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Gössling, S., Zeiss, H., Hall, C. M., Martin-Rios, C., Ram, Y. & Grøtte, I.-P. (2019). A cross-country comparison of accommodation manager perspectives on online review manipulation. Current Issues in Tourism, 1-20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A cross-country comparison of accommodation manager perspectives on online review manipulation
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2019 (English)In: Current Issues in Tourism, ISSN 1368-3500, E-ISSN 1747-7603, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Accommodation businesses are increasingly dependent on a limited number of reservation platforms. A significant feature of these platforms is guest evaluations, which are transformed into ratings and rankings. As the positioning of the business in comparison to competitors determines customer demand, accommodation managers have considerable interest in maintaining or improving their online reputation. One response may be to engage in manipulation strategies. This paper presents the results of a survey including 270 hotel managers in five countries, Germany, Israel, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland. Managers confirm growing competition as a result of ratings and rankings, and they report that guests are increasingly aware of the importance of reviews. To avert negative online feedback impacts, managers intervene strategically. The paper discusses new market pressures, emergent consumer judgement culture and consumer citizenship, opportunities for legal redress and the emerging importance of reputation management strategies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Consumer citizenship, hotels, manipulation, online reviews, rankings, ratings
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72449 (URN)10.1080/13683500.2018.1455171 (DOI)2-s2.0-85044251436 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-09 Created: 2018-04-09 Last updated: 2019-03-14
Seyfi, S. & Hall, C. M. (2019). International sanctions, tourism destinations and resistive economy. Journal of Policy Research in Tourism, Leisure and Events, 11(1), 159-169
Open this publication in new window or tab >>International sanctions, tourism destinations and resistive economy
2019 (English)In: Journal of Policy Research in Tourism, Leisure and Events, ISSN 1940-7963, E-ISSN 1940-7971, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 159-169Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-79472 (URN)10.1080/19407963.2018.1482305 (DOI)000454075000008 ()
Available from: 2019-01-17 Created: 2019-01-17 Last updated: 2019-01-22Bibliographically approved
Kemper, J. A., Hall, C. M. & Ballantine, P. W. (2019). Marketing and Sustainability: Business as Usual or Changing Worldviews?. Sustainability, 11(3), Article ID 780.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Marketing and Sustainability: Business as Usual or Changing Worldviews?
2019 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 3, article id 780Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Marketing, and the business schools within which most marketing academics and researchers work, have a fraught relationship with sustainability. Marketing is typically regarded as encouraging overconsumption and contributing to global change yet, simultaneously, it is also promoted as a means to enable sustainable consumption. Based on a critical review of the literature, the paper responds to the need to better understand the underpinnings of marketing worldviews with respect to sustainability. The paper discusses the concept of worldviews and their transformation, sustainability's articulation in marketing and business schools, and the implications of the market logic dominance in faculty mind-sets. This is timely given that business schools are increasingly positioning themselves as a positive contributor to sustainability. Institutional barriers, specifically within universities, business schools, and the marketing discipline, are identified as affecting the ability to effect bottom-up' change. It is concluded that if institutions, including disciplines and business schools, remain wedded to assumptions regarding the compatibility between the environment and economic growth and acceptance of market forces then the development of alternative perspectives on sustainability remains highly problematic.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
green marketing, sustainable marketing, sustainable development, sustainability, institutional change, paradigm change, worldview
National Category
Environmental Sciences Economics and Business
Research subject
Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81096 (URN)10.3390/su11030780 (DOI)000458929500225 ()
Available from: 2019-03-15 Created: 2019-03-15 Last updated: 2019-03-15Bibliographically approved
Gössling, S. & Hall, C. M. (2019). Sharing versus collaborative economy: how to align ICT developments and the SDGs in tourism?. Journal of Sustainable Tourism, 27(1), 74-96
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sharing versus collaborative economy: how to align ICT developments and the SDGs in tourism?
2019 (English)In: Journal of Sustainable Tourism, ISSN 0966-9582, E-ISSN 1747-7646, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 74-96Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Great hopes have been placed in the sharing economy to provide a new business model based on peer-to-peer (P2P) exchanges of underutilized assets. As a model, the sharing economy has been expected to make significant contributions to sustainability, providing new opportunities for entrepreneurship, more sustainable use of resources, and consumer co-operation in tight economic networks. However, in recent years, digital platforms have turned into the most important actors in the global sharing economy, turning global corporations, such as AirBnB, Booking, or TripAdvisor into intermediaries controlling and profiting from most transactions. Focused on accommodation, this paper conceptualizes the sharing economy in comparison to the wider collaborative economy, and discusses its social, economic, environmental, and political impacts in comparison to the sustainable development goals. It concludes that the sharing economy has great potential to make very significant contributions to sustainability, though the model is increasingly being replaced by the collaborative economy, which performs as an extension and acceleration of neoliberal economic practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Channel View Publications, 2019
Keywords
Collaborative economy, information and communication technologies, sharing economy, sustainability, sustainable development goals
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81100 (URN)10.1080/09669582.2018.1560455 (DOI)000459620400005 ()
Available from: 2019-03-15 Created: 2019-03-15 Last updated: 2019-03-15Bibliographically approved
Amore, A., Prayag, G. & Hall, C. M. (2018). Conceptualizing Destination Resilience from a Multilevel Perspective. Tourism Review International, 22(3-4), 235-250
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conceptualizing Destination Resilience from a Multilevel Perspective
2018 (English)In: Tourism Review International, ISSN 1544-2721, E-ISSN 1943-4421, Vol. 22, no 3-4, p. 235-250Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The concept of resilience has gained momentum in current tourism research, yet there are still flaws and discrepancies between the many notions applied in the field. These limitations arc further evident when we focus on tourist destinations. The aim of this article is to advance the conceptualization of destination resilience through a multilevel perspective (MLP) that frames landscape, regime, niche, and actors as integrated elements of the tourism system. The resulting framework encompasses ecological, socioecological, sociopolitical, socioeconomic, and sociotechnological dimensions reflecting the embeddedness of resilience among heterogeneous and potentially complementary destination stakeholders. It is argued that the use of the MLP advances the understanding of tourism destination planning, particularly in contexts coping with gradual as well as drastic changes due to both demand fluctuations and supply-side disturbances.

Keywords
Resilience, Tourism, Destination resilience, Multilevel perspective, Regime
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-80959 (URN)10.3727/154427218X15369305779010 (DOI)000458584600007 ()
Available from: 2019-03-05 Created: 2019-03-05 Last updated: 2019-03-05Bibliographically approved
Baird, T., Hall, C. M. & Castka, P. (2018). New Zealand Winegrowers Attitudes and Behaviours towards Wine Tourism and Sustainable Winegrowing. Sustainability, 10(3), Article ID 797.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New Zealand Winegrowers Attitudes and Behaviours towards Wine Tourism and Sustainable Winegrowing
2018 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 3, article id 797Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There are significant economic, environmental, social, and marketing issues that exist from the supply-side perspective in response to sustainability. This study examines New Zealand winegrowers in terms of their attitudes and behaviours towards wine tourism and sustainable wine production. A national survey was conducted at the end of 2015, which was the fourth such survey to be undertaken as part of a longitudinal study of wine tourism in New Zealand. This survey drew on issues of wine and biosecurity, climate change, and eco-labelling, as well as wine tourism. These issues were examined within the context of three key drivers of sustainability: the physical aspects of sustainable wine production, the internal drivers within wine businesses for the adoption of sustainable practices, and the external regulatory aspects that govern the adoption of sustainable wine production practices. The findings indicate that there were substantial concerns with the perceived value provided by both wine tourism and sustainable winegrowing practices. These concerns exist at both the firm level and with the governing bodies that are responsible for implementing sustainable winegrowing initiatives. Unless this perception of the value of sustainability within the New Zealand wine industry is altered in the future, it appears that there will continue to be an ongoing issue as to how sustainable winegrowing initiatives are implemented.

Keywords
wine tourism, sustainable winegrowing, rural development, regional development, biosecurity, branding, partial-industrialisation, innovation, climate change
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-76486 (URN)10.3390/su10030797 (DOI)000428567100224 ()
Available from: 2018-07-10 Created: 2018-07-10 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Darbi, W. P., Hall, C. M. & Knott, P. (2018). The Informal Sector: A Review and Agenda for Management Research. International journal of management reviews (Print), 20(2), 301-324
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Informal Sector: A Review and Agenda for Management Research
2018 (English)In: International journal of management reviews (Print), ISSN 1460-8545, E-ISSN 1468-2370, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 301-324Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite its connotations of non-compliance, illegality, social exploitation and marginality, the informal sector is a substantial contributor to economic life in developing countries and, increasingly, in more technologically advanced activities. Its prevalence in developed economies has also become more widely recognized. In light of its significance, this paper reviews research on the informal sector from a management and organization scholarship perspective, rather than from an entrepreneurship view, as has been the focus until now. It sets out the atypical management practices that are inherent in the sector, explores the under-researched relationship between formal and informal firms, and highlights definitional, conceptual and other limitations in extant research. As a step in resolving these issues, the authors present a conceptual model of formality and informality in a three-dimensional framework that highlights an organizational infrastructure dimension, a view of firms operating along a continuum, and a multi-level analytical context. Building on this, the authors detail opportunities for enhanced appreciation of in situ management and organizational practices in the informal sector and outline tools for pursuing a management and organization scholarship agenda. Overall, the authors argue that management scholarship has great potential to improve understanding of the informal sector, and that the informal sector provides opportunities to advance management theory, research and practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-76483 (URN)10.1111/ijmr.12131 (DOI)000429712700006 ()
Available from: 2018-07-10 Created: 2018-07-10 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Gössling, S., Hall, C. M. & Andersson, A.-C. (2018). The manager's dilemma: a conceptualization of online review manipulation strategies. Current Issues in Tourism, 21(5), 484-503
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The manager's dilemma: a conceptualization of online review manipulation strategies
2018 (English)In: Current Issues in Tourism, ISSN 1368-3500, E-ISSN 1747-7603, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 484-503Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Online evaluations are one of the most important innovations in tourism in recent years, often combining a review/rating (business-specific evaluation) and a ranking (inter-business comparison). As online reputation determines economic success, tourism managers may be tempted to manipulate online content. This paper presents the results from a qualitative study involving 20 hotel managers in southern Sweden, and their perspectives on manipulation. Results confirm that there exists a wide range of review manipulation strategies, many of which are difficult to control. Even though only few managers appear to systematically manipulate, online evaluations represent a significant challenge for businesses, as they introduce direct competition and foster consumer judgement cultures. It is postulated that managers will increasingly find themselves in a Prisoner's dilemma, representing a situation where engaging in manipulation is the most rational choice in an increasingly competitive market situation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Economy, Business administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-48762 (URN)10.1080/13683500.2015.1127337 (DOI)000423747800002 ()
Available from: 2016-01-13 Created: 2016-01-13 Last updated: 2018-02-15Bibliographically approved
Hall, C. M. & Ram, Y. (2018). Walk score (R) and its potential contribution to the study of active transport and walkability: A critical and systematic review. Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, 61, 310-324
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Walk score (R) and its potential contribution to the study of active transport and walkability: A critical and systematic review
2018 (English)In: Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, ISSN 1361-9209, E-ISSN 1879-2340, Vol. 61, p. 310-324Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Walk Score (R) index has become increasingly applied in studies of walking and walkability. The index assesses the "walking potential" of a place through a combination of three elements: the shortest distance to a group of preselected destinations, the block length, and the intersection density around the origin. The Index links a gravity-based measure (distance accessibility), with topological accessibility (street connectivity) measured by two complementary indicators that act as penalties in the final score (R) (linearly expanded in the range 0-100). A systematic review of Scopus (R) and Web of Science was conducted with 42 journal articles eventually being evaluated. Research was primarily undertaken in North American urban geographies. Analysis of walk ability using Walk Score (R) is inconsistent. Twenty-nine papers do not exclusively relying on Walk Score (R) as a single measurement of walkability and add further estimates to better capture the multiple dimensions of walkability. In 33 studies the Walk Score (R) was used as an independent variable, and only once as a mediating-moderating variable. In eight papers (18%) the Walk Score (R) was a part of a bivariate correlation model. On no occasion was it used as a dependent variable. Results tend to only partly support the validity of Walk Score (R). The paper concludes that the Index is best understood as a surrogate measure of the density of the built environment of a specific neighborhood that indicates utilitarian walking potential. Implications for, and potential areas of, future research are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Active transport, Built environment, Leisure walking, Utilitarian walking, Walk Score (R), Walkability
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77011 (URN)10.1016/j.trd.2017.12.018 (DOI)000438003400008 ()
Available from: 2018-07-27 Created: 2018-07-27 Last updated: 2018-07-27Bibliographically approved
Adie, B. A., Hall, C. M. & Prayag, G. (2018). World Heritage as a placebo brand: a comparative analysis of three sites and marketing implications. Journal of Sustainable Tourism, 26(3), 399-415
Open this publication in new window or tab >>World Heritage as a placebo brand: a comparative analysis of three sites and marketing implications
2018 (English)In: Journal of Sustainable Tourism, ISSN 0966-9582, E-ISSN 1747-7646, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 399-415Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The UNESCO World Heritage (WH) List is often regarded as a successful tourism brand that motivates site nominations. However, there is relatively little research dealing specifically with WH brand attraction effects, and what does exist shows conflicting results. There is a significant research gap in terms of awareness of the WH brand and its potential impact on visitation, which this study seeks to fill through a comparative analysis of three diverse case studies: Independence Hall, USA; Studenica Monastery, Serbia; and the Archaeological Site of Volubilis, Morocco. Survey data (n = 771) from these three sites were collected and analyzed resulting in three distinct clusters of visitors. One of the clusters does exhibit higher levels of awareness of the WH brand, but members of this group were not motivated by this knowledge when planning their site visit. It is concluded that the WH brand may function as a placebo, and that its importance may be tied more to political interests than economic advancement. Thus, dependency on the WH List for tourism development may potentially be detrimental for locations in the long term. The WH brand's placebo effect could result in long-term problems for both the site and those whose livelihoods depend on tourism.

Keywords
World Heritage tourism, World Heritage brand, branding, placebo brand
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72303 (URN)10.1080/09669582.2017.1359277 (DOI)000427731100004 ()
Available from: 2018-04-10 Created: 2018-04-10 Last updated: 2018-04-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7734-4587

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