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Folkesson, Anne-MariORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4221-3464
Publications (10 of 30) Show all publications
Lindahl, M., Folkesson, A.-M. & Zeidler, D. L. (2019). Students' recognition of educational demands in the context of a socioscientific issues curriculum. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 56(9), 1155-1182
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Students' recognition of educational demands in the context of a socioscientific issues curriculum
2019 (English)In: Journal of Research in Science Teaching, ISSN 0022-4308, E-ISSN 1098-2736, Vol. 56, no 9, p. 1155-1182Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Students’ difficulties in interpreting what counts as knowledge have been addressed in past research on science education. The implementation of progressivist pedagogy in terms of more student-active classroom practice and the introduction of a variety of discourses into the science classroom deepens students’ difficulties.The integration of different forms and demands of knowledge and discourses typified by Science-in-Context initiatives, such as within the Socioscientific framework, exemplifies this development in science education. Here, the diffuse boundaries between school subjects and other silos of knowledge leads to considerable difficulties for students to interpret what is expected from them. Such contexts having diffuse boundaries between, for example, subject discourses and other fonts of knowledge, have been describes as contexts with weak classification. The present study aims to explore students’ interpretation of what knowledge or meaning they are requested to produce in contexts with weak classification, here exemplified withinan SSI-task. We use Bernstein’s concepts of recognition rulesand classificationto analyse how 15-16 year-old students develop their discussions in groups of 4-6 students. This study reports how students’ recognitionof the educational demands enabled integration of different discourses in their discussion, and that the use of both universalistic and particularistic meanings can produce new understandings. Students who had not acquired recognition ruleswere found to keep discourses apart, expressed either as rejection of the relevance of the task, answering questions as in a traditional school task, or just exchange of personal opinions. Furthermore, they included discourses irrelevant to the issue.An important outcome of the study was that socioscientific thinking was hampered when students kept universalistic and particularistic meanings apart. This hampering results from the inhibition of dynamic exploration during SSI discussions. The results provide new insights with relevance for teachers’ guiding students towards a fruitful SSI-discourse.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New Jersey, USA: John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
critical thinking, discourse analysis, science literacy, socioscientific issues
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
Natural Science, Science Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81338 (URN)10.1002/tea.21548 (DOI)000491334900001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2011-34409-85898-21
Available from: 2019-03-26 Created: 2019-03-26 Last updated: 2019-12-12Bibliographically approved
Lindahl, M., Folkesson, A.-M. & Zeidler, D. (2017). Students' recognition of the educational demands in a socioscientific issue task. In: Research, Practice and Collaboration in Science Education: . Paper presented at European Science Education Research Association (ESERA) 2017, Dublin, Ireland.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Students' recognition of the educational demands in a socioscientific issue task
2017 (English)In: Research, Practice and Collaboration in Science Education, 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Students’ difficulties in interpreting what counts as knowledge have been addressed in past educational research. As curricula have changed towards progressivist pedagogy the difficulties have deepened. The Socioscientific Issues framework exemplifies this development. It integrates different knowledges and discourses, implying diffuse boundaries between them, which in turn deepen students’ difficulties to interpret what is expected from them. Our aim is to explore students’ recognition of what meaning they are requested to produce in a context with weak boundaries between discourses. We use Bernstein’s concepts of recognition rules and classification to analyse how 15-16 year-old students develop their discussions in groups of 4-6 students. Students recognizing the educational demands integrate different discourses in their discussion and use both universalistic and particularistic meanings to produce new understandings. Students who do not understand the recognition rules keep discourses apart as in a traditional school task, answering questions or just exchanging personal opinions. And, by keeping universalistic and particularistic meanings apart the dynamics of an exploring SSI discussion is inhibited and the development of socioscientific reasoning is inhibited.

Keywords
Socioscientific Issues, discourse integration, educational demands
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
Natural Science, Science Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77954 (URN)
Conference
European Science Education Research Association (ESERA) 2017, Dublin, Ireland
Available from: 2018-09-24 Created: 2018-09-24 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved
Folkesson, A.-M. (2016). Att leda förskolebarn med respekt: Fallstudie av en samling med åtta 1-3-åringar (1ed.). In: Anette Emilson & Ingeborg Moqvist-Lindberg (Ed.), Värdefull förskola: Perspektiv på värdepedagogiskt arbete (pp. 129-153). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Att leda förskolebarn med respekt: Fallstudie av en samling med åtta 1-3-åringar
2016 (Swedish)In: Värdefull förskola: Perspektiv på värdepedagogiskt arbete / [ed] Anette Emilson & Ingeborg Moqvist-Lindberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2016, 1, p. 129-153Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2016 Edition: 1
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, General Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-61598 (URN)978-91-44-11101-8 (ISBN)
Projects
Values Education in Nordic Preschools
Funder
Nordic Council of Ministers
Available from: 2017-03-21 Created: 2017-03-21 Last updated: 2017-03-22Bibliographically approved
Lindahl, M. & Folkesson, A.-M. (2016). Attitude and language use in peer-group discussions and the impact on students’ texts. In: Kroppsligt lärande i naturvetenskaplig undervisning. FND 2016, Forskning i Naturvetenskapernas Didaktik, 9-10 November, Falun, 2016: . Paper presented at FND 2016, Forskning i Naturvetenskapernas Didaktik, 9-10 November, Falun, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attitude and language use in peer-group discussions and the impact on students’ texts
2016 (English)In: Kroppsligt lärande i naturvetenskaplig undervisning. FND 2016, Forskning i Naturvetenskapernas Didaktik, 9-10 November, Falun, 2016, 2016Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Keywords
attitude, language, SSI, group discussion, text
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-58622 (URN)
Conference
FND 2016, Forskning i Naturvetenskapernas Didaktik, 9-10 November, Falun, 2016
Projects
Understanding the Formation of Scientific Literacy Through Socioscientific Issues: A Study of Student Discourse and Reasoning Capabilities
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note

Ej belagd 161202

Available from: 2016-12-01 Created: 2016-12-01 Last updated: 2017-01-11Bibliographically approved
Lindahl, M. & Folkesson, A.-M. (2016). Attitudes and Language Use in Group Discussions on Socio-Scientific Issues. urasia Journal of Mathematics, Science and Technology Education, 12(2), 283-301
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attitudes and Language Use in Group Discussions on Socio-Scientific Issues
2016 (English)In: urasia Journal of Mathematics, Science and Technology Education, ISSN 1305-8215, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 283-301Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The school systems of many countries have been pervaded by student-centred pedagogy making students’ small group discussion a common feature of the classroom practice. However, there is a lack of studies focussing different modes of discussion for the purpose of finding out whether some modes are more beneficial than others. Hence, the aim of this study is to explore the underpinnings of student small group conversations on Socio-scientific Issues in order to develop an understanding of the key aspects of what interrupts or revitalizes the conversation. We focus on the importance of attitudes and language use for the fate of students’ decision-making conversations. Our theoretical framework builds on Dewey’s notion of Open-mindedness and Bernstein’s communication codes. Students’ use of morals, opinions and agitational talk interrupted conversations, whereas new aspects and new perspectives revitalized the conversation. Students need guidance to avoid using justifications in conjunction with a Close-minded attitude.

Keywords
attitude, critical thinking, elaborated code, group discussion, open-mindedness, socio-scientific issues
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
Natural Science, Science Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-49677 (URN)10.12973/eurasia.2016.1214a (DOI)000369554600007 ()2-s2.0-84957864703 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Understanding the formation of Scientific Literacy through Socioscientific Issues: A study of student discourse and reasoning capabilities
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2011-34409-85898-21
Available from: 2016-02-10 Created: 2016-02-10 Last updated: 2019-05-24Bibliographically approved
Emilson, A., Folkesson, A.-M. & Moqvist-Lindberg, I. (2016). Gender Beliefs and Embedded Gendered Values in Preschool. International Journal of Early Childhood, 48(2), 225-240
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender Beliefs and Embedded Gendered Values in Preschool
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Early Childhood, ISSN 0020-7187, E-ISSN 1878-4658, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 225-240Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study is to explore practitioners' gender beliefs and how gendered values are embedded in Swedish preschool practice. The research question is: What beliefs about gender and the associated values, can be identified in practitioners' talk when they discuss gender issues? The study is informed by Bronwyn Davies' theoretical ideas that gender is socially constructed and her concepts of category maintenance and transgression are discussed. Data were analysed from 10 semistructured group interviews with practitioners in eight Swedish preschools. A content analysis was conducted that identified two main categories of beliefs, duality and gender-neutral beliefs. Primarily, the practitioners believed in gender neutrality whereby preschool is an arena in which traditional gendered behaviour are not promoted. However, value dilemmas embedded in the practitioners' gender beliefs also emerged. One dilemma concerned ideas that gender is primarily a social construction versus ideas that gender is determined by biology. Another dilemma was related to the implementation of curriculum goals whereby, on one hand, practitioners struggled to influence children not to subscribe to gendered stereotypes and to promote gender equality and, on the other hand, to take the child's perspective into account but work to influence non-gendered participation. Additionally, while boys were encouraged to embrace femininity, girls were paradoxically encouraged to reject femininity. It remains important to research values about gender in preschool education and to increase practitioners' awareness of their gendered practices in classrooms.

Keywords
gender beliefs, values, preschool, category-maintenance, transgression
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-50803 (URN)10.1007/s13158-016-0162-4 (DOI)2-s2.0-84983591470 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-03-16 Created: 2016-03-16 Last updated: 2019-05-13Bibliographically approved
Lindahl, M. & Folkesson, A.-M. (2016). On attitude and language in students’ talk and their impact on students’ texts.. Eurasia Journal of Mathematics, Science and Technology Education, 12(8), 2199-2221
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On attitude and language in students’ talk and their impact on students’ texts.
2016 (English)In: Eurasia Journal of Mathematics, Science and Technology Education, ISSN 1305-8215, Vol. 12, no 8, p. 2199-2221Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Students’ learning is assumed to be promoted through peer-group discussion. Most studies show the presence of qualitative improvements in either oral or written reasoning as a result of such interactions. However, knowledge on the relationship between talk qualities and text qualities is scarce. We adopt an explorative design using statistical analyses of students’ talk and texts to estimate the relationships between theoretically-based concepts of attitude and sociolinguistic code. The operationalized concepts can be validated using statistical analyses. Linear regression shows that Elaborated code in students’ talk has no impact on students’ texts. Furthermore, Restricted code in talk is detrimental to students’ use of Elaborated code in texts. This relationship is also found at the group level. Students’ expression of open-mindedness in their texts depends on their use of Elaborated code. Teachers must support students in using Elaborated code in their texts and avoiding Restricted code in their talk.

Keywords
group discussion, open-minded, elaborated code, socio-scientific issues, writing
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
Natural Science, Science Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-52496 (URN)10.12973/eurasia.2016.1247a (DOI)000378924000015 ()
Projects
Understanding the formation of Scientific Literacy through Socioscientific Issues: A study of student discourse and reasoning capabilities
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-05-15 Created: 2016-05-15 Last updated: 2019-05-24Bibliographically approved
Lindahl, M. & Folkesson, A.-M. (2015). Attitudes and language shaping the SSI discussion. In: ESERA 2015, The 11th Biannual Conference of the European Science Education Research Association (ESERA): Science Education Research: Engaging learners for a sustainable future.. Paper presented at ESERA 2015, The 11th Biannual Conference of the European Science Education Research Association (ESERA), Helsinki, August 31 - September 4, 2015..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attitudes and language shaping the SSI discussion
2015 (English)In: ESERA 2015, The 11th Biannual Conference of the European Science Education Research Association (ESERA): Science Education Research: Engaging learners for a sustainable future., 2015Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The use of Socio-scientific Issues (SSI) in science education aiming at fostering critical thinking and decision-making capacities is known to develop the quality of students’ socio-scientific arguments. Teachers scaffolding has been shown to be important for the quality of students’ reasoning. Although students’ untutored socio-scientific discussions are recognized as important for reasoning quality, little is known about these interactions among peers. Such information is crucial for further development of teachers’ scaffolding. The aim of this study is to explore the underpinnings of student discussions on SSI in order to develop understanding for key aspects with importance for the faith of students’ decision-making conversation. Data were transcribed discussions from 4 groups of Swedish high-school students discussing “Wolves in Sweden and biodiversity”. Our theoretical framework builds on Dewey’s notion of Open-mindedness and Bernstein’s communication codes. Students’ inputs interrupting or re-vitalizing conversations were coded as Open-minded/Close-minded (OM/CM) and Elaborated/Restricted code (Ec/Rc) and their functions interpreted. In some utterances (Morals and Agitational talk) the use of Ec were found to interrupt or narrow the conversation. CM utterances (Morals and Opinions) typically interrupted conversation, something that has to be counteracted by teachers by encouraging students’ Open-mindedness in order to promote a multifaceted informal socio-scientific discussion.

National Category
Didactics
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-48246 (URN)
Conference
ESERA 2015, The 11th Biannual Conference of the European Science Education Research Association (ESERA), Helsinki, August 31 - September 4, 2015.
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2015-12-07 Created: 2015-12-07 Last updated: 2017-01-11Bibliographically approved
Lindahl, M. & Folkesson, A.-M. (2015). Attitudes and Language Use in Group Discussions on Socio-Scientific Issues. In: NARST 2015, Annual International Conference of National Association for Research in Science Teaching: Becoming Next Generation Science Educators in an Era of Global Science Education Reform. Paper presented at NARST 2015, Annual International Conference of National Association for Research in Science Teaching, Chicago, Illinois, USA, April 11-15, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attitudes and Language Use in Group Discussions on Socio-Scientific Issues
2015 (English)In: NARST 2015, Annual International Conference of National Association for Research in Science Teaching: Becoming Next Generation Science Educators in an Era of Global Science Education Reform, 2015Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The use of Socio-scientific Issues (SSI) in science education aiming at fostering critical thinking and decision-making capacities is known to develop the quality of students’ socio-scientific arguments. Teachers scaffolding has been shown to be important for the quality of students’ reasoning. Although students’ untutored socio-scientific discussions are recognized as important for reasoning quality, little is known about these interactions among peers. Such information is crucial for further development of teachers’ scaffolding. The aim of this study is to explore the underpinnings of student discussions on SSI in order to develop understanding for key aspects with importance for the faith of students’ decision-making conversation. Data were transcribed discussions from 4 groups of Swedish high-school students discussing “Wolves in Sweden and biodiversity”. Our theoretical framework builds on Dewey’s notion of Open-mindedness and Bernstein’s communication codes. Students’ inputs interrupting or re-vitalizing conversations were coded as Open-minded/Close-minded (OM/CM) and Elaborated/Restricted code (Ec/Rc) and their functions interpreted. In some utterances (Morals and Agitational talk) the use of Ec were found to interrupt or narrow the conversation. CM utterances (Morals and Opinions) typically interrupted conversation, something that has to be counteracted by teachers by encouraging students’ Open-mindedness in order to promote a multifaceted informal socio-scientific discussion.

Keywords
Socio-scientific issues; Attitude; Group discussion; Critical thinking; Open-mindedness; Elaborated code
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
Natural Science, Science Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-42917 (URN)
Conference
NARST 2015, Annual International Conference of National Association for Research in Science Teaching, Chicago, Illinois, USA, April 11-15, 2015
Projects
Understanding the Formation of Scientific Literacy Through Socioscientific Issues: A Study of Student Discourse and Reasoning Capabilities
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2015-04-29 Created: 2015-04-29 Last updated: 2017-01-11Bibliographically approved
Lindahl, M. & Folkesson, A.-M. (2012). Can we let computers change practice? Educators’ interpretations of preschool tradition. Computers in human behavior, 28(5), 1728-1737
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can we let computers change practice? Educators’ interpretations of preschool tradition
2012 (English)In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 1728-1737Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The introduction of ICT into preschool practice is generally lagging. However, there is a variation regarding use of new technology. Hence, the aim of this study is to analyze which are the possibilities and difficulties to embed computers into preschool practice. Data consists of naturalistic texts from 31 preschool teacher students revealing their experiences from trying to embed computers into practice. Analysis of data was guided by a framework adapted from Giddens’ structuration theory, focussing on students’ drawing on tradition and on knowledge claims when justifying their stances. Results show ambivalence to computer use. However, two groups of students emerged. One group embraced the new technology, whereas the other group conceived new technology as a threat to tradition. Depending on how activities are interpreted to fit into preschool tradition, using computers can or cannot be justified. Understanding tradition, as partially values and partially routines, provides possibilities to modify preschool practice to include computer activities. Knowledge claims, for example pertaining to developmental stimulation, can also be used as justifications for embedding computers into preschool practice. If, however, values appear to be threatened, tradition as well as knowledge claims can be used to justify protection against using computers in preschool practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2012
Keywords
Attitude, Computer, Knowledge claim, Preschool, Tradition, Values
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
Computer and Information Sciences Computer Science; Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, General Didactics; Natural Science, Science Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-21314 (URN)10.1016/j.chb.2012.04.012 (DOI)2-s2.0-84863718469 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-08-27 Created: 2012-08-27 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4221-3464

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