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Uddh Söderberg, Terese
Publications (10 of 13) Show all publications
Uddh Söderberg, T., Berggren Kleja, D., Åström, M. E., Jarsjö, J., Fröberg, M., Svensson, P. A. & Augustsson, A. (2019). Metal solubility and transport at a contaminated landfill site – From the source zone into the groundwater. Science of the Total Environment, 668, 1064-1076
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metal solubility and transport at a contaminated landfill site – From the source zone into the groundwater
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2019 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 668, p. 1064-1076Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Risks associated with metal contaminated sites are tightly linked to material leachability and contaminant mobility. In this study, metal solubility and transport were characterized within a glass waste landfill through i) lysimeter-collection of pore water and standardized batch leaching tests, ii) soil profiles extending from the landfill surface, through unsaturated soil underneath, and into the groundwater zone, and iii) groundwater samples upstream, at, and downstream of the landfill. The soil analyzes targeted both pseudo-total and geochemically active concentrations of contaminant metals (As, Cd, Pb, Sb) and basic soil geochemistry (pH, org. C, Fe,Mn). Water samples were analyzed for dissolved, colloid-bound and particulate metals, and speciation modelling of the aqueous phase was conducted. The results revealed a highly contaminated system, with mean metal concentrationsin the waste zone between 90 and 250 times the regional background levels. Despite severe contamination of the waste zone and high geochemically active fractions (80–100%) of all contaminant metals as well as elevated concentrations in landfill pore water, the concentrations of Cd and Pb decrease abruptly at the transition between landfill and underlying natural soil and no indication of groundwater contamination was found. The efficient cation retention is likely due to the high pH. However, the sorption of As and Sb is weaker at such high pH,which explains their higher mobility from the pore water zone into groundwater. The field soil:solution for Pb, ranging from 140 to 2,900,000 l kg−1), despite little variability in basic geochemical variables, which we suggest is due to waste material heterogeneity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Soil and groundwater metal pollution, Glass waste, Soil:Solution partitioning (Kd), Leachability, Mobility, Colloids
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81555 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.03.013 (DOI)000462776800098 ()2-s2.0-85062735396 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Geological Survey of Sweden (SGU), 36-1778/2014
Available from: 2019-04-01 Created: 2019-04-01 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Augustsson, A., Uddh Söderberg, T., Filipsson, M., Helmfrid, I., Berglund, M., Karlsson, H., . . . Alriksson, S. (2018). Challenges in assessing the health risks of consuming vegetables in metal-contaminated environments. Environment International, 113, 269-280
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenges in assessing the health risks of consuming vegetables in metal-contaminated environments
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2018 (English)In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 113, p. 269-280Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A great deal of research has been devoted to the characterization of metal exposure due to the consumption of vegetables from urban or industrialized areas. It may seem comforting that concentrations in crops, as well as estimated exposure levels, are often found to be below permissible limits. However, we show that even a moderate increase in metal accumulation in crops may result in a significant increase in exposure. We also highlight the importance of assessing exposure levels in relation to a regional baseline. We have analyzed metal (Pb, Cd, As) concentrations in nearly 700 samples from 23 different vegetables, fruits, berries and mushrooms, collected near 21 highly contaminated industrial sites and from reference sites. Metal concentrations generally complied with permissible levels in commercial food and only Pb showed overall higher concentrations around the contaminated sites. Nevertheless, probabilistic exposure assessments revealed that the exposure to all three metals was significantly higher in the population residing around the contaminated sites, for both low-, medianand high consumers. The exposure was about twice as high for Pb and Cd, and four to six times as high for As. Since vegetable consumption alone did not result in exposure above tolerable intakes, it would have been easy to conclude that there is no risk associated with consuming vegetables grown near the contaminated sites. However, when the increase in exposure is quantified, its potential significance is harder to dismiss - especially when considering that exposure via other routes may be elevated in a similar way.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Contaminated sites, Arsenic, Cadmium, Lead, Exposure, Vegetable
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-73124 (URN)10.1016/j.envint.2017.10.002 (DOI)000428976700030 ()29157867 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85034022603 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-20 Created: 2018-04-20 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Augustsson, A., Uddh Söderberg, T., Alriksson, S., Helmfrid, I., Berglund, M., Karlsson, H. & Filipsson, M. (2017). Challenges in assessing metal exposure around contaminated sites: the example of local vegetable consumption in the Swedish glassworks district. In: 26th SRA-E annual conference (SRA-E Lisbon 2017): Lisbon, Portugal, June 19-21, 2017. Paper presented at Annual conference of SRA-E (Society for Risk analysis – Europe), Lisbon, 19-21 June.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenges in assessing metal exposure around contaminated sites: the example of local vegetable consumption in the Swedish glassworks district
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2017 (English)In: 26th SRA-E annual conference (SRA-E Lisbon 2017): Lisbon, Portugal, June 19-21, 2017, 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Natural Science, Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-66022 (URN)
Conference
Annual conference of SRA-E (Society for Risk analysis – Europe), Lisbon, 19-21 June
Available from: 2017-07-01 Created: 2017-07-01 Last updated: 2018-05-18Bibliographically approved
Uddh Söderberg, T., Gunnarsson, S., Hogmalm, J., Lindegård, B. & Augustsson, A. (2016). Elevated arsenic exposure via consumption of homegrown vegetables for residents in glassworks villages.. In: : . Paper presented at AS2016: 6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment Arsenic Research and Global Sustainability. Stockholm, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elevated arsenic exposure via consumption of homegrown vegetables for residents in glassworks villages.
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2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-60963 (URN)
Conference
AS2016: 6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment Arsenic Research and Global Sustainability. Stockholm, Sweden
Note

Ej belagd 20170323

Available from: 2017-02-27 Created: 2017-02-27 Last updated: 2017-03-23Bibliographically approved
Uddh Söderberg, T., Augustsson, A., Jarsjö, J., Berggren Kleja, D., Fröberg, M. & Åström, M. E. (2016). Heavy metal transport at a contaminated glassworks site in southeast Sweden.. In: : . Paper presented at Annual NGL Conference, 10-11 October 2016, Kalmar, Sweden..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heavy metal transport at a contaminated glassworks site in southeast Sweden.
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2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Heavy metal transport at a contaminated glassworks site in southeast Sweden.

In the “Kingdom of crystal” in southeastern Sweden there are a large number of glassworks sites, which are characterized by high pollution levels of a number of metal contaminants. At Pukeberg glassworks site, which is the focus of this study, As, Ba, Cd, Pb, Sb and Zn are present in significantly elevated levels. For this study, which aim is to characterize the release of metals from the glass waste into soil water and groundwater, 54 soil samples from both saturated and unsaturated zone were gathered. Soil water were sampled from lysimeters installed on the landfill area and groundwater were collected from sampling tubes located upstream, at and downstream of the landfill area. The collected samples were analyzed and distribution coefficients (Kd) were calculated as the ratio of the average pseudo-total metal concentrations in soil (from the landfill site with visible glass) to the average dissolved metal concentrations in soil water to describe the leachability of the metal(loid) in the wastes.

High concentrations of metal(loid)s were found in soil water samples at the landfill (collected at 30 and 60 cm depth), indicating that metals are leached from the solid waste materials. The distribution coefficients indicate the highest leachability for Ba (Kd= 150 l/kg) and Sb (Kd= 190 l/kg), a moderately leachability for Cd (Kd= 860 l/kg) and Zn (Kd= 500) and the lowest leachability for As and Pb (Kd= 6000 and 16000 respectively). Examining the soil profiles shows that the metal concentrations are considerable lower when there are no visible glass wastes in the soil, which implies that the majority of leached metals are retained in the waste pile.  Significant sorption is also suggested by the low concentrations measured in the groundwater samples. The theoretical dilution of the catchment area alone, cannot explain the decrease in metal concentration between the soil water and the groundwater. With exception for Sb, that seems to move relatively unrestrained from the unsaturated zone to the saturated zone.

The results indicate that there are sorption processes involved, preventing or slowing down the transport of the investigated metals through the unsaturated zone. The responsible geochemical processes need to be established before assessing remediation strategies for the contaminated area, as it gives information on the factors controlling the metal leaching.

 

National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-60965 (URN)
Conference
Annual NGL Conference, 10-11 October 2016, Kalmar, Sweden.
Available from: 2017-02-27 Created: 2017-02-27 Last updated: 2017-04-19Bibliographically approved
Uddh Söderberg, T., Augustsson, A., Filipsson, M., Åström, M. E. & Bergbäck, B. (2016). Hur kan boende i glasriket exponeras för metaller?: Studier över föroreningsspridning och exponering vid Miljöriskgruppen på LNU. In: : . Paper presented at ”Är det farligt att bo i förorenade områden? Hur kan risker kommuniceras? Måste verksamheten läggas ner?”, Temadag av Arbets- och miljömedicin för Östergötland, Jönköping och Kalmar län, och Arbets- och miljömedicin Syd, 27 October 2016, Kalmar, Sweden..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hur kan boende i glasriket exponeras för metaller?: Studier över föroreningsspridning och exponering vid Miljöriskgruppen på LNU
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2016 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-60966 (URN)
Conference
”Är det farligt att bo i förorenade områden? Hur kan risker kommuniceras? Måste verksamheten läggas ner?”, Temadag av Arbets- och miljömedicin för Östergötland, Jönköping och Kalmar län, och Arbets- och miljömedicin Syd, 27 October 2016, Kalmar, Sweden.
Available from: 2017-02-27 Created: 2017-02-27 Last updated: 2017-04-19Bibliographically approved
Augustsson, A., Uddh Söderberg, T., Jarsjo, J., Åström, M. E., Olofsson, B., Balfors, B. & Destouni, G. (2016). The risk of overestimating the risk-metal leaching to groundwater near contaminated glass waste deposits and exposure via drinking water. Science of the Total Environment, 566, 1420-1431
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The risk of overestimating the risk-metal leaching to groundwater near contaminated glass waste deposits and exposure via drinking water
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2016 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 566, p. 1420-1431Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates metal contamination patterns and exposure to Sb, As, Ba, Cd and Pb via intake of drinking water in a region in southeastern Sweden where the production of artistic glass has resulted in a large number of contaminated sites. Despite high total concentrations of metals in soil and groundwater at the glassworks sites properties, all drinking water samples from households with private wells, located at a 30-640 m distance from a glassworks site, were below drinking water criteria from the WHO for Sb, As, Ba and Cd. A few drinking water samples showed concentrations of Pb above the WHO guideline, but As was the only element found in concentrations that could result in human exposure near toxicological reference values. An efficient retention of metals in the natural soil close to the source areas, which results in a moderate impact on local drinking water, is implied. Firstly, by the lack of significant difference in metal concentrations when comparing households located upstream and downstream of the main waste deposits, and secondly, by the lack of correlation between the metal concentration in drinking water and distance to the nearest glassworks site. However, elevated Pb and Cd concentrations in drinking water around glassworks sites when compared to regional groundwater indicate that diffuse contamination of the soils found outside the glassworks properties, and not only the glass waste landfills, may have a significant impact on groundwater quality. We further demonstrate that different mobilization patterns apply to different metals. Regarding the need to use reliable data to assess drinking water contamination and human exposure, we finally show that the conservative modelling approaches that are frequently used in routine risk assessments may result in exposure estimates many times higher than those based on measured concentrations in the drinking water that is actually being used for consumption. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Glasswork, Risk, Health effect, Metal mobility, Metal transport modelling
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-56614 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.06.003 (DOI)000381060900137 ()27318517 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84989956743 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-20 Created: 2016-09-20 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Uddh Söderberg, T., Gunnarsson, S., Hogmalm, J., Lindegård, B. & Augustsson, A. (2015). An assessment of health risks associated with arsenic exposure via consumption of homegrown vegetables near contaminated glassworks sites. Science of the Total Environment, 536, 189-197
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An assessment of health risks associated with arsenic exposure via consumption of homegrown vegetables near contaminated glassworks sites
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2015 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 536, p. 189-197Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The health risk posed by arsenic in vegetables grown in private gardens near 22 contaminated glassworks sites was investigated in this study. Firstly, vegetable (lettuce and potato) and soil samples were collected and arsenic concentrations measured to characterize the arsenic uptake in the selected crops. Secondly, a probabilistic exposure assessment was conducted to estimate the average daily intake (ADI(veg)), which was then evaluated against toxicological reference values by the calculation of hazard quotients (HQs) and cancer risks (CRs). The results show that elevated arsenic concentrations in residential garden soils are mirrored by elevated concentrations in vegetables, and that consumption of these vegetables alone may result in an unacceptable cancer risk; the calculated reasonable maximum exposure, for example, corresponded to a cancer incidence 20 times higher than the stated tolerance limit. However, the characterization of risk depends to a great extent on which toxicological reference value is used for comparison, as well as how the exposure is determined. Based on the assumptions made in the present study, the threshold levels for chronic non-carcinogenic or acute effects were not exceeded, but the cancer risks indicated highlight the need for further exposure studies, as dietary intake involves more than just homegrown vegetables and total exposure is a function of more than just one exposure pathway. In addition, glassworks sites - and contaminated sites in general - contain multiple contaminants, affecting the final and total risk.

National Category
Environmental Sciences Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-45580 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.07.018 (DOI)000361189800022 ()26204055 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84937439603 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-07-31 Created: 2015-07-31 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Augustsson, A., Uddh Söderberg, T., Hogmalm, J. & Filipsson, M. (2015). Metal uptake by homegrown vegetables: the relative importance in human health risk assessments at contaminated sites. Environmental Research, 138, 181-190
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metal uptake by homegrown vegetables: the relative importance in human health risk assessments at contaminated sites
2015 (English)In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 138, p. 181-190Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Risk assessments of contaminated land often involve the use of generic bioconcentration factors (BCFs),which express contaminant concentrations in edible plant parts as a function of the concentration in soil,in order to assess the risks associated with consumption of homegrown vegetables. This study aimed toquantify variability in BCFs and evaluate the implications of this variability for human exposure as-sessments, focusing on cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) in lettuce and potatoes sampled around 22 con-taminated glassworks sites. In addition, risks associated with measured Cd and Pb concentrations in soiland vegetable samples were characterized and a probabilistic exposure assessment was conducted toestimate the likelihood of local residents exceeding tolerable daily intakes. The results show that con-centrations in vegetables were only moderately elevated despite high concentrations in soil, and mostsamples complied with applicable foodstuff legislation. Still, the daily intake of Cd (but not Pb) wasassessed to exceed toxicological thresholds for about afifth of the study population. Bioconcentrationfactors were found to vary more than indicated by previous studies, but decreasing BCFs with increasingmetal concentrations in the soil can explain why the calculated exposure is only moderately affected bythe choice of BCF value when generic soil guideline values are exceeded and the risk may be un-acceptable.

National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-40521 (URN)10.1016/j.envres.2015.01.020 (DOI)000353011300022 ()2-s2.0-84923225541 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-02-26 Created: 2015-02-26 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Augustsson, A. & Uddh Söderberg, T. (2015). The risk with overestimating the risk – the example of metal exposure via drinking water around contaminated glassworks sites. In: The Future of Risk Analysis in the Nordic Contries: 1st Nordic Chapter Risk Conference, Lund, Sweden. Paper presented at 1st Nordic Chapter Risk Conference, Lund, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The risk with overestimating the risk – the example of metal exposure via drinking water around contaminated glassworks sites
2015 (English)In: The Future of Risk Analysis in the Nordic Contries: 1st Nordic Chapter Risk Conference, Lund, Sweden, 2015Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Large amounts of waste material with high concentrations of various metal(loid)s are common features at old glassworks sites in southeastern Sweden. As epidemiological data indicates increased health risks for local residents around these sites, questions about how exposure occurs have been raised. One important step in assessing site-specific total exposure is to quantify exposure via intake of drinking water, and the critical variable to determine here is the metal concentration in the water to be consumed. In many routine risk assessments this is, despite well-known uncertainties, done by applying conservative and simplified transport models that simulate concentrations in water abstraction wells at certain distances from the source of contamination. To assess the accuracy of such an approch, we used a probabilistic method to simulate metal concentrations in drinking water within 500 m distance from 10 heavily contaminated glassworks sites, by applying the transport equations of the Swedish EPA generic risk assessment model. Exposure was then calculated. When concentrations in drinking water were calculated using this modelling approach, the resulting exposure estimates indicated that as much as 100% of the local residents with private wells may reach a daily intake above applicable toxicological reference values. However, when assessing the risk from measured concentrations in household drinking water instead, not even the 95th percentile of the population reached the toxicological limit. It hence appears as if metals are efficiently sorbed to the solid matrix of the soil at these sites, leaving the drinking water with concentrations well below drinking water criteria. For the average risk assessor working with contaminated sites, who often lacks training in hydrogeochemistry, the contradictory results highlight the need of more realistic generic models to be used in routine assessments of water contamination and exposure via consumption of drinking water.

National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-49061 (URN)
Conference
1st Nordic Chapter Risk Conference, Lund, Sweden
Available from: 2016-01-20 Created: 2016-01-20 Last updated: 2016-05-03Bibliographically approved
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