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Lindeblad, E., Nilsson, S., Gustafson, S. & Svensson, I. (2019). Self-concepts and psychological health in children and adolescents with reading difficulties and the impact of assistive technology to compensate and facilitate reading ability. Cogent Psychology, 6(1), 1-18, Article ID 1647601.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-concepts and psychological health in children and adolescents with reading difficulties and the impact of assistive technology to compensate and facilitate reading ability
2019 (English)In: Cogent Psychology, E-ISSN 2331-1908, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 1-18, article id 1647601Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated self-image, psychological health, and the impact of Assistive Technology (AT) on self-concept and psychological health in 137 children and adolescents with reading difficulties during a systematic intervention program and in a one-year follow-up. Participants were randomly assigned to a control or an intervention group. The interventions aimed to teach participants how to understand texts using AT. The control group received no intervention. To investigate self-esteem, self-image, anxiety, and depression, all participants were assessed with the Cultural Free Self-Esteem Inventory, 3rd edition (CFSEI-3) before intervention and one year post-interventions. Forty-one participants were also assessed on the Beck Youth Inventory (BYI). The AT was found to have no impact on participants' self-esteem. The CFSEI-3 showed similar values for self-esteem in a norm group and the study groups at pre-intervention, which made an increase from using AT less expected. The results are discussed in terms of contextual explanatory factors, such as educators' increased knowledge of reading difficulties and dyslexia. The results on the BYI were somewhat inconclusive since the younger group of participants showed more anxiety than the norm group, but the adolescent group did not. This may be due to small sample size, so further research is recommended.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Keywords
Dyslexia, self-esteem, assistive technology, children, adolescents, self image, special education
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-88838 (URN)10.1080/23311908.2019.1647601 (DOI)000480244000001 ()
Available from: 2019-08-29 Created: 2019-08-29 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Svensson, I., Fälth, L., Tjus, T., Mikael, H. & Stefan, G. (2019). Two-step tier three interventions for children in grade three with low reading fluency. Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, 19(1), 3-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Two-step tier three interventions for children in grade three with low reading fluency
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, ISSN 1471-3802, E-ISSN 1471-3802, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 3-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The main aim of this study was to investigate theeffect of a tier three intervention, response-tointerventiondesign, on children with low readingability in grade three. Twenty-eight children (12females and 16 males) participated in this study.The participants were given out a battery of readingtests including decoding and reading comprehensiontests, and in total, the children received20 reading intervention sessions in two waves, during4 weeks. The results showed substantial gainswith large effect sizes (d 0.78–2.95) on all thereading tests after the intervention period. A short,intensive and individualised intervention has a substantiallypositive effect on children’s reading ability.For a majority of the children, the increasedability sustains even 4 years after the end of theinterventions. However, as boys seem to have thegreatest problem to sustain their increased ability,the authors claim that it is important to continuethe intervention even after the research interventionshave ended.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2019
Keywords
RTI, intervention, reading disabilities, dyslexia, gender differences.
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77520 (URN)10.1111/1471-3802.12419 (DOI)000456573900001 ()2-s2.0-85047627446 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-01 Created: 2018-09-01 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Nordström, T., Nilsson, S., Gustafson, S. & Svensson, I. (2018). Assistive technology applications for students with reading difficulties: special education teacher’s experiences and perceptions. Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assistive technology applications for students with reading difficulties: special education teacher’s experiences and perceptions
2018 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Reading and writing applications (with text-to-speech, TTS and speech-to-text, STT functions), used as assistive technology (AT) for students with reading difficulties are increasingly used in education, however, research has not sufficiently enough evaluated its potential. The purpose of this study was to explore how assistive reading and writing applications were perceived to function with regard to students’ possibilities to assimilate (i.e., “read”) and communicate (i.e., “write”) text.

Methods: Following a six-week app intervention, this follow-up survey contained 54 special education teachers’ perceptions of how the use of apps impacted student motivation, learning, and its usability in special education. A total of 59 students with reading difficulties from Grade 4, Grade 8 and from high school, were assessed. Analyses included quantitative and qualitative analyses of teachers’ responses and written material.

Results: The results showed individual differences in how teachers perceived app usage for text-interaction purposes, including how app usage affected student motivation and autonomy for text-based learning. Eighty-two per cent of the younger and forty-seven per cent of older students continued to use the technology after the intervention, but in various degrees.

Conclusions: Based on these findings, students with reading difficulties seem to be able to use AT in order to assimilate text (i.e., to read) and to communicate text (i.e., to write), and, thus, AT has the potential to promote participation in regular education. Future research should focus on how to customize assistive technology support in order to better utilize the potential.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Reading difficulties, assistive technology, intervention, special education
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology; Education, Special Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77935 (URN)10.1080/17483107.2018.1499142 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-09-22 Created: 2018-09-22 Last updated: 2018-12-03Bibliographically approved
Lindeblad, E., Nilsson, S., Gustafson, S. & Svensson, I. (2017). Assistive technology as reading interventions for children with reading impairments with a one-year follow-up. Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 12(7), 713-724
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assistive technology as reading interventions for children with reading impairments with a one-year follow-up
2017 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 713-724Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: This pilot study investigated the possible transfer effect on reading ability in children with reading difficulties after a systematic intervention to train and compensate for reading deficiencies by using applications in smartphones and tablets. The effects of using assistive technology (AT) one year after the interventions were completely studied. School related motivation, independent learning and family relations were also considered.

METHOD: 35 pupils aged 10-12 years participated. They were assessed five times with reading tests. The participants, their parents and teachers were surveyed with questionnaires regarding their experience of using AT. The data from the assessments were analyzed with paired t-tests and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. The data from the questionnaires were analyzed using content analysis.

RESULTS: The paper shows that using AT can create transfer effects on reading ability one year after the interventions were finished. This means that reading impaired children may develop at the same rate as non-impaired readers. Also, increased school motivation and an increase in independent learning and family effects have been shown.

CONCLUSIONS: This paper provides implications in how to facilitate reading impaired pupils' learning process and realizes the need to challenge the concept of reading to change to fit modern means of gaining information. Implications for rehabilitation Children with reading impairment could benefit from assistive technology in regards of their reading development process and increase their chances of not falling behind peers. Assistive technology as applications in smartphones and tablets may aid children with reading impairment to have an equal platform for learning in school as their peers without reading difficulties. Assistive technology could facilitate the information gaining process and subsequently increase motivation to learn and increase interest in reading activities. Assistive technology had wider effects on its users: stigmatizing situations when leaving the classroom for special education were avoided and positive effects on family life were noted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Assistive technology, Dyslexia, Independent learning, Reading development, Reading impairment, School motivation, Smartphone, Tablets
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-62263 (URN)10.1080/17483107.2016.1253116 (DOI)000418490800007 ()27924656 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85002486047 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-04-12 Created: 2017-04-12 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Johansson, M., Svensson, I., Stenström, U. & Massoudi, P. (2017). Depressive Symptoms and Parental Stress in Mothers and Fathers 25 Months after birth. Journal of Child Health Care, 21(1), 65-73
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Depressive Symptoms and Parental Stress in Mothers and Fathers 25 Months after birth
2017 (English)In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 65-73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of depressive symptoms, feelings of incompetence and spouse relationship problems and their mutual relations. Data from a Swedish parent–infant population-based cohort 25 months after childbirth was used. A questionnaire containing Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and a modified Swedish Parental Stress Questionnaire (SPSQ) regarding depression and parental stress was answered by 646 fathers and 700 mothers. Parents with depressive symptoms experienced more feelings of incompetence and spouse relationship problems than parents without depressive symptoms. The prevalence of depressive symptoms (EPDS 􏰀 12) was more than11% for mothers and nearly 5% for fathers in the sample, 25 months after childbirth. The result indicated that feelings of incompetence and spouse relationship problems could be important constructs for understanding parental stress and depressive symptoms in the parents of young children. In conclusion, it is important that Child Health Care is attentive to both mothers’ and fathers’ depressive symptoms and parental stress after the first year.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
Depressive symptoms, parent–child relationship, parent–spouse, parental stress
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-59549 (URN)10.1177/1367493516679015 (DOI)000397413600008 ()2-s2.0-85034617692 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-29 Created: 2016-12-29 Last updated: 2019-09-02Bibliographically approved
Fälth, L. & Svensson, I. (2017). Erfarenheter av skolmisslyckande – forskningsresultat från en psykiatrisk klinik och LVM-hem.. In: : . Paper presented at Att förebygga skolmisslyckanden- Nätverket för skolsocial forskning, 2-3 februari 2017. Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Erfarenheter av skolmisslyckande – forskningsresultat från en psykiatrisk klinik och LVM-hem.
2017 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-61034 (URN)
Conference
Att förebygga skolmisslyckanden- Nätverket för skolsocial forskning, 2-3 februari 2017. Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö.
Available from: 2017-03-01 Created: 2017-03-01 Last updated: 2017-12-28Bibliographically approved
Fälth, L., Gustafson, S. & Svensson, I. (2017). Phonological awareness training with articulation promotes early reading development. Education, 137(3), 261-276
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phonological awareness training with articulation promotes early reading development
2017 (English)In: Education, ISSN 0013-1172, Vol. 137, no 3, p. 261-276Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In a longitudinal intervention study, the effects of phonological trainingwith articulation for children in a preschool class were analyzed.In total, 69 students participated, divided into an experimental groupof 39 and a comparison group of 30 students.The intervention consisted of phonological training with articulationand lasted throughout the preschool class year; in total, 2700 minuteswere spent on this training for the experimental group. All participantswere tested individually on pre-reading skills on four test occasions:before the intervention started, mid-term, immediately after the end ofthe intervention and, finally, a follow-up 6 months after the interventionwas completed.Based on their pre-reading skills, the participants were divided intotwo different subgroups, those at risk of developing reading difficultiesand those not at risk. The results showed greater progress at the follow-up test of both the at-risk and not-at-risk subgroups of the experimentgroup in word decoding and phonological ability than the comparisongroup. The positive results applied both to speech-sounds andwords included in the training program as well as new speech soundsand words not included in the program, thus providing evidence fortransfer effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Project Innovation, Inc., 2017
Keywords
Phonological training, preschool class, articulation, reading development, intervention
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-61397 (URN)
Available from: 2017-03-15 Created: 2017-03-15 Last updated: 2017-12-28Bibliographically approved
Nordström, T. & Svensson, I. (2017). Response to intervention (RTI) och assisterande teknik. Dyslexi – aktuellt om läs- och skrivsvårigheter, 21-27
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Response to intervention (RTI) och assisterande teknik
2017 (Swedish)In: Dyslexi – aktuellt om läs- och skrivsvårigheter, ISSN 1401-2480, , p. 21-27p. 21-27Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Svenska Dyslexiföreningen, 2017. p. 21-27
Keywords
Response to intervention. Assisterande teknik. Läs- och skrivsvårigheter
National Category
Applied Psychology Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences; Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-64498 (URN)
Note

Artikeln syftar till att ge vägledning för hur skolans personal ska kunna göra överväganden kring insatser baserat på vad som kallas assisterande teknik

Available from: 2017-05-30 Created: 2017-05-30 Last updated: 2017-07-25Bibliographically approved
Svensson, I., Lindeblad, E., Nordström, T. & Fälth, L. (2017). Short and long-term effects of using assistive technology for students with reading and writing disabilities in compulory secondary school. In: Language, Literacy and Learning Conference, Perth, Australia, March 30 - April 1, 2017, Perth, Australia: . Paper presented at Language, Literacy and Learning Conference, Perth, Australia, March 30 - April 1, 2017,.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Short and long-term effects of using assistive technology for students with reading and writing disabilities in compulory secondary school
2017 (English)In: Language, Literacy and Learning Conference, Perth, Australia, March 30 - April 1, 2017, Perth, Australia, 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This presentation will discuss a study which investigated whether systematic and intensive use of assistive technology (AT) can improve reading skills and enhance the ability to assimilate and communicate text for students with reading disabilities. Participants of this RCT designed study took part in an intervention which involved daily use of reading and writing apps for tablets over six weeks. We will present data from immediately after the intervention and from the one-year follow-up of reading skills and self-esteem, using assistive technology and a teacher perspective.

Keywords
reading disabilities, assistive technology, assimilate text, communicate text, self-concepts, teacher ratings
National Category
Learning Pedagogy Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-62614 (URN)
Conference
Language, Literacy and Learning Conference, Perth, Australia, March 30 - April 1, 2017,
Available from: 2017-04-26 Created: 2017-04-26 Last updated: 2017-12-28Bibliographically approved
Svensson, I., Fälth, L., Persson, B. A. & Nilsson, S. (2017). The Effect of Reading Interventions among Poor Readers at a Forensic Psychiatric Clinic. Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, 24(3), 440-457
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Effect of Reading Interventions among Poor Readers at a Forensic Psychiatric Clinic
2017 (English)In: Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, ISSN 1321-8719, E-ISSN 1934-1687, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 440-457Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of a short period, 15 sessions, of reading interventions in a sample of adult forensic psychiatric patients: 61 patients with decoding difficulties – 44 in the experimental group and 17 in the comparison group – with an average age of 31.6 participated. Of these, 36% were female, and 29% had an immigrant background. The participants carried out a battery of reading tests. The results in the experimental group showed a medium effect size (d = .36 to .76) on all reading tests between pre- and post-test. The comparison group, however, showed no gain at all between the test occasions. The results indicate that a proportionally low reading intervention effort produces improvement in reading. This study discusses the importance of including reading assessment and offering remediation in order to reach optimal future social adjustment for patients in forensic clinics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
education remediation, forensic patients, interventions, psychiatry, psychology, reading disabilities
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-60079 (URN)10.1080/13218719.2016.1247642 (DOI)000403844400009 ()2-s2.0-85003828509 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-01-23 Created: 2017-01-23 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2608-6204

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