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Negretti, R. & Mežek, Š. (2019). Participatory appropriation as a pathway to self-regulation in academic writing: The case of three BA essay writers in literature. The Journal of Writing Research, 11(1), 1-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Participatory appropriation as a pathway to self-regulation in academic writing: The case of three BA essay writers in literature
2019 (English)In: The Journal of Writing Research, ISSN 2030-1006, E-ISSN 2294-3307, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 1-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Over the years, research on writing has increasingly emphasized the value of adopting a sociocultural perspective to understand how social context and social interaction relate to writing regulation. Using the theoretical lens of participatory appropriation, this study investigates the self regulatory behavior of three successful Bachelor essay writers in literature, and how the interaction with their supervisors supported students' development of writing regulation in disciplinary relevant ways. Data was collected through in-depth qualitative interviews at three key moments in the term; Pintrich's self-regulation framework was used as coding heuristic to trace participants' self-regulation behavior over the term. Self-regulation data was cross-analyzed with data coded as participatory appropriation to identify the overlap between students' self-regulation of writing and their social experiences, especially the dialogue with their supervisors. Our results show how the supervisors acted as agents of socialization, providing frames for adoption of disciplinary-relevant ways of thinking and doing, as well as indirectly sustaining the students' motivation and re conceptualization of the writing experience. Overall, this investigation responds to calls for inquiries of self-regulation against the backdrop of the social context in which it is embedded.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Antwerpen, 2019
Keywords
writing supervision, disciplinary writing, writing regulation, metacognition, motivation
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-85851 (URN)10.17239/jowr-2019.11.01.01 (DOI)000470128700001 ()
Available from: 2019-06-25 Created: 2019-06-25 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Mežek, Š. (2018). Laughter and humour in high-stakes academic ELF interactions: An analysis of laughter episodes in PhD defences/vivas. Journal of English as a Lingua Franca, 7(2), 261-284
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Laughter and humour in high-stakes academic ELF interactions: An analysis of laughter episodes in PhD defences/vivas
2018 (English)In: Journal of English as a Lingua Franca, ISSN 2191-9216, E-ISSN 2191-933X, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 261-284Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates the uses and functions of laughter and humour in a corpus of nine PhD defences/vivas. The data include the PhD defences in their entirety, including monologic and dialogic talk by participants from a variety of research cultures. The defences were video-recorded and transcribed, and laughter episodes analysed according to who laughed, who the source of “the laughable” was, what the reason for laughing was and at what point laughter occurred. The analysis reveals that a majority of laughter was non-humorous, produced by one person, and had the function of mitigating face threats to speakers and others. Humorous laughter was usually produced by more than one person and had the function of relieving tension, creating a non-adversarial atmosphere and building a community. These results are connected to the communicative purposes of the participants; the participants’ mutual aim is to examine an academic work and confirm the candidate’s membership in their chosen specialisation, which requires cooperation from all parties. Furthermore, although the participants come from different research cultures where humour can have a different presence and function, this study shows that laughter and humour are frequent and fill an important function in ELF interactions in high-stakes academic situations.

Abstract [sv]

Denna studie undersöker användning och funktioner för skratt och humor i en korpus av nio disputationer. Materialet omfattar disputationer i sin helhet, inklusive monologiska tal och dialogiska samtal med deltagare från en mängd olika forskningskulturer. Disputationerna filmades och transkriberades, och skrattepisoder analyserades enligt vem som skrattade, vem som var källan till det man skrattade åt, vad skälet till att man skrattade var, samt vid vilken tidpunkt skratt uppstod. Analysen visar att en majoritet av skratten var icke-humoristiska, producerade av endast en person, och hade funktionen att mildra hot mot talarens och andras ansikte. Humoristiskt skratt producerades vanligtvis av mer än en person och hade funktionen att lindra spänningar, skapa en positiv atmosfär och bygga en gemenskap. Dessa resultat är kopplade till deltagarnas kommunikativa syften. Deltagarnas ömsesidiga mål är att undersöka ett akademiskt arbete och godkänna kandidatens medlemskap i sin valda specialisering, vilket kräver samarbete från alla parter. Även om deltagarna kommer från olika forskningskulturer där humor kan ha en annan närvaro och funktion visar den här studien att skratt och humor är frekventa och fyller en viktig funktion i ELF-interaktioner i akademiska situationer med avgörande betydelse.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Walter de Gruyter, 2018
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities, English; Humanities, Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77633 (URN)10.1515/jelf-2018-0014 (DOI)000443293000003 ()
Funder
Åke Wiberg Foundation, H14-0145Gunvor och Josef Anérs stiftelse, FB15-0081
Available from: 2018-09-10 Created: 2018-09-10 Last updated: 2019-01-16Bibliographically approved
Malmström, H., Mežek, Š., Pecorari, D., Shaw, P. & Irvine, A. (2017). Engaging with terminology in the multilingual classroom: Teachers' practices for bridging the gap between L1 lectures and English reading. Classroom Discourse, 8(1), 3-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Engaging with terminology in the multilingual classroom: Teachers' practices for bridging the gap between L1 lectures and English reading
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2017 (English)In: Classroom Discourse, ISSN 1946-3014, E-ISSN 1946-3022, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 3-18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In some academic settings where English is not the first language it is nonetheless common for reading to be assigned in English, and the expectation is often that students will acquire subject terminology incidentally in the first language as well as in English as a result of listening and reading. It is then a prerequisite that students notice and engage with terminology in both languages. To this end, teachers’ classroom practices for making students attend to and engage with terms are crucial for furthering students’ vocabulary competence in two languages. Using transcribed video recordings of eight undergraduate lectures from two universities in such a setting, this paper provides a comprehensive picture of what teachers ‘do’ with terminology during a lecture, i.e. how terms are allowed to feature in the classroom discourse. It is established, for example, that teachers nearly always employ some sort of emphatic practice when using a term in a lecture. However, the repertoire of such practices is limited. Further, teachers rarely adapt their repertoires to cater to the special needs arguably required in these settings, or to exploit the affordances of multilingual environments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2017
Keywords
Disciplinary discourse, vocabulary, exposure, teacher practices, partial English-medium instruction, multilingual classrooms
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-59965 (URN)10.1080/19463014.2016.1224723 (DOI)000396625200002 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2008-5584
Available from: 2017-01-19 Created: 2017-01-19 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved
Mežek, Š. (2017). Humour in high-stakes academic ELF interactions: An analysis of laughter episodes in PhD vivas/defences. In: ELF & Changing English: 10th Anniversary Conference of English as a Lingua Franca. Paper presented at ELF and Changing English: 10th Anniversary Conference of English as a Lingua Franca.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Humour in high-stakes academic ELF interactions: An analysis of laughter episodes in PhD vivas/defences
2017 (English)In: ELF & Changing English: 10th Anniversary Conference of English as a Lingua Franca, 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This study investigates humour in PhD vivas/defences. Laughter episodes in 15h of video recordings were analysed according to who and what makes people laugh, at what point laughter occurs, and what the function of these humorous episodes might be. The study shows that humour is frequent and fills an important function in ELF interactions in high-stakes academic situations.

National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-65629 (URN)
Conference
ELF and Changing English: 10th Anniversary Conference of English as a Lingua Franca
Funder
Åke Wiberg Foundation, H14-0145Gunvor och Josef Anérs stiftelse, FB15-0081
Available from: 2017-06-20 Created: 2017-06-20 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Mežek, Š., McGrath, L. & Berggren, J. (2017). Supporting students' reading strategy use through teacher feedback. In: : . Paper presented at Leda lärande 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Supporting students' reading strategy use through teacher feedback
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-68282 (URN)
Conference
Leda lärande 2017
Note

Ej belagd 180328

Available from: 2017-10-10 Created: 2017-10-10 Last updated: 2018-03-28Bibliographically approved
Larsson, S., Mežek, Š. & Hommerberg, C. (2017). Vocabulary profiles of English language learning textbooks. LMS : Lingua (4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vocabulary profiles of English language learning textbooks
2017 (English)In: LMS : Lingua, ISSN 0023-6330, no 4, p. 6Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Språklärarnas riksförbund, 2017. p. 6
National Category
Specific Languages Educational Sciences
Research subject
Humanities, English Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-73147 (URN)
Available from: 2018-04-21 Created: 2018-04-21 Last updated: 2018-04-24Bibliographically approved
Malmström, H., Mežek, Š., Pecorari, D., Shaw, P. & Irvine, A. (2016). Engaging with terminology in the parallel-language classroom: Teachers' practices for bridging the gap between L1 and English. In: ASLA-symposiet 2016: . Paper presented at ASLA-symposiet 2016, Uppsala University.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Engaging with terminology in the parallel-language classroom: Teachers' practices for bridging the gap between L1 and English
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2016 (English)In: ASLA-symposiet 2016, 2016Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In settings in which English is used as a medium of instruction (EMI) in parallel with another language, a common expectation is that students will acquire subject terminology incidentally in the L1 as well as in English as a result of listening and reading. It is then a prerequisite that students notice and engage with terminology in both languages. To this end, teachers’ classroom practices for making students attend to and engage with terms are crucial for furthering students’ vocabulary competence in two languages. Using transcribed video recordings of a sample of lectures from two courses in a partial EMI setting, in which the lectures were in Swedish and the textbooks were in English, this paper will present a comprehensive picture of what teachers ‘do’ with terminology during a lecture, i.e., how terms are allowed to feature in the classroom discourse. It is established, for example, that teachers nearly always employ some sort of emphatic practice when using a term in a lecture. However, the repertoire of such practices is limited. Further, teachers rarely adapt their repertoires to cater to the special needs arguably required in partial EMI settings, or to exploit the affordances of these learning environments.

National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-59969 (URN)
Conference
ASLA-symposiet 2016, Uppsala University
Available from: 2017-01-19 Created: 2017-01-19 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Negretti, R. & Mežek, Š. (2016). Participatory appropriation as a pathway to self-regulation in academic writing: The case of three BA essay writers in literature. In: SIG Writing International Conference and Research School 2016: . Paper presented at SIG Writing International Conference and Research School, 1st – 6th July 2016. , Article ID 826.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Participatory appropriation as a pathway to self-regulation in academic writing: The case of three BA essay writers in literature
2016 (English)In: SIG Writing International Conference and Research School 2016, 2016, article id 826Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Apprenticeship in academic prose is a transformative experience (Hayot, 2014); this paper investigates the development of self-regulation (SR) in three bachelor (BA) literature essay writers using the theoretical lens of participatory appropriation by Rogoff (1990), explaining how individuals’ cognitive development stems from social interaction. Research on writing instruction shows that students who learn to self-regulate towards concrete goals achieve better text quality (Rogers & Graham, 2008; Graham & Perin, 2007). Furthermore, research with learners of academic writing suggests that metacognitive skills are integral to the development of genre knowledge and rhetorical effectiveness (author). In this study, we investigate how interaction with a supervisor supports students’ development of self-regulatory and metacognitive skills towards alignment with the stakeholders’ (the examiners) evaluation of the quality of writing. Data was collected through in-depth qualitative interviews at three points in the term; interview data was also collected from the examiners. Data was analyzed in NVivo, using Pintrich’s (2000) SR framework to code the comments by the students. The coded data shows their individual development in SR over the course of the essay writing term. Results show a strong role of the interaction with their supervisor in planning and monitoring their writing. Participatory appropriation thus seemed to help the students plan towards genre-relevant aspects such as what the essay should aim for (genre goals) and what would be the expectations to meet (genre criteria), or monitor some key aspects of essay writing that they would otherwise have not paid attention to. Overall, this investigation responds to calls for context-sensitive inquiries of self-regulation and metacognition, where individual development is highlighted against the backdrop of the social context in which it is embedded (Pieschl, 2009).

National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-59968 (URN)
Conference
SIG Writing International Conference and Research School, 1st – 6th July 2016
Available from: 2017-01-19 Created: 2017-01-19 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Mežek, Š. & Swales, J. M. (2016). PhD defences and vivas. In: Ken Hyland, Philip Shaw (Ed.), The Routledge Handbook of English for Academic Purposes: (pp. 361-375). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>PhD defences and vivas
2016 (English)In: The Routledge Handbook of English for Academic Purposes / [ed] Ken Hyland, Philip Shaw, London: Routledge, 2016, p. 361-375Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2016
Series
Routledge Handbooks in Applied Linguistics
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-59967 (URN)9781138774711 (ISBN)9781315657455 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-01-19 Created: 2017-01-19 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
McGrath, L., Berggren, J. & Mežek, Š. (2016). Reading EAP: Investigating high proficiency L2 university students' strategy use through reading blogs. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 22, 152-164
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reading EAP: Investigating high proficiency L2 university students' strategy use through reading blogs
2016 (English)In: Journal of English for Academic Purposes, ISSN 1475-1585, E-ISSN 1878-1497, Vol. 22, p. 152-164Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates the reading strategies used by academically novice, but high proficiency L2 students of English enrolled in a teacher education programme at a major Swedish university. Data were obtained from personal reading blogs kept by the students as they undertook course reading at home. An analysis revealed that students employed various reading strategies; however, there was limited evidence to suggest that students employed these strategies routinely. The most common strategy reported was connecting to short-term writing task. While students reported reflecting on their reading, they did not appear to amend unsuccessful strategy use, or re-use successful strategies. The study reveals the difficulties and limitations of high proficiency L2 students who lack experience of reading academic literature in English, and discusses pedagogical implications for reading blogs.

Keywords
Academic reading, Blogs, High proficiency L2, Novice academic readers, Reading strategies
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-59966 (URN)10.1016/j.jeap.2016.03.003 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-01-19 Created: 2017-01-19 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8995-4366

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