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Rennemark, Mikael
Publications (10 of 26) Show all publications
Bratt, A. S., Stenström, U. & Rennemark, M. (2018). Exploring the Most Important Negative Life Events in Older Adults Bereaved of Child, Spouse, or Both. Omega, 76(3), 227-236
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the Most Important Negative Life Events in Older Adults Bereaved of Child, Spouse, or Both
2018 (English)In: Omega, ISSN 0030-2228, E-ISSN 1541-3764, Vol. 76, no 3, p. 227-236Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Losing a child or a spouse is described as the worst of experiences. However, it is not known whether older adults bereaved of a child, spouse, or both child and spouse experience these losses as among the most important negative events in their life- time. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the 1,437 older adults bereaved of a child, spouse, or both included in the southern part of the Swedish National Study of Aging and Care mentioned these losses when asked about their three most important negative life events. Gender differences in their choices of important negative life events were also explored. About 70% of those bereaved of a child or a spouse mentioned these losses as among their three most important negative life experiences. In the child-and-spouse-bereaved group, 48% mentioned both the loss of their child and spouse, while 40% mentioned either the loss of a child or a spouse. Gender differences were only found in the child-and-spouse-bereaved group, with a few more women mentioning the loss of the child but not the spouse, and the men showing the opposite pattern. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
negative life events, child and spouse loss, bereavement, older adults
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-52677 (URN)10.1177/0030222816642453 (DOI)000418863000002 ()
Available from: 2016-05-26 Created: 2016-05-26 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Bratt, A. S., Stenström, U. & Rennemark, M. (2017). Effects on life satisfaction of older adults after child and spouse bereavement. Aging & Mental Health, 21(6), 602-608
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects on life satisfaction of older adults after child and spouse bereavement
2017 (English)In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 602-608Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Few studies have compared the impact of different familial losses on life satisfaction (LS). Furthermore, there is a lack of research on the effect of having lost both a child and a spouse among older adults. Sample: A random sample of 1402 individuals, 817 women and 585 men, aged 60–96 years from the Blekinge part of the Swedish National Study of Aging and Care (SNAC-B) participated in this cross-sectional study. Aims: The first aim was to compare the effects of child or spouse or both child and spouse bereavement on LS and, the second aim, to investigate if there were gender differences within the bereaved groups. Results: The results showed that having lost a child, spouse or both child and spouse had a negative association with LS, although this effect was small. Having experienced multiple losses did not predict more variance than a single child or spouse loss. Gender differences were found within all the bereaved groups with bereaved men having lower LS than bereaved women. Longer time since the loss was associated with higher LS. Conclusions: Bereaved older adults have somewhat lower LS than non-bereaved and bereaved men seem more affected than bereaved women. Future research needs to address older men´s experiences after the loss of a loved one.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2017
Keywords
Child and spouse bereavement, life satisfaction, older age
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-51482 (URN)10.1080/13607863.2015.1135874 (DOI)000400171200004 ()26768164 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-28 Created: 2016-03-28 Last updated: 2017-05-24Bibliographically approved
Berner, J., Anderberg, P., Rennemark, M. & Berglund, J. (2016). Case management for frail older adults through tablet computers and skype. Informatics for Health and Social Care, 41(4), 405-416
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Case management for frail older adults through tablet computers and skype
2016 (English)In: Informatics for Health and Social Care, ISSN 1753-8157, E-ISSN 1753-8165, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 405-416Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Frail older adults are high consumers of medical care due to their age and multiple chronic conditions. Regular contact with a case manager has been proven to increase well-being of frail older adults and reduce their number of health-care visits. Skype calls through tablet PCs can offer easier communication. Objective: This paper examines frail older adults’ use of tablet computers and Skype, with their case managers.Method: Interviews were conducted on 15 frail older adults. A content analysis was used to structure and analyze the data. Results: The results indicate that tablet computers were experienced in a positive way for most frail older adults. Conflicting feelings did emerge, however, as to whether the frail elderly would adopt this in the long run. Skype needs to be tested further as to whether this is a good solution for communication with their case managers. Strong technical support and well-functioning technology are important elements to facilitate use. Conclusion: Using Skype and tablet PCs do have potential for frail older adults, but need to be tested further.

National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-43246 (URN)10.3109/17538157.2015.1033528 (DOI)000378307400006 ()26691495 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84951276661 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-05-17 Created: 2015-05-17 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Sandin Wranker, L., Rennemark, M. & Berglund, J. (2016). Pain among older adults from a gender perspective: Findings from teh Swedish National study on Aging and Care. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 44(3), 258-263
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pain among older adults from a gender perspective: Findings from teh Swedish National study on Aging and Care
2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 258-263Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Pain is common in the elderly population and its prevalence varies according to the studied disease, clinical setting, sex and age. This study examines pain in an aging population from a gender perspective.

METHODS: The Swedish National study on Aging and Care (SNAC) is conducted at four research centres. Participants were recruited from the baseline sample (n=1402) at one of the research centres, SNAC-Blekinge. Individuals aged 60 years and older were included and non-participation was documented. Research personnel conducted the medical examination on two occasions.

RESULTS: The prevalence of pain was 769/1402 (54.8%), distributed as 496/817 (64.5%) women and 273/585 (35.5%) men, p<0.01. Women reported more pain located in the vertebral column, p<0.01. The most common pain location was the legs and feet. About 84% reported pain intensity as 4 or higher on the visual analogue scale (VAS). Pain intensity declines with age among men, p<0.01. The most frequent treatment was painkillers. A total of 128/263 (48.7%) of the men received no pain treatment compared with 177/478 (37.0%) of the women, p<0.01. In a multivariate logistic regression model, women yielded the highest OR [OR 1.94 (C.I. 1.51-2.49)] for pain.

CONCLUSIONS: Pain is common among older adults and there are significant differences between the sexes. Almost 55% of participants reported pain, predominantly women. In the majority of cases the intensity was rated as moderate or severe (VAS >4) and women rated higher than men p<0.02. Almost half of the men (48.7%) did not receive any treatment compared to 37% of the women, p<0.01.

Keywords
Pain, prevalence, treatment, older adults
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-48470 (URN)10.1177/1403494815618842 (DOI)000373591600006 ()26647094 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84962625838 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-12-19 Created: 2015-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Rennemark, M. (2016). Predictors of survival in the Swedish 60 to 96 years old population. European Journal of Public Health, 26(Suppl 1), Article ID ckw166.004.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictors of survival in the Swedish 60 to 96 years old population
2016 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 26, no Suppl 1, article id ckw166.004Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Longevity is multi-determined. In this study, biological, social and psychological factors were included in a multivariate model in order to investigate their predictive ability of survival in a nine year follow up period.

Methods

The sample was drawn from the Swedish National study on Aging and Care (SNAC), including a representative database of Swedish inhabitants aged 60 to 96 years. The participants (N = 6986) were followed during the years 2002 to 2011. Data was collected including age, physical activity, body mass index (BMI), muscle strength, living alone or not, household economy, functional status, smoking habits and education. These variables were used as predictors in multiple logistic regression analyses in order to estimate the odds ratios of survival during the follow up period.

Results

During the nine year period, 4447 participants (64%) survived. Education was the strongest predictor of survival with 57% higher odds to survive for higher educated participants (P<.001. 95%CI = 1.38 – 1.78), followed by not living alone, which increased the odds of survival with 37% (P<.001. 95%CI = .65 - .83). Light physical activity increased the odds of survival with 18% (P<.001. 95%CI = 1.12 – 1.24) and not smoking was significant related to survival but the odds ratio was as low as 10% (P<.01. 95%CI = 1.03 – 1.71).

Conclusions

Social aspects such as education and not living alone are strong predictors of survival in older populations and must be considered in the understanding of differences in longevity. In addition, life habits such as physical activity and smoking behaviors should be taken into account.

Key message:

  • Both social and behavioral factors contribute to the understanding of differences in longevity in the Swedish population of 60 to 96 years old people in Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2016
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-64259 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/ckw166.004 (DOI)000398600401025 ()
Available from: 2017-05-23 Created: 2017-05-23 Last updated: 2018-02-16Bibliographically approved
Bratt, A. S., Stenström, U. & Rennemark, M. (2016). The Role of Neuroticism and Conscientiousness on Mortality Risk in Older Adults After Child and Spouse Bereavement. Aging & Mental Health, 20(6), 559-566
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of Neuroticism and Conscientiousness on Mortality Risk in Older Adults After Child and Spouse Bereavement
2016 (English)In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 559-566Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Bereavement effects on mortality risk were investigated in 1150 randomly selected participants, aged 60-104, in the Swedish National Study of Aging and Care.

Method: Cox proportional hazards models, controlling for age, gender, functional ability, the personality traits neuroticism and conscientiousness as well as time since the latest loss were used to predict mortality risk.

Results: Having lost a child, spouse or both child and spouse did not predict mortality risk. An indirect link between bereavement and mortality was found showing for each year since loss the mortality risk decreased by about 1%. Neuroticism, but not conscientiousness, was associated with mortality risk, with a small-effect size.

Conclusions: The different bereavements did not predict mortality risk while an indirect link was found showing that mortality risk decreased with time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2016
Keywords
loss/bereavement/life events, mortality risk, personality
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-42899 (URN)10.1080/13607863.2015.1031638 (DOI)000372119100001 ()25856539 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84961212316 (Scopus ID)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2015-04-28 Created: 2015-04-28 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Berner, J., Rennemark, M., Jogreus, C., Anderberg, P., Sköldunger, A., Wahlberg, M., . . . Berglund, J. (2015). Factors influenceing internet usage in older adults (65 years and above) living in rural and urban Sweden. Health Informatics Journal, 21(3), 237-249
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors influenceing internet usage in older adults (65 years and above) living in rural and urban Sweden
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 237-249Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Older adults living in rural and urban areas have shown to distinguish themselves in technology adoption;a clearer profile of their Internet use is important in order to provide better technological and health-caresolutions. Older adults’ Internet use was investigated across large to midsize cities and rural Sweden. Thesample consisted of 7181 older adults ranging from 59 to 100 years old. Internet use was investigated withage, education, gender, household economy, cognition, living alone/or with someone and rural/urban living.Logistic regression was used. Those living in rural areas used the Internet less than their urban counterparts.Being younger and higher educated influenced Internet use; for older urban adults, these factors as well asliving with someone and having good cognitive functioning were influential. Solutions are needed to avoid theexclusion of some older adults by a society that is today being shaped by the Internet.

National Category
Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-30707 (URN)10.1177/1460458214521226 (DOI)000360409700005 ()24567416 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84940547133 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-11-25 Created: 2013-11-25 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Dahl, M., Allwood, C. M., Scimone, B. & Rennemark, M. (2015). Old and very old adults as witnesses: Event memory and metamemory. Psychology, Crime and Law, 21(8), 764-775
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Old and very old adults as witnesses: Event memory and metamemory
2015 (English)In: Psychology, Crime and Law, ISSN 1068-316X, E-ISSN 1477-2744, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 764-775Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Older people constitute an important category of eyewitnesses. Episodic memory performance in older persons is poorer than in younger adults, but little research has been made on older persons' metacognitive judgments. Since more persons of advanced age will likely be called upon as witnesses in coming years, it is critical to characterize this population's metacognitive abilities. We compared event memory metacognition in old adults (66-year-old, n = 74) to very old adults (87 or 90 years old, n = 55). Participants were tested on their memory of a film, using questions with two answer alternatives and the confidence in their answer. As expected, the very old group had a lower accuracy rate than the old group (d = 0.59). The very old group, however, monitored this impairment, since their over-/underconfidence and calibration did not differ from the old group but they displayed a poorer ability to separate correct from incorrect answers (discrimination ability). Possibly, the very old group was able to monitor the level of their over-/underconfidence because they applied general self-knowledge about their memory skills. In contrast, the discrimination of correct from incorrect answers may be more dependent on ability to attend to the features of each retrieved memory.

National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-43244 (URN)10.1080/1068316X.2015.1038266 (DOI)000361611100004 ()2-s2.0-84942198806 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-05-17 Created: 2015-05-17 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Sandin Wranker, L., Rennemark, M., Elmsthål, S. & Berglund, J. (2015). The influence of personality traits on perception of pain in older adults: Findings from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care – Blekinge study. Scandinavian Journal of Pain, 7, 3-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The influence of personality traits on perception of pain in older adults: Findings from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care – Blekinge study
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, ISSN 1877-8860, E-ISSN 1877-8879, Vol. 7, p. 3-8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and aims

The experience of pain may vary in accordance with personality traits and individual characteristics. Neuroticism is demonstrated to constitute a vulnerability factor among younger and middle-aged pain patients. The combination of openness and neuroticism is associated with high anxiety/depression scores among adult individuals with chronic conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate possible associations between pain and the personality dimensions of neuroticism, extroversion, openness, agreeableness and conscientiousness among persons aged 60 years and older. An additional aim was to explore whether such associations are equally gender expressed.

Methods

The Swedish National Study on Aging and Care includes a randomly selected sample from the National Population Register. The data collection was conducted at four research centres and was approved by the Ethics Committees of Lund University and the Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. The Blekinge sample includes 1402 individuals, aged 60–96 years, of whom 769 (55%) reported pain. A total of 2312 individuals had been invited to participate. The reason for non-participation was registered. Participants underwent medical examination and testing by research personnel, conducted in two sessions, each of which lasted about 3 h. A questionnaire was completed between the two sessions. Pain was self-reported and based on the question: Have you had ache/pain during the last 4 weeks? Information on personality traits was obtained by means of the personality SGC1 questionnaire; a 60-item Swedish version of Costa & McCrae's FFM questionnaire. Personality traits were then tested based on gender by means of multivariate forward logistic regression in models adjusted for age, insomnia, financial status and educational level.

Results

When adjusting for covariates among women, neuroticism had a small but significant odds ratio of experiencing pain (OR 1.05, CI 1.02–1.08). Insomnia had the highest odds ratio (OR 2.19, CI 1.52–3.15) followed by low education (OR 1.59, CI 1.07–2.36), while belonging to the younger part of the older adult cohort was also associated with pain (OR 1.02, CI 1.005–1.04). In men, neuroticism (OR 1.03, CI 1.002–1.06) followed by openness (OR 1.03 CI 1.001–1.07) had a small but significant odds ratio of experiencing pain. Insomnia had the highest odds ratio (OR 1.98, CI 1.24–3.15).

Conclusions

Personality traits and pain were related among the older adults but there were gender differences. The relationship between pain and neuroticism in women was about the same in strength as the relation between pain and neuroticism/openness in men. Both sexes suffer from insomnia. The relationship between personality traits and pain was only affected to a minor extent by insomnia.

Implications

There is a need to increase awareness of the impact of personality as well as to provide improved treatment for pain and insomnia in older people.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Pain, Personality traits, Gender, Older adults
National Category
Psychology Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences; Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-30706 (URN)10.1016/j.sjpain.2014.12.002 (DOI)000217937200002 ()2-s2.0-84961325004 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-11-25 Created: 2013-11-25 Last updated: 2018-04-18Bibliographically approved
Rennemark, M. & Berglund, J. (2014). Decreased cognitive functions at the age of 66, as measured by the MMSE, associated with having left working life before the age of 60: results from the SNAC study. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 42(3), 304-309
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decreased cognitive functions at the age of 66, as measured by the MMSE, associated with having left working life before the age of 60: results from the SNAC study
2014 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 304-309Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: The age of retirement has financial implications as we tend to live longer, with the result that an increasing number of older inhabitants have to share limited financial resources. However, this is not only a financial issue. It is also of interest to investigate factors related to health and quality of life associated with the age of retirement. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in mood, activity level, and cognition at the age of 66 associated with leaving working life before 60. Methods: Baseline and follow-up data on 840 participants of the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care – Blekinge was used. Mood was measured by the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Scale and activity level by 27 survey items. Cognition was measured by the Mini Mental State Examination. Results: Retirement before 60 years of age was not associated with lower cognitive functions and a higher score on depression at baseline, but retirees were less active. Six years later, at the age of 66, a decline in their cognition was found. Retirees were still not more depressed but less active. In a logistic regression analysis, being retired increased the odds ratio for cognitive decline by 1.36-times (OR 2.36) when gender, activity level, education level, and depression were adjusted for. Conclusions: Participants who retired before the age of 60 declined in cognitive ability over the 6-year study period.

National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-32530 (URN)10.1177/1403494813520357 (DOI)000336795100012 ()2-s2.0-84899457232 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-02-27 Created: 2014-02-27 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
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