communication with all stakeholder groups, to raise critical awareness about impending costs, as a step toward minimizing potential damages and maximizing the benefits of English in higher education today.

Keywords
English as a medium of instruction, English as a second or foreign language, multilingual higher education, parallel language environment, teacher attitudes
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities, English Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-60224 (URN)
Conference
Språk och norm : ASLA:s symposium, Uppsala universitet 21–22 april 2016 [ Language and norms : The ASLA Symposium, Uppsala University 21–22 April 2016 ]
Projects
PROFiLE
Note

ISBN: 978-91-87884-26-9

Available from: 2017-01-25 Created: 2017-01-25 Last updated: 2018-01-22Bibliographically approved
Maricic, I., Pecorari, D. & Hommerberg, C. (2016). Golden opportunity, necessary evil or sword of Damocles?: What teachers say about English-medium instruction. In: ASLA-symposiet 2016: Språk och norm. Paper presented at ASLA-symposiet 2016 : Språk och norm.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Golden opportunity, necessary evil or sword of Damocles?: What teachers say about English-medium instruction
2016 (English)In: ASLA-symposiet 2016: Språk och norm, 2016Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The number of university programmes taught exclusively through the medium of English around the world is rising, and when the partial use of English is taken into account (for example, when the language of instruction is the local language but the textbook is in English), then the role of English in higher education is seen to be pervasive indeed. The increasing use of English has, however, been driven to a great extent by policy, rather than by bottom-up preferences on the part of participants in English-medium settings, making it relevant to ask what their perceptions and understandings of the phenomenon are.

This paper will present the results of a large-scale survey of Swedish university teachers and their views on and experiences of the use of English in higher education. The findings show that teachers identify both positives and negatives, but also describe a situation in which there are only limited attempts to accentuate the former and mitigate the latter.

National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Humanities, English Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-57577 (URN)
Conference
ASLA-symposiet 2016 : Språk och norm
Projects
PROFiLE
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR2013-2373
Available from: 2016-10-24 Created: 2016-10-24 Last updated: 2016-12-16Bibliographically approved
Maricic, I. (2016). [ Review of ] Inductive or Deductive? The Impact of Method of Instruction on the Acquisition of Pragmatic Competence in EFL: Karen Glaser. Newcastle upon Tyne, England : Cambridge Scholars, 2014 [Review]. TESOL quarterly (Print), 50(2), 528-530
Open this publication in new window or tab >>[ Review of ] Inductive or Deductive? The Impact of Method of Instruction on the Acquisition of Pragmatic Competence in EFL: Karen Glaser. Newcastle upon Tyne, England : Cambridge Scholars, 2014
2016 (English)In: TESOL quarterly (Print), ISSN 0039-8322, E-ISSN 1545-7249, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 528-530Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2016
Keywords
EFL, inductive method, deductive method, pragmatic competence acquisition
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities, English Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-57534 (URN)10.1002/tesq.302 (DOI)000385341400016 ()2-s2.0-84968918585 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-10-21 Created: 2016-10-21 Last updated: 2018-01-14Bibliographically approved
Rieloff, M., Maricic, I. & Gunnarsson, I. (2015). Forskarstuderandes behov: Språkstöd/språkgranskning, publiceringsstrategier,informationssökning och referenshantering. Linnéuniversitetet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Forskarstuderandes behov: Språkstöd/språkgranskning, publiceringsstrategier,informationssökning och referenshantering
2015 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linnéuniversitetet, 2015. p. 24
National Category
Information Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-42200 (URN)
Available from: 2015-04-13 Created: 2015-04-13 Last updated: 2015-06-11Bibliographically approved
Maricic, I., Pecorari, D. & Hommerberg, C. (2015). Supporting language learning in the English-medium university classroom: Teacher attitudes, beliefs and practices. In: 2015 joint conference of the American Association for Applied Linguistics (AAAL) and L'Association Canadienne de Linguistique Appliquée/Canadian Association of Applied Linguistics (ACLA/CAAL), Toronto, Canada: . Paper presented at 2015 joint conference of the American Association for Applied Linguistics (AAAL) and L'Association Canadienne de Linguistique Appliquée/Canadian Association of Applied Linguistics (ACLA/CAAL), Toronto, Canada.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Supporting language learning in the English-medium university classroom: Teacher attitudes, beliefs and practices
2015 (English)In: 2015 joint conference of the American Association for Applied Linguistics (AAAL) and L'Association Canadienne de Linguistique Appliquée/Canadian Association of Applied Linguistics (ACLA/CAAL), Toronto, Canada, 2015Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In the context of a pronounced internationalization trend in Swedish higher education, this paper investigates university teachers’ attitudes towards and practices of using English as medium of instruction. Findings from questionnaire and interview data indicate diverse attitudes and a widespread lack in specific pedagogical practices that promote language learning.

National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Humanities, English Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-57578 (URN)
Conference
2015 joint conference of the American Association for Applied Linguistics (AAAL) and L'Association Canadienne de Linguistique Appliquée/Canadian Association of Applied Linguistics (ACLA/CAAL), Toronto, Canada
Available from: 2016-10-24 Created: 2016-10-24 Last updated: 2016-12-16Bibliographically approved
Maricic, I. & Pecorari, D. (2013). Mind the gap!: highlighting novelty in conference abstracts. In: : . Paper presented at BALEAP Biennial Conference, 19-21 April, 2013, Nottingham.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mind the gap!: highlighting novelty in conference abstracts
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The conference abstract or proposal is a promotional genre, intended to secure the acceptance of a paper at a conference and often (especially in the 'hard' disciplines) in subsequent proceedings. It is therefore, as Hyland and Tse (2005) note, a high-stakes genre, and therefore one which early-career researchers need to master.

 

One promotional resource is to show the research to be novel and original; to demonstrate (in Swales' 1990 terms) that a gap exists in the research literature.  Given that a significant proportion of space in abstracts is given over to material which corresponds to the introduction in the paper itself (Cutting, 2012), opportunities for highlighting the gap exist.  However, not all authors take advantage of this opportunity.  reported that Just over 40% of the TESOL abstracts were found not to contain a 'gap statement' (Halleck and Connor, 2006) . 

 

One factor driving the propensity to include a gap statement (or not) appears to be first language (Yakhontova, 2006). In addition, novice researchers may be less likely to deploy this feature which can help them promote their work.

 

This paper will report the results of an investigation into conference asbstracts in the sciences and engineering. Two corpora, one consisting of abstracts written by postgraduates during an academic writing course, and one consisting of accepted and published abstracts were analysed for two features: the presence or absence of a 'gap' statement, and the lexical and structural routines used for describing the gap. Comparisons between the corpora will be presented, and implications for the academic writing classroom will be addressed.

 

References

 

Cutting, D. J. (2012). Vague language in conference abstracts. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 11, 283–293.

Halleck, G. B., & Connor, U. M. (2006). Rhetorical moves in TESOL conference proposals. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 5, 70–86.

Hyland, K., & Tse, P. (2005). Hooking the reader: a corpus study of evaluative that in abstracts. English for Specific Purposes, 24, 123–139.

Swales, J. (1990). Genre analysis: English in academic and research settings. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Yakhontova, T. (2006). Cultural and disciplinary variation in academic discourse: The issue of influencing factors. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 5, 153–167.

Keywords
applied linguistics; English applied linguistics; academic writing; English for academic purposesc
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Research subject
Humanities, English; Humanities, Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-25370 (URN)
Conference
BALEAP Biennial Conference, 19-21 April, 2013, Nottingham
Available from: 2013-04-21 Created: 2013-04-21 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Maricic, I. (2005). Face in cyberspace: Facework, (im)politeness and conflict in English discussion groups. (Doctoral dissertation). Växjö: Växjö University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Face in cyberspace: Facework, (im)politeness and conflict in English discussion groups
2005 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the current study is to explore the discourse strategies and linguistic resources employed by the participants in English electronic discussion fora when handling ‘face’ (public self-image) and conflict online.

Two data sets were collected from the moderated Musiclassical mailing list and from the non-moderated alt.news-media newsgroup. The findings revealed three major categories of facework and conflict management: Confrontational, Cooperative and Evasive. Confrontational facework and impoliteness were particularly prominent in the non-moderated alt.news-media discussion threads. In the moderated Musiclassical discussions interpersonal conflict emerged gradually, counterbalanced by Cooperative and Evasive facework. Confrontational facework prevailed nonetheless in the third thread, despite the presence of moderators and list-specific norms of conduct. While conduct control did not fully inhibit confrontation in Musiclassical, its total absence in alt.news-media was clearly reflected in the amount and coarseness of uninhibited verbal aggression and rudeness. In both groups the focus of the conflicts shifted from the substantial issue to interpersonal conflict. Moreover, while the conflicts proper were terminated, the controversial issues remained unresolved in both fora. The prolific shifting of facework types across the threads bears witness to the dynamic character of online group interaction, where in want of paralinguistic cues, the participants need to balance verbally between competitive confrontation and supportive cooperation in pursuit of their communicative goals.

The study proposes a new integrated typology of (im)politeness, facework and conflict management. It highlights aspects of facework in conflict not dealt with earlier, i.e. the output (im)politeness strategies and linguistic resources through which facework and conflict management are realised, the crucial interpretative role of the recipient(s) and third parties, as well as the dynamics of facework across messages and discussion threads. It contributes to our understanding of how and why online conflicts emerge, evolve and decrease and how they are managed in textual multiparty discussions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Växjö: Växjö University Press, 2005. p. 241
Series
Acta Wexionensia, ISSN 1404-4307 ; 57
Keywords
computer-mediated discourse, computer-mediated interaction, conflict management, discussion groups, face, facework, flaming, (im)politeness, strategies, verbal conflict
National Category
Specific Languages Specific Languages Communication Studies
Research subject
Humanities, English
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vxu:diva-2688 (URN)91-7636-444-5 (ISBN)
Public defence
(English)
Available from: 2007-12-04 Created: 2007-12-04 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Maricic, I. (2004). Facework in cyber-conflict: A pragmalinguistic study of an online discussion. In: Cornelia Ilie (Ed.), Cornelia Ilie (Ed.), Language, culture, rhetoric: cultural and rhetorical perspectives on communication : papers from the ASLA symposium in Örebro, 6-7 November 2003. Paper presented at ASLA symposium in Örebro, 6-7 November 2003 (pp. 204-220). Uppsala: Association suédoise de linguistique appliqué (ASLA)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Facework in cyber-conflict: A pragmalinguistic study of an online discussion
2004 (English)In: Language, culture, rhetoric: cultural and rhetorical perspectives on communication : papers from the ASLA symposium in Örebro, 6-7 November 2003 / [ed] Cornelia Ilie, Uppsala: Association suédoise de linguistique appliqué (ASLA) , 2004, p. 204-220Conference paper, Published paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

It has been observed that the exclusive textual nature of computer-mediated discourse (CMD) and the relative anonymity of cyberspace foster non-conforming linguistic behaviour and open verbal conflicts in online discussions (e.g. Dery 1994, Mabry 1997, Herring 1999). It is also well known that conflicts are inherently face-threatening (cf. Brown & Levinson 1987). Despite these observations, the linguistic aspects of facework and conflict management in cyberspace have received little scholarly attention so far. The present study aimsat uncovering the dynamics of facework and conflict management in an asynchronous discussion group. The qualitative analysis draws on Oetzel et al.’s (2000/2001) facework typology in face-to-face conflict. The data sample from the recreational mailing list Musiclassical consists of a 66-message-long multiparty discussion thread on religious beliefs. Given the textual nature of the medium, the activity type, i.e. discussion with relative strangers on a sensitive topic, the author argues that a verbal conflict is bound to arise and proliferate and that confrontational facework and conflict management will prevail in this forum. Furthermore, the conflict at hand is expected to be handled by the group, but not to be resolved. The findings reveal that confrontational messages did prevail indeed. Interestingly however, in more than a quarter of the messages examined the senders used a blend of various facework types. Moreover, the conflict was terminated but not resolved. The shifting and mixing of facework types and conflict management styles on both message and thread level bear witness to the dynamic character of computer-mediated group interaction. This study contributes to our understanding of the prevailing facework types and conflict management styles of a virtual discourse community, as well as to the exploration of the discourse dynamics of conflict talk in cyberspace.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Association suédoise de linguistique appliqué (ASLA), 2004
Series
ASLA:s skriftserie, ISSN 1100-5629 ; 17
Keywords
Conflict management, discussion group, facework, flaming, (im)politeness strategies, online interaction, verbal conflict
National Category
Specific Languages Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities, English
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vxu:diva-2692 (URN)91-87884-17-8 (ISBN)
Conference
ASLA symposium in Örebro, 6-7 November 2003
Available from: 2007-12-04 Created: 2007-12-04 Last updated: 2018-02-05Bibliographically approved
Maricic, I. (2001). Cyberpoliteness: Requesting strategies on the Linguist List. In: Enikö Németh (Ed.), Enikö Németh (Ed.), Pragmatics in 2000: Selected papers from the 7th International Pragmatics Conference, Vol. 2. Paper presented at The 7th International Pragmatics Conference (Budapest, 9-14 July 2000) (pp. 409-416). Antwerp: International Pragmatics Association (IprA)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cyberpoliteness: Requesting strategies on the Linguist List
2001 (English)In: Pragmatics in 2000: Selected papers from the 7th International Pragmatics Conference, Vol. 2 / [ed] Enikö Németh, Antwerp: International Pragmatics Association (IprA) , 2001, p. 409-416Conference paper, Published paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

The increasing popularity of computer-mediated communication (CMC) has recently generated a growing research interest among various scholars around the world. Nevertheless, the explicit or implicit interactional strategies employed in CMC have received very little attention so far. Based on Brown and Levinson’s (1987) framework, this study examines the politeness strategies used in 273 queries sent to an asynchronous electronic forum, the Linguist List. First of all, the results of the structural analysis reveal that the omission of some structural components such as salutations, sender- and/or topic introductions and complementary closings in 64% of the queries is related to the choice of politeness strategies. Thus, the total absence of introductory components in 13% of the data coincides with pure bald-on-record requests.

Secondly, content analysis confirms the assumed predominance of negative politeness strategies in 46% of the queries, while combined with other strategies they are present in no less than 87% of the data. Negative strategies, linguistically realised by the use of hedges, politeness markers, if-clauses, -ing forms, tentative modals etc., appear to be partly caused by the face-threatening potential and the high imposition rate inherent in requests and partly by the senders’ unfamiliarity with the list. Furthermore, a majority of the queries (87%) were found to consist of a blend of at least two strategies. Not surprisingly, positive strategies prevail in merely 18% of the queries. The unexpectedly high rate of predominantly bald-on-record requests (36%) is argued to be a result of some participants’ familiarity with the list and/or their evaluation of the triviality of the request. Off-record or hinting strategies, although present in 16% of the data, were not found to be predominant in any of the queries. To sum up, this study contributes to our understanding of the prevailing patterns of politeness used in cyberspace as well as to the exploration of the nature of pragmatic success in online requesting.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Antwerp: International Pragmatics Association (IprA), 2001
Keywords
computer-mediated interaction, discussion group, face, facework, linguistic politeness, requesting strategies
National Category
Specific Languages Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities, English
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vxu:diva-2691 (URN)90-801148-5-5 (ISBN)
Conference
The 7th International Pragmatics Conference (Budapest, 9-14 July 2000)
Available from: 2007-12-04 Created: 2007-12-04 Last updated: 2018-02-05Bibliographically approved
Virtanen, T. & Maricic, I. (2000). Introduction. In: Perspectives on Discourse: Proceedings from the 1998 and 1999 Discourse Symposia at Växjö University (pp. 1-4). Växjö University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction
2000 (English)In: Perspectives on Discourse: Proceedings from the 1998 and 1999 Discourse Symposia at Växjö University, Växjö University Press , 2000, p. 1-4Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Växjö University Press, 2000
Research subject
Humanities, English
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vxu:diva-2695 (URN)91-7636-237-X (ISBN)
Available from: 2007-12-04 Created: 2007-12-04 Last updated: 2010-03-09Bibliographically approved
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