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Majaneva, S., Fridolfsson, E., Casini, M., Legrand, C., Lindehoff, E., Margonski, P., . . . Hylander, S. (2020). Deficiency syndromes in top predators associated with large-scale changes in the Baltic Sea ecosystem. PLoS ONE, 15(1), Article ID e0227714.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deficiency syndromes in top predators associated with large-scale changes in the Baltic Sea ecosystem
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2020 (English)In: PLoS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 15, no 1, article id e0227714Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vitamin B1 (thiamin) deficiency is an issue periodically affecting a wide range of taxa worldwide. In aquatic pelagic systems, thiamin is mainly produced by bacteria and phytoplankton and is transferred to fish and birds via zooplankton, but there is no general consensus on when or why this transfer is disrupted. We focus on the occurrence in salmon (Salmo salar) of a thiamin deficiency syndrome (M74), the incidence of which is highly correlated among populations derived from different spawning rivers. Here, we show that M74 in salmon is associated with certain large-scale abiotic changes in the main common feeding area of salmon in the southern Baltic Sea. Years with high M74 incidence were characterized by stagnant periods with relatively low salinity and phosphate and silicate concentrations but high total nitrogen. Consequently, there were major changes in phytoplankton and zooplankton, with, e.g., increased abundances of Cryptophyceae, Dinophyceae, Diatomophyceae and Euglenophyceae and Acartia spp. during high M74 incidence years. The prey fish communities also had increased stocks of both herring and sprat in these years. Overall, this suggests important changes in the entire food web structure and nutritional pathways in the common feeding period during high M74 incidence years. Previous research has emphasized the importance of the abundance of planktivorous fish for the occurrence of M74. By using this 27-year time series, we expand this analysis to the entire ecosystem and discuss potential mechanisms inducing thiamin deficiency in salmon.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2020
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-91079 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0227714 (DOI)
Available from: 2020-01-21 Created: 2020-01-21 Last updated: 2020-01-31Bibliographically approved
Mattsson, L., Lindehoff, E., Olofsson, M. & Legrand, C. (2019). Boosting algal lipids: Diurnal shifts in temperature exceed the effects of nitrogen limitation. Engineering Reports, 1(5), 1-13, Article ID e12067.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Boosting algal lipids: Diurnal shifts in temperature exceed the effects of nitrogen limitation
2019 (English)In: Engineering Reports, E-ISSN 2577-8196, Vol. 1, no 5, p. 1-13, article id e12067Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Algal lipids have been observed to increase during autumn conditions (low light, low mean temperature, and diurnal shift in temperature), in large‐scale outdoor photobioreactors. In this paper, we tested the effect of diurnal shifts in temperature (DS) and nitrogen (N) limitation on algal BODIPY lipid fluorescence cell−1 (BPF). We show that DS increased BPF in algal biomass up to 28% more compared with N limitation, the standard stressor to boost neutral lipids (NL) in commercial production. Biomass yield was constant, regardless the DS range (6°C‐12°C). A combination of both stressors had an additive effect on algal BPF. A polyculture from an outdoor photobioreactor was cultivated under controlled conditions at different regimes of light, temperature, and N limitation. DSs were mimicking autumn conditions with a difference of 6°C, 10°C, and 12°C between day and night. Biomass and BPF were monitored over one to two weeks, and NLs were stained with a fluorescent marker (BODIPY) and detected with flow cytometry. Results indicate that, during autumn conditions, daily heating and cooling processes in contrast to N limitation do not challenge the trade‐off between biomass production and BPF. During seasons when day temperature is still relatively high, DSs are rapid BPF boosting stressors, while N limitation could be applied to boost BPF further during other seasons.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-91463 (URN)10.1002/eng2.12067 (DOI)
Available from: 2020-01-31 Created: 2020-01-31 Last updated: 2020-01-31Bibliographically approved
Sörenson, E., Bertos-Fortis, M., Farnelid, H., Kremp, A., Kruget, K., Lindehoff, E. & Legrand, C. (2019). Consistency in microbiomes in cultures of Alexandrium species isolated from brackish and marine waters. Environmental Microbiology Reports, 11(3), 425-433
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consistency in microbiomes in cultures of Alexandrium species isolated from brackish and marine waters
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2019 (English)In: Environmental Microbiology Reports, ISSN 1758-2229, E-ISSN 1758-2229, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 425-433Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Phytoplankton and bacteria interactions have a significant role in aquatic ecosystem functioning. Associations can range from mutualistic to parasitic, shaping biogeochemical cycles and having a direct influence on phytoplankton growth. How variations in phenotype and sampling location, affect the phytoplankton microbiome is largely unknown. A high‐resolution characterization of the bacterial community in cultures of the dinoflagellate Alexandrium was performed on strains isolated from different geographical locations and at varying anthropogenic impact levels. Microbiomes of Baltic Sea Alexandrium ostenfeldii isolates were dominated by Betaproteobacteria and were consistent over phenotypic and genotypic Alexandrium strain variation, resulting in identification of an A. ostenfeldii core microbiome. Comparisons with in situ bacterial communities showed that taxa found in this A. ostenfeldii core were specifically associated to dinoflagellate dynamics in the Baltic Sea. Microbiomes of Alexandrium tamarense and minutum, isolated from the Mediterranean Sea, differed from those of A. ostenfeldii in bacterial diversity and composition but displayed high consistency, and a core set of bacterial taxa was identified. This indicates that Alexandrium isolates with diverse phenotypes host predictable, species‐specific, core microbiomes reflecting the abiotic conditions from which they were isolated. These findings enable in‐depth studies of potential interactions occurring between Alexandrium and specific bacterial taxa.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2019
Keywords
Algae, Bacteria, Interactions, Microbiome, Baltic Sea, Alexandrium, Alger, Bakterier, Interaktioner, Microbiom, Östersjön, Alexandrium
National Category
Ecology Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Microbiology; Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81534 (URN)10.1111/1758-2229.12736 (DOI)000468000600014 ()30672139 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062772299 (Scopus ID)
Projects
EcoChange
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasEU, European Research Council, 659453EU, Horizon 2020, 659453Carl Tryggers foundation , 14:283
Available from: 2019-04-01 Created: 2019-04-01 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Jerney, J., Suikkanen, S., Lindehoff, E. & Kremp, A. (2019). Future temperature and salinity do not exert selection pressure on cyst germination of a toxic phytoplankton species. Ecology and Evolution, 9(8), 4443-4451
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Future temperature and salinity do not exert selection pressure on cyst germination of a toxic phytoplankton species
2019 (English)In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 9, no 8, p. 4443-4451Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Environmental conditions regulate the germination of phytoplankton resting stages. While some factors lead to synchronous germination, others stimulate germination of only a small fraction of the resting stages. This suggests that habitat filters may act on the germination level and thus affect selection of blooming strains. Benthic “seed banks” of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium ostenfeldii from the Baltic Sea are genetically and phenotypically diverse, indicating a high potential for adaptation by selection on standing genetic variation. Here, we experimentally tested the role of climate-related salinity and temperature as selection filters during germination and subsequent establishment of A. ostenfeldii strains. A representative resting cyst population was isolated from sediment samples, and germination and reciprocal transplantation experiments were carried out, including four treatments: Average present day germination conditions and three potential future conditions: high temperature, low salinity, and high temperature in combination with low salinity. We found that the final germination success of A. ostenfeldii resting cysts was unaffected by temperature and salinity in the range tested. A high germination success of more than 80% in all treatments indicates that strains are not selected by temperature and salinity during germination, but selection becomes more important shortly after germination, in the vegetative stage of the life cycle. Moreover, strains were not adapted to germination conditions. Instead, highly plastic responses occurred after transplantation and significantly higher growth rates were observed at higher temperature. High variability of strain-specific responses has probably masked the overall effect of the treatments, highlighting the importance of testing the effect of environmental factors on many strains. It is likely that A. ostenfeldii populations can persist in the future, because suitable strains, which are able to germinate and grow well at potential future climate conditions, are part of the highly diverse cyst population. OPEN RESEARCH BADGES: This article has earned an Open Data Badge for making publicly available the digitally-shareable data necessary to reproduce the reported results. The data is available at https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.c8c83nr. © 2019 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
adaptation, Alexandrium ostenfeldii, climate change, dinoflagellates, excystment, resting stage
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-82799 (URN)10.1002/ece3.5009 (DOI)000466104200012 ()31031918 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85064806969 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-23 Created: 2019-05-23 Last updated: 2019-06-13Bibliographically approved
Bunse, C., Israelsson, S., Baltar, F., Bertos-Fortis, M., Fridolfsson, E., Legrand, C., . . . Pinhassi, J. (2019). High Frequency Multi-Year Variability in Baltic Sea Microbial Plankton Stocks and Activities. Frontiers in Microbiology, 9, Article ID 3296.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High Frequency Multi-Year Variability in Baltic Sea Microbial Plankton Stocks and Activities
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2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 9, article id 3296Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Marine bacterioplankton are essential in global nutrient cycling and organic matter turnover. Time-series analyses, often at monthly sampling frequencies, have established the paramount role of abiotic and biotic variables in structuring bacterioplankton communities and productivities. However, fine-scale seasonal microbial activities, and underlying biological principles, are not fully understood. We report results from four consecutive years of high-frequency time-series sampling in the Baltic Proper. Pronounced temporal dynamics in most investigated microbial variables were observed, including bacterial heterotrophic production, plankton biomass, extracellular enzyme activities, substrate uptake rate constants of glucose, pyruvate, acetate, amino acids, and leucine, as well as nutrient limitation bioassays. Spring blooms consisting of diatoms and dinoflagellates were followed by elevated bacterial heterotrophic production and abundances. During summer, bacterial productivity estimates increased even further, coinciding with an initial cyanobacterial bloom in early July. However, bacterial abundances only increased following a second cyanobacterial bloom, peaking in August. Uptake rate constants for the different measured carbon compounds varied seasonally and inter-annually and were highly correlated to bacterial productivity estimates, temperature, and cyanobacterial abundances. Further, we detected nutrient limitation in response to environmental conditions in a multitude of microbial variables, such as elevated productivities in nutrient bioassays, changes in enzymatic activities, or substrate preferences. Variations among biotic variables often occurred on time scales of days to a few weeks, yet often spanning several sampling occasions. Such dynamics might not have been captured by sampling at monthly intervals, as compared to more predictable transitions in abiotic variables such as temperature or nutrient concentrations. Our study indicates that high resolution analyses of microbial biomass and productivity parameters can help out in the development of biogeochemical and food web models disentangling the microbial black box.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
marine bacteria, phytoplankton, cyanobacteria, production, substrate uptake, enzyme activity, biogeochemistry
National Category
Microbiology Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Microbiology; Ecology, Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-80150 (URN)10.3389/fmicb.2018.03296 (DOI)000455948100001 ()2-s2.0-85064405301 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-02-05 Created: 2019-02-05 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Olofsson, M., Lindehoff, E. & Legrand, C. (2019). Production stability and biomass quality in microalgal cultivation: contribution of community dynamics. Engineering in Life Sciences, 19(5), 330-340
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Production stability and biomass quality in microalgal cultivation: contribution of community dynamics
2019 (English)In: Engineering in Life Sciences, ISSN 1618-0240, E-ISSN 1618-2863, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 330-340Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The prospect of using constructed communities of microalgae in algal cultivation wasconfirmed in this study. Three constructed communities of diatoms (Diatom), greenalgae (Green) and cyanobacteria (Cyano), were each mixed with a natural communityof microalgae as baseline. The communities were cultivated in batch and semicontinuousmode and fed CO2 or cement flue gas (12-15 % CO2). Diatom had thehighest growth rate but Green had the highest yield. Dynamic changes in thecommunity composition occurred from start through batch to semi-steady state. Greenalgae were the most competitive group during the experiment. Euglenoids wererecruited from scarce species in the natural community and became a large part of thebiomass in semi-steady state in all communities. High temporal and yield stabilitywas demonstrated in all communities during semi-steady state. Biochemicalcomposition (lipids, proteins and carbohydrates) was similar for the threecommunities with lipids ranging 14-26 % of dry weight (DW), proteins (15-28 %DW) and carbohydrates (9-23 % DW). Filamentous cyanobacteria were outcompetedearly in the experiment. However, their minute presence in Cyano associated withhigher lipid and lower carbohydrates compared to Diatom and Green, suggesting theimportance of chemical interactions among microorganisms. Our results indicate thatculture functions (stability, biomass quality) were maintained while dynamic changesoccurred in community composition. We propose that a multi-species communityapproach can aid sustainability in microalgal cultivation, through complementary useof resources and higher culture stability. Local environmental conditions,complementary microalgal traits, and interactions among functional groups (algae,bacteria) should be considered in community design where natural succession andcrop rotation will likely provide stability for commercial-scale algal cultivation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
Microalgae, multi-species communities, production stability, algal cultivation, biomass composition, flue gas
National Category
Biological Sciences Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology; Chemistry, Biotechnology; Environmental Science, Environmental technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-46511 (URN)10.1002/elsc.201900015 (DOI)000472189900001 ()2-s2.0-85063427279 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-09-28 Created: 2015-09-28 Last updated: 2019-07-17Bibliographically approved
Fridolfsson, E., Bunse, C., Legrand, C., Lindehoff, E., Majaneva, S. & Hylander, S. (2019). Seasonal variation and species-specific concentrations of the essential vitamin B₁ (thiamin) in zooplankton and seston. Marine Biology, 166(6), 1-13, Article ID 70.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Seasonal variation and species-specific concentrations of the essential vitamin B₁ (thiamin) in zooplankton and seston
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2019 (English)In: Marine Biology, ISSN 0025-3162, E-ISSN 1432-1793, Vol. 166, no 6, p. 1-13, article id 70Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Thiamin (vitamin B1) is mainly produced by bacteria and phytoplankton and then transferred to zooplankton and higher trophic levels but knowledge on the dynamics of these processes in aquatic ecosystems is lacking. Hence, the seasonal variation in thiamin content was assessed in field samples of copepods and in pico-, nano- and micro-plankton of two size classes (0.7–3 µm and > 3 µm) collected monthly in the Baltic Sea during 3 years and in the Skagerrak during 1 year. Copepods exhibited species-specific concentrations of thiamin and Acartia sp. had the highest carbon-specific thiamin content, at both locations. Even members of the same genus, but from different systems contained different levels of thiamin, with higher thiamin content per specimen in copepods from the Skagerrak compared to congeners from the Baltic Sea. Furthermore, our results show that the small plankton (0.7–3 µm) had a higher carbon-specific thiamin content compared to the large (> 3 µm). Additionally, there was a large seasonal variation and thiamin content was highly correlated comparing the two size fractions. Finally, there was an overall positive correlation between thiamin content in copepods and plankton. However, for periods of high thiamin content in the two size fractions, this correlation was negative. This suggests a decoupling between thiamin availability in pico-, nano- and micro-plankton and zooplankton in the Baltic Sea. Knowledge about concentrations of this essential micronutrient in the aquatic food web is limited and this study constitutes a foundation for further understanding the dynamics of thiamin in aquatic environments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Springer, 2019
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-82081 (URN)10.1007/s00227-019-3520-6 (DOI)000467561000005 ()2-s2.0-85065572171 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-23 Created: 2019-04-23 Last updated: 2019-11-15Bibliographically approved
Lindehoff, E. & Olofsson, M. (2018). ALGOLAND – Recovery: avfall används för att producera en värdefull produkt - algbiomassa. In: Presented at the Algoland 2030 Workshop, Kalmar, Sweden, April 24, 2018: . Paper presented at Algoland 2030 Workshop, Kalmar, Sweden, April 24, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ALGOLAND – Recovery: avfall används för att producera en värdefull produkt - algbiomassa
2018 (Swedish)In: Presented at the Algoland 2030 Workshop, Kalmar, Sweden, April 24, 2018, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-73785 (URN)
Conference
Algoland 2030 Workshop, Kalmar, Sweden, April 24, 2018
Projects
EcochangeAlgoland
Available from: 2018-05-03 Created: 2018-05-03 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved
Lindehoff, E. (2018). ALGOLAND: Industry and Ecology Together. In: : . Paper presented at Stockholm Diplomat Corps Visit to Linnaeus University, 15 May 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ALGOLAND: Industry and Ecology Together
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Keywords
Baltic sea, carbon dioxide, nutrient, eutrophication, algae, microalgae, climate change, global warming, industry, Östersjön, hållbarhet, alger, mikroalger, koldioxid, climate change, global warming, industri, cementa, KSRR, Kalmar Energi
National Category
Ecology Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology; Ecology, Aquatic Ecology; Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-74721 (URN)
Conference
Stockholm Diplomat Corps Visit to Linnaeus University, 15 May 2018
Projects
AlgolandEcoChange
Note

Ej belagd 20180720

Available from: 2018-05-30 Created: 2018-05-30 Last updated: 2018-07-20Bibliographically approved
Lindehoff, E. (2018). ALGOLAND återvinner näring och CO2 från industriutsläpp för att producera en värdefull produkt, mikroalger. In: : . Paper presented at KSRR (Kalmarsundsregionens Renhållare) Styrelse, 25 maj 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ALGOLAND återvinner näring och CO2 från industriutsläpp för att producera en värdefull produkt, mikroalger
2018 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Keywords
baltic sea, carbon dioxide, nutrient, eutrophication, algae, microalgae, climate change, global warming, industry, östersjön, hållbarhet, alger, mikroalger, koldioxid, climate change, global warming, industri, cementa, KSRR
National Category
Ecology Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology; Natural Science, Ecology; Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-74720 (URN)
Conference
KSRR (Kalmarsundsregionens Renhållare) Styrelse, 25 maj 2018
Projects
AlgolandEcoChange
Note

Presented at conference of Kalmarsundsregionens Renhållare, KSRR, university-industry collaboration for a healthier Baltic Sea region, May 25th 2018.

Ej belagd 20180720

Available from: 2018-05-30 Created: 2018-05-30 Last updated: 2018-07-20Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1149-6852

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