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Reneland-Forsman, Linda
Publications (10 of 20) Show all publications
Reneland-Forsman, L. (2017). A student oriented course design model for higher education. In: NERA 2017 Abstracts, 23-25 March 2017, Copenhagen, Denmark: Learning and education - material conditions and consequences. Paper presented at NERA, Copenhagen. , Article ID 124.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A student oriented course design model for higher education
2017 (English)In: NERA 2017 Abstracts, 23-25 March 2017, Copenhagen, Denmark: Learning and education - material conditions and consequences, 2017, article id 124Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Research topic/Aim: This is a case study testing a model for designing courses and programs in Higher Education for changing, analysing and implementing student oriented course design. The model addresses processes necessary to activate to diminish the gap between what students bring to learning and course objectives.

The model is the product of a fourVyear project with the aim to enhance teachers competences on student activity and support students’ knowledge building processes influencing goal fulfilment and completion rates. The model is now implemented also outside teacher training for independent courses in Pedagogy.

Theoretical frameworks: The model is framed by theories of meaning making identifying three main areas of research in Higher Education Pedagogy important to address as didactic considerations when trying to make a stand against more deterministic and neoVliberal influences on education that view students as more passive recipients of knowledge. The three areas with consequences for student meaning making as course design are:

  • Student expectations and experiences

  • A multimodal turn

  • Knowledge as socially constructed

    Methodology/research design: This project is action research based in that sense that teachers have been researching their teaching practice constructing the preliminary empirical data (onVgoing project). GoalVfulfilment (retention rates), focusVgroups interview with students and survey data constitute this preliminary empirical data package. Courses studied are courses in preVschool teacher training (campus and flexible) and Pedagogy A (webVbased).

    Expected conclusions/Findings: Teaching today means spending more time geographically separated from students. We therefore need to create rich learning cultures to promote student activities, initiatives and meaning making processes. Previous research shows that students’ expectations and previous experience colour and orient their actions in a course environment. The design process therefore has to consider student attitudes to and previous expectation of content and higher education studies. At our disposal is a wide range of multimodal technology that should be used to keep student at task and not by teachers to produce knowledge object for consumption. These technologies should also be used for sharing, objectifying and discussing course content, decreasing a pedagogical distance.

    Here digital media and a careful communication strategy has been used to align student expectation with course managements and used for establishing an understanding for theories and common terms necessary as a foundation for reading course literature and passing exams. In one completely webVbased course 50% of the students passed the first exam compared to 29% of registered students before course development. Developed courses scored high among students in terms of stimulating creativity and critical thinking, feedVback, assessment supporting course aims and information during course.

Relevance for Nordic Educational Research: This presentation wish to make a stand in favour of the concept of student oriented learning and not student centred learning. There is a difference between acting from students’ expectations and wishes and acting with student goal fulfilment in focus. A student oriented learning process in Higher Education, instead use what we know about how student learn to make sure that the learning environment offers these keyVcomponents.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-65958 (URN)
Conference
NERA, Copenhagen
Available from: 2017-06-29 Created: 2017-06-29 Last updated: 2017-07-25Bibliographically approved
Reneland-Forsman, L. (2017). Designing for active supportive learning cultures. Utbildning och Lärande / Education and Learning, 11(1), 48-63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing for active supportive learning cultures
2017 (English)In: Utbildning och Lärande / Education and Learning, ISSN 2001-4554, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 48-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [sv]

I samtida och framtida lärkulturer beskrivs studenter ofta som självreglerande, självständiga och kunskapssökande studenter med världen som sitt redskap för kunskapsutveckling. Ur många aspekter skiljer sig den bilden från senaste års debatt i Sverige om studenter med försämrade förkunskaper och låg motivation för studier. Denna studie avser att istället lyfta diskussionen till att handla om studenters handlingar och hur dessa kan påverkas av mötet med en undervisningsmiljö.

I denna studie analyseras och diskuteras lärkulturer som studenters kommunikativa hand- lingar vid två längre utbildningsprogram. Handlingarna kategoriserades utifrån människors livsattityder och förhållningssätt i mötet med en utbildningsmiljö. Studenters handlingar och strategier bör inte betraktas som xa identiteter eller grupperingar utan bör ses som reaktioner på mötet med en lärmiljö. Frågan aktualiserar syftet med högre utbildning samt ansvar för utformningen av lärmiljöer som bättre stödjer studenters meningsskapande och måluppfyllelse.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Högskolan i Skövde, 2017
Keywords
högre utbildning, lärkulturer, MDA, studentaktiva arbetssätt, studentkulturer, utbildningsdesign
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-68978 (URN)
Available from: 2017-11-24 Created: 2017-11-24 Last updated: 2018-02-28Bibliographically approved
Willén-Lundgren, B. & Reneland-Forsman, L. (2017). Värderelationell reflektion med stöd av digital spegling. Utbildning och Lärande / Education and Learning, 11(1), 34-46
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Värderelationell reflektion med stöd av digital spegling
2017 (Swedish)In: Utbildning och Lärande / Education and Learning, ISSN 2001-4554, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 34-46Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study presents a development project within pre-school teacher training at Linnaeus University with the purpose to enhance student activity, goal fulfilment and the use of digital media. Empirical data is from an assessment where students were filmed in two steps, the second time by themselves, reflecting on a previously filmed presentation. Student previous knowledge is used as a capacity for self-reflection elaborating meta-cognitive awareness for a future teaching practice. The study uses a relational approach which takes into account both cognitive and emotional aspects of learning. Analyses show an enhanced meta-cognitive awareness of future pedagogical practice manifested at three levels. Students’ strategies vary between being able to act upon established knowledge in a pedagogical practice to be- ing able to stretch into and vision a future practice and discuss consequences for relations and the impact of democratic values in practice. Digital reflections as a didactical tool were by students themselves regarded as supportive for qualitative variations of reflections related to a future professional practice although further precision in task description and framing is probably necessary for a majority to develop an elaborated awareness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Högskolan i Skövde, 2017
Keywords
higher education, self-reflection, teacher training, transformative learning
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-69133 (URN)
Available from: 2017-12-08 Created: 2017-12-08 Last updated: 2018-02-28Bibliographically approved
Reneland-Forsman, L. (2016). Guiding principles for course design. In: Chova, LG; Martinez, AL; Torres, IC (Ed.), INTED 2016: The 10th annual International Technology, Education and Development Conference.: . Paper presented at INTED The 10th annual International Technology, Education and Development Conference. Valencia, Spain, 7-9 March, 2016 (pp. 6557). INTED
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Guiding principles for course design
2016 (English)In: INTED 2016: The 10th annual International Technology, Education and Development Conference. / [ed] Chova, LG; Martinez, AL; Torres, IC, INTED , 2016, p. 6557-Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Guiding principles for course design

This presentation focuses guiding principles and supporting structures fostering a learning culture with active students, better used teaching resources (including ICT) and a high degree of goal fulfilment within higher education. The principles have emanated of a three year pedagogical development program at the Linnaeus University in Sweden allowing teachers to research their own everyday practice to create learning environments better supporting students’ learning processes and being able to change learning cultures in a long time project.  A simple design model is developed and put into practice to help teachers struggling with teaching tasks everyday. The model could work as a planning and evaluating tool as well as a foundation for discussion teaching practices. 

 

As educators in Higher Education (HE) we have a choice to either successfully supply students with what they are asking for or successfully design their learning processes. Taking the first road equals success and student satisfaction and risk getting stuck in short or narrow sighted solutions and quick fixes. Choosing the careful design perspective on the other hand acknowledges us as professionals in making informed didactical choices.

  Taking the consequences of living in a global and digitized society means including all means in this design task –thereby including ICT in our didactical considerations. The design concept here rests on research within three fields, i.e. student attitudes & expectations, multimodality & representations, and knowledge as socially constructed.  When the academic community challenges what technologies can do for them, digital technologies become knowledge technologies that “shape what is learned by changing how it´s learned. That means identifying where technology can make a difference. For this we need a framing, a sound foundation that identifies central and relevant theoretical concepts for students’ engagement in learning which serve as an aggregation of intellectual tools to understand and be better prepared to teach in a contemporary educational institution.

Summing up:

The presentation focuses guiding principles for course design and their theoretical foundation in HE- pedagogy. The principles have emanated of a three year pedagogical development program at the Linnaeus Univeristy in Sweden allowing teachers to research their own everyday practice to create learning environments better supporting students’ learning processes and being able to change learning cultures in a long time projekt.

 

 

 

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
INTED, 2016
Series
INTED Proceedings, ISSN 2340-1079
Keywords
course design, higher education, multimodality, student orientation
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-65959 (URN)000402738406080 ()978-84-608-5617-7 (ISBN)
Conference
INTED The 10th annual International Technology, Education and Development Conference. Valencia, Spain, 7-9 March, 2016
Available from: 2017-06-29 Created: 2017-06-29 Last updated: 2017-07-12Bibliographically approved
Reneland-Forsman, L. (2016). Participating with Experience: A Case Study of Students as Co-Producers of Course Design. Higher Education Studies, 6(1), 15-23
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Participating with Experience: A Case Study of Students as Co-Producers of Course Design
2016 (English)In: Higher Education Studies, ISSN 1925-4741, E-ISSN 1925-475X, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 15-23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Higher Education needs to handle a diverse student population. The role of student expectations and previous experience is a key to fully participate. This study investigates student meaning making and interaction in a course designed to stimulate student as co-creators of course content and aims. Results revealed that rich communication added structure for students, that open-ended design challenged student approaches and constructed students as subjects. Analysis was made using recorded webinars, asynchronous discussion forums and e-mails. Data was categorised as communicative actions based on their orientations in the course i.e. what further actions they provoked. Analysis was guided by theories on participation and framing (Wenger & Bernstein). The influence of dominating discourses for the didactics of HE risk excluding some perspectives and experiences when students’ experiences and expectations are not regarded as contributing to the meaning making of their own participating in academic educational practices. Finally, the study suggests that a move into web-based contexts more easily challenges students’ preconceptions of studying.

Keywords
course design, Higher Education, participation, student experience
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, Pedagogics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-47680 (URN)10.5539/hes.v6n1p15 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-12-01 Created: 2015-12-01 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Reneland-Forsman, L. (2015). Vad kan göra skillnad för studenter?: Om guidande principer och verktyg för kursdesign. In: Symposium. Nystart Linné: Guiding principles and tools for course design.. Paper presented at Next Generation Learning Conference 2015. Dalarna University. SE.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vad kan göra skillnad för studenter?: Om guidande principer och verktyg för kursdesign
2015 (English)In: Symposium. Nystart Linné: Guiding principles and tools for course design., 2015Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-65960 (URN)
Conference
Next Generation Learning Conference 2015. Dalarna University. SE
Available from: 2017-06-29 Created: 2017-06-29 Last updated: 2017-07-25Bibliographically approved
Reneland-Forsman, L. (2013). Arenas For Learning: Enhancing Student Interaction In Online Education. In: : . Paper presented at Workshop EDEN. Zagreb University. HR..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Arenas For Learning: Enhancing Student Interaction In Online Education
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-65962 (URN)
Conference
Workshop EDEN. Zagreb University. HR.
Note

Ej belagd 20170724

Available from: 2017-06-29 Created: 2017-06-29 Last updated: 2017-07-25Bibliographically approved
Creelman, A. & Reneland-Forsman, L. (2013). Completion Rates – A False Trail to Measuring Course Quality?: Let’s Call in the HEROEs Instead. European Journal of Open and Distance Learning, 16(2), 40-49
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Completion Rates – A False Trail to Measuring Course Quality?: Let’s Call in the HEROEs Instead
2013 (English)In: European Journal of Open and Distance Learning, ISSN 1027-5207, E-ISSN 1027-5207, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 40-49Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Statistics are often used to reveal significant differences between online and campus-based education. The existence of online courses with low completion rates is often used to justify the inherent inferiority of online education compared to traditional classroom teaching. Our study revealed that this type of conclusion has little substance. We have performed three closely linked analyses of empirical data from Linnaeus University aimed at reaching a better understanding of completion rates. Differences in completion rates revealed themselves to be more substantial between faculties than between distribution forms. The key-factor lies in design. Courses with the highest completion rates had three things in common; active discussion forums, complementing media and collaborative activities. We believe that the time has come to move away from theoretical models of learning where web-based learning/distance learning/e-learning are seen as simply emphasizing the separation of teacher and students. Low completion rates should instead be addressed as a lack of insight and respect for the consequences of online pedagogical practice and its prerequisites.

Keywords
completion rates, course design, online courses, web-based education
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-29094 (URN)
Available from: 2013-09-30 Created: 2013-09-30 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Reneland-Forsman, L. (2013). Students' web-based actions when linking theory and practice. International Journal of Web Based Communities, 9(4), 448-464
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Students' web-based actions when linking theory and practice
2013 (English)In: International Journal of Web Based Communities, ISSN 1477-8394, E-ISSN 1741-8216, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 448-464Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study used representational affordances of IT to trace meaning making as the semiotic actions of training teachers in a web-based educational practice. 18 weeks of asynchronous communications were analysed using Mediated Discourse Analysis. Results showed a process orientation in communication. Students were exposed to a variety of experiences and opinions, helping them to find ways to relate to theory. The link between theory and practice was helped by strategies as:

  • building upon the collective –from I to we
  • introducing a cultural or historical shift
  • making “different” known and shared by the group
  • revisiting earlier established concepts from the course

Results point towards the importance to address design aspects of working with the impact of other’s represented experience and ‘distance’ as representations of actions providing distance to self, practice and thought as pedagogical aspects of the web based environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Inderscience, 2013
Keywords
collaboration, meaning-making, mediated discourse analysis, MDA, participation, professional training, student strategies, higher education, web-based education
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-29056 (URN)10.1504/IJWBC.2013.057220 (DOI)2-s2.0-84886483974 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-09-26 Created: 2013-09-26 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Reneland-Forsman, L. (2012). Designing for social: – the role of social in web-based learning environments. In: Rikke Ørngreen (Ed.), DESIGNS FOR LEARNING 2012, 3rd International ConferenceExploring Learning Environments, 25-27 April 2012Copenhagen, Denmark: CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS. Paper presented at Designs for Learning"-Conference, DfL2012, 25-27 April 2012, Copenhagen (pp. 54-55).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing for social: – the role of social in web-based learning environments
2012 (English)In: DESIGNS FOR LEARNING 2012, 3rd International ConferenceExploring Learning Environments, 25-27 April 2012Copenhagen, Denmark: CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS / [ed] Rikke Ørngreen, 2012, p. 54-55Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-17964 (URN)
Conference
Designs for Learning"-Conference, DfL2012, 25-27 April 2012, Copenhagen
Available from: 2012-03-12 Created: 2012-03-12 Last updated: 2015-02-17Bibliographically approved
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