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Johansson, M., Benderix, Y. & Svensson, I. (2020). Mothers' and fathers' lived experiences of postpartum depression and parental stress after childbirth: a qualitative study. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 15(1), 1-10, Article ID 1722564.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mothers' and fathers' lived experiences of postpartum depression and parental stress after childbirth: a qualitative study
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 1-10, article id 1722564Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The study aims are to explore the lived experiences of mothers and fathers of postpartum depression and parental stress after childbirth.

Methods: Qualitative interviews conducted, and analysed from an interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) perspective.

Results: Both mothers and fathers described experiences of inadequacy, although fathers described external requirements, and mothers described internal requirements as the most stressful. Experiences of problems during pregnancy or a traumatic delivery contributed to postpartum depression and anxiety in mothers and affected fathers’ well-being. Thus, identifying postpartum depression with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, mothers described varying experiences of child health care support. Postpartum depression seemed to affect the spouses’ relationships, and both mothers and fathers experienced loneliness and spouse relationship problems. Experiences of emotional problems and troubled upbringing in the parents’ family of origin may contribute to vulnerability from previous trauma and to long-term depressive symptoms for mothers.

Conclusions: The findings of this study demonstrate the significant impact of postpartum depression and parental stress has in parents’ everyday lives and on the spouse relationship. These results support a change from an individual parental focus to couples’ transition to parenthood in child health care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2020
Keywords
Postpartum depression, Parental stress, Child health care, Parental support, Qualitative research
National Category
Other Health Sciences Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-91383 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2020.1722564 (DOI)000509754300001 ()31990637 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-28 Created: 2020-01-28 Last updated: 2020-02-21Bibliographically approved
Sand, C., Nordström, T., Fälth, L. & Svensson, I. (2019). Assimilate and communicate text via assistive technology. An alternative to reading and writing for students with intellectual disability agade 16-21.. In: : . Paper presented at European Dyslexia Association Autumn Seminar, Växjö, Sweden, September 27-29..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assimilate and communicate text via assistive technology. An alternative to reading and writing for students with intellectual disability agade 16-21.
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background: Response-to-intervention (RTI) is a model, used mainly in the USA, with three Tiers of interventions, which get successively gets more intensive, specific and individualized. In this study, the RTI model was adapted to Swedish conditions and an extra Tier was added to introduce assistive technology as a supplement for students who still had difficulties after individualized interventions.

Aim: The purpose of the study was to implement, Response to Intervention (RTI) as a model, in a Swedish Grade 2 class to prevent reading, writing and arithmetic disabilities for children at risk.  However, this poster presentation highlights the reading aspect of the study.

 

Method: The project monitored all students' development in reading, writing and arithmetic with standardized tests. Students that did not develop their reading, writing and arithmetic ability as expected, got more systematic, intensified and individualized training in Tier 2-4. A cut off for success, the 30th  percentile was used.

 

Results:  The effects on non-word reading, word reading and reading comprehension through the different RTI-tiers are presented in the graphs below. The blue curve presents the development of the student who recently came to Sweden and has Swedish as a second language. The red curve presents the student with language impairment

National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-93033 (URN)
Conference
European Dyslexia Association Autumn Seminar, Växjö, Sweden, September 27-29.
Note

Ej belagd 20200325

Available from: 2020-03-20 Created: 2020-03-20 Last updated: 2020-03-25Bibliographically approved
Sand, C., Nordström, T., Fälth, L. & Svensson, I. (2019). Assimilating and communication text via assistive technology: an alternative to reading and writing for ID school pupils aged 16-21. In: : . Paper presented at European Dyslexia Association Autumn Seminars 2019, Växjö, Sweden, September 27-29, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assimilating and communication text via assistive technology: an alternative to reading and writing for ID school pupils aged 16-21
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-90942 (URN)
Conference
European Dyslexia Association Autumn Seminars 2019, Växjö, Sweden, September 27-29, 2019
Available from: 2020-01-15 Created: 2020-01-15 Last updated: 2020-02-14Bibliographically approved
Nordström, T., Nilsson, S., Gustafson, S. & Svensson, I. (2019). Assistive technology applications for students with reading difficulties: special education teacher’s experiences and perceptions. Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 14(8), 798-808
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assistive technology applications for students with reading difficulties: special education teacher’s experiences and perceptions
2019 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 14, no 8, p. 798-808Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Reading and writing applications (with text-to-speech, TTS and speech-to-text, STT functions), used as assistive technology (AT) for students with reading difficulties are increasingly used in education, however, research has not sufficiently enough evaluated its potential. The purpose of this study was to explore how assistive reading and writing applications were perceived to function with regard to students’ possibilities to assimilate (i.e., “read”) and communicate (i.e., “write”) text.

Methods: Following a six-week app intervention, this follow-up survey contained 54 special education teachers’ perceptions of how the use of apps impacted student motivation, learning, and its usability in special education. A total of 59 students with reading difficulties from Grade 4, Grade 8 and from high school, were assessed. Analyses included quantitative and qualitative analyses of teachers’ responses and written material.

Results: The results showed individual differences in how teachers perceived app usage for text-interaction purposes, including how app usage affected student motivation and autonomy for text-based learning. Eighty-two per cent of the younger and forty-seven per cent of older students continued to use the technology after the intervention, but in various degrees.

Conclusions: Based on these findings, students with reading difficulties seem to be able to use AT in order to assimilate text (i.e., to read) and to communicate text (i.e., to write), and, thus, AT has the potential to promote participation in regular education. Future research should focus on how to customize assistive technology support in order to better utilize the potential.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Reading difficulties, assistive technology, intervention, special education
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology; Education, Special Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77935 (URN)10.1080/17483107.2018.1499142 (DOI)000508271700012 ()30239256 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-22 Created: 2018-09-22 Last updated: 2020-02-21Bibliographically approved
Svensson, I., Nordström, T., Lindeblad, E., Gustafson, S., Björn, M., Sand, C., . . . Nilsson, S. (2019). Effects of assistive technology for students with reading and writing disabilities. Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 1-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of assistive technology for students with reading and writing disabilities
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: Assistive technology has been used to mitigate reading disabilities for almost three decades, and tablets with text-to-speech and speech-to-text apps have been introduced in recent years to scaffold reading and writing. Few scientifically rigorous studies, however, have investigated the benefits of this technology.

Purpose: The aim was to explore the effects of assistive technology for students with severe reading disabilities.

Method: This study included 149 participants. The intervention group received 24 sessions of assistive technology training, and the control group received treatment as usual.

Results: Both the intervention and control groups improved as much in 1 year as the normed population did. However, gains did not differ between the groups directly after the intervention or at 1 year of follow-up.

Conclusions: The use of assistive technology seems to have transfer effects on reading ability and to be supportive, especially for students with the most severe difficulties. In addition, it increases motivation for overall schoolwork. Our experience also highlights the obstacles involved in measuring the ability to assimilate and communicate text.

Keywords
Reading and writing disability, assistive technology, apps, interventions
National Category
Applied Psychology Educational Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology; Education, Special Education; Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-89166 (URN)10.1080/17483107.2019.1646821 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-09-17 Created: 2019-09-17 Last updated: 2019-12-06
Bratt, A. S., Svensson, I. & Rusner, M. (2019). Finding confidence and inner trust as a parent: experiences of group-based compassion-focused therapy for the parents of adolescents with mental health problems. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 14(1), 1-9, Article ID 1684166.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Finding confidence and inner trust as a parent: experiences of group-based compassion-focused therapy for the parents of adolescents with mental health problems
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 1-9, article id 1684166Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Compassion-focused therapy (CFT) can alleviate the stress and challenges faced by the parents of adolescents with mental health (MH) problems. Although CFT interventions have shown promising results, few studies have examined its effectiveness in adolescent psychiatric settings. Therefore, this study examined the participant experiences of group-based CFT for the parents of adolescents with MH problems.

Methods: The reflective lifeworld research (RLR) approach was used to conduct in-depth interviews with eleven parents, focusing on participant experiences of group-based CFT. Meaning-oriented data analysis was undertaken.

Results: The essential meaning of the phenomenon of participating in group-based CFT was understood as finding confidence and inner trust as a parent, characterized by an understanding of one’s own needs, which provided parents with the confidence to support their children. The phenomenon is further explicated with its three constituents: (a) taking care of oneself and one’s child; (b) being open and sharing experiences; and (c) acceptance and hope for the future.

Conclusions: The CFT intervention enabled parents to find their agency and strengthened their relationships with their children. The findings underscore the need to acknowledge the supportive role parents play in the recovery of children who receive psychiatric care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Keywords
compassion-focused therapy, parenting, adolescent mental health, qualitative research, lifeworld research, group therapy
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-89851 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2019.1684166 (DOI)000493077300001 ()31662062 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-30 Created: 2019-10-30 Last updated: 2019-11-14Bibliographically approved
Lindeblad, E., Nilsson, S., Gustafson, S. & Svensson, I. (2019). Self-concepts and psychological health in children and adolescents with reading difficulties and the impact of assistive technology to compensate and facilitate reading ability. Cogent Psychology, 6(1), 1-18, Article ID 1647601.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-concepts and psychological health in children and adolescents with reading difficulties and the impact of assistive technology to compensate and facilitate reading ability
2019 (English)In: Cogent Psychology, E-ISSN 2331-1908, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 1-18, article id 1647601Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated self-image, psychological health, and the impact of Assistive Technology (AT) on self-concept and psychological health in 137 children and adolescents with reading difficulties during a systematic intervention program and in a one-year follow-up. Participants were randomly assigned to a control or an intervention group. The interventions aimed to teach participants how to understand texts using AT. The control group received no intervention. To investigate self-esteem, self-image, anxiety, and depression, all participants were assessed with the Cultural Free Self-Esteem Inventory, 3rd edition (CFSEI-3) before intervention and one year post-interventions. Forty-one participants were also assessed on the Beck Youth Inventory (BYI). The AT was found to have no impact on participants' self-esteem. The CFSEI-3 showed similar values for self-esteem in a norm group and the study groups at pre-intervention, which made an increase from using AT less expected. The results are discussed in terms of contextual explanatory factors, such as educators' increased knowledge of reading difficulties and dyslexia. The results on the BYI were somewhat inconclusive since the younger group of participants showed more anxiety than the norm group, but the adolescent group did not. This may be due to small sample size, so further research is recommended.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Keywords
Dyslexia, self-esteem, assistive technology, children, adolescents, self image, special education
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-88838 (URN)10.1080/23311908.2019.1647601 (DOI)000480244000001 ()
Available from: 2019-08-29 Created: 2019-08-29 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Nilvius, C., Fälth, L. & Svensson, I. (2019). The efficiency of Response to Intervention for two struggling readers: A SingleSubject design. In: : . Paper presented at European Dyslexia Association Autumn Seminar, Växjö, Sweden, September 27-29..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The efficiency of Response to Intervention for two struggling readers: A SingleSubject design
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background: Response-to-intervention (RTI) is a model, used mainly in the USA, with three Tiers of interventions, which get successively gets more intensive, specific and individualized. In this study, the RTI model was adapted to Swedish conditions and an extra Tier was added to introduce assistive technology as a supplement for students who still had difficulties after individualized interventions.

Aim: The purpose of the study was to implement, Response to Intervention (RTI) as a model, in a Swedish Grade 2 class to prevent reading, writing and arithmetic disabilities for children at risk.  However, this poster presentation highlights the reading aspect of the study.

 

Method: The project monitored all students' development in reading, writing and arithmetic with standardized tests. Students that did not develop their reading, writing and arithmetic ability as expected, got more systematic, intensified and individualized training in Tier 2-4. A cut off for success, the 30th  percentile was used.

 

Results:  The effects on non-word reading, word reading and reading comprehension through the different RTI-tiers are presented in the graphs below. The blue curve presents the development of the student who recently came to Sweden and has Swedish as a second language. The red curve presents the student with language impairment

National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-90921 (URN)
Conference
European Dyslexia Association Autumn Seminar, Växjö, Sweden, September 27-29.
Note

Ej belagd 20200325

Available from: 2020-01-15 Created: 2020-01-15 Last updated: 2020-03-25Bibliographically approved
Svensson, I., Fälth, L., Tjus, T., Mikael, H. & Stefan, G. (2019). Two-step tier three interventions for children in grade three with low reading fluency. Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, 19(1), 3-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Two-step tier three interventions for children in grade three with low reading fluency
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, ISSN 1471-3802, E-ISSN 1471-3802, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 3-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The main aim of this study was to investigate theeffect of a tier three intervention, response-tointerventiondesign, on children with low readingability in grade three. Twenty-eight children (12females and 16 males) participated in this study.The participants were given out a battery of readingtests including decoding and reading comprehensiontests, and in total, the children received20 reading intervention sessions in two waves, during4 weeks. The results showed substantial gainswith large effect sizes (d 0.78–2.95) on all thereading tests after the intervention period. A short,intensive and individualised intervention has a substantiallypositive effect on children’s reading ability.For a majority of the children, the increasedability sustains even 4 years after the end of theinterventions. However, as boys seem to have thegreatest problem to sustain their increased ability,the authors claim that it is important to continuethe intervention even after the research interventionshave ended.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2019
Keywords
RTI, intervention, reading disabilities, dyslexia, gender differences.
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77520 (URN)10.1111/1471-3802.12419 (DOI)000456573900001 ()2-s2.0-85047627446 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-01 Created: 2018-09-01 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Lindeblad, E., Nilsson, S., Gustafson, S. & Svensson, I. (2017). Assistive technology as reading interventions for children with reading impairments with a one-year follow-up. Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 12(7), 713-724
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assistive technology as reading interventions for children with reading impairments with a one-year follow-up
2017 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 713-724Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: This pilot study investigated the possible transfer effect on reading ability in children with reading difficulties after a systematic intervention to train and compensate for reading deficiencies by using applications in smartphones and tablets. The effects of using assistive technology (AT) one year after the interventions were completely studied. School related motivation, independent learning and family relations were also considered.

METHOD: 35 pupils aged 10-12 years participated. They were assessed five times with reading tests. The participants, their parents and teachers were surveyed with questionnaires regarding their experience of using AT. The data from the assessments were analyzed with paired t-tests and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. The data from the questionnaires were analyzed using content analysis.

RESULTS: The paper shows that using AT can create transfer effects on reading ability one year after the interventions were finished. This means that reading impaired children may develop at the same rate as non-impaired readers. Also, increased school motivation and an increase in independent learning and family effects have been shown.

CONCLUSIONS: This paper provides implications in how to facilitate reading impaired pupils' learning process and realizes the need to challenge the concept of reading to change to fit modern means of gaining information. Implications for rehabilitation Children with reading impairment could benefit from assistive technology in regards of their reading development process and increase their chances of not falling behind peers. Assistive technology as applications in smartphones and tablets may aid children with reading impairment to have an equal platform for learning in school as their peers without reading difficulties. Assistive technology could facilitate the information gaining process and subsequently increase motivation to learn and increase interest in reading activities. Assistive technology had wider effects on its users: stigmatizing situations when leaving the classroom for special education were avoided and positive effects on family life were noted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Assistive technology, Dyslexia, Independent learning, Reading development, Reading impairment, School motivation, Smartphone, Tablets
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-62263 (URN)10.1080/17483107.2016.1253116 (DOI)000418490800007 ()27924656 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85002486047 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-04-12 Created: 2017-04-12 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2608-6204

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