lnu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 70) Show all publications
Gössling, S., Zeiss, H., Hall, C. M., Martin-Rios, C., Ram, Y. & Grøtte, I.-P. (2018). A cross-country comparison of accommodation manager perspectives on online review manipulation. Current Issues in Tourism, 1-20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A cross-country comparison of accommodation manager perspectives on online review manipulation
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Current Issues in Tourism, ISSN 1368-3500, E-ISSN 1747-7603, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Accommodation businesses are increasingly dependent on a limited number of reservation platforms. A significant feature of these platforms is guest evaluations, which are transformed into ratings and rankings. As the positioning of the business in comparison to competitors determines customer demand, accommodation managers have considerable interest in maintaining or improving their online reputation. One response may be to engage in manipulation strategies. This paper presents the results of a survey including 270 hotel managers in five countries, Germany, Israel, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland. Managers confirm growing competition as a result of ratings and rankings, and they report that guests are increasingly aware of the importance of reviews. To avert negative online feedback impacts, managers intervene strategically. The paper discusses new market pressures, emergent consumer judgement culture and consumer citizenship, opportunities for legal redress and the emerging importance of reputation management strategies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Consumer citizenship, hotels, manipulation, online reviews, rankings, ratings
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72449 (URN)10.1080/13683500.2018.1455171 (DOI)2-s2.0-85044251436 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-09 Created: 2018-04-09 Last updated: 2018-04-09
Baird, T., Hall, C. M. & Castka, P. (2018). New Zealand Winegrowers Attitudes and Behaviours towards Wine Tourism and Sustainable Winegrowing. Sustainability, 10(3), Article ID 797.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New Zealand Winegrowers Attitudes and Behaviours towards Wine Tourism and Sustainable Winegrowing
2018 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 3, article id 797Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There are significant economic, environmental, social, and marketing issues that exist from the supply-side perspective in response to sustainability. This study examines New Zealand winegrowers in terms of their attitudes and behaviours towards wine tourism and sustainable wine production. A national survey was conducted at the end of 2015, which was the fourth such survey to be undertaken as part of a longitudinal study of wine tourism in New Zealand. This survey drew on issues of wine and biosecurity, climate change, and eco-labelling, as well as wine tourism. These issues were examined within the context of three key drivers of sustainability: the physical aspects of sustainable wine production, the internal drivers within wine businesses for the adoption of sustainable practices, and the external regulatory aspects that govern the adoption of sustainable wine production practices. The findings indicate that there were substantial concerns with the perceived value provided by both wine tourism and sustainable winegrowing practices. These concerns exist at both the firm level and with the governing bodies that are responsible for implementing sustainable winegrowing initiatives. Unless this perception of the value of sustainability within the New Zealand wine industry is altered in the future, it appears that there will continue to be an ongoing issue as to how sustainable winegrowing initiatives are implemented.

Keywords
wine tourism, sustainable winegrowing, rural development, regional development, biosecurity, branding, partial-industrialisation, innovation, climate change
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-76486 (URN)10.3390/su10030797 (DOI)000428567100224 ()
Available from: 2018-07-10 Created: 2018-07-10 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Darbi, W. P., Hall, C. M. & Knott, P. (2018). The Informal Sector: A Review and Agenda for Management Research. International journal of management reviews (Print), 20(2), 301-324
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Informal Sector: A Review and Agenda for Management Research
2018 (English)In: International journal of management reviews (Print), ISSN 1460-8545, E-ISSN 1468-2370, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 301-324Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite its connotations of non-compliance, illegality, social exploitation and marginality, the informal sector is a substantial contributor to economic life in developing countries and, increasingly, in more technologically advanced activities. Its prevalence in developed economies has also become more widely recognized. In light of its significance, this paper reviews research on the informal sector from a management and organization scholarship perspective, rather than from an entrepreneurship view, as has been the focus until now. It sets out the atypical management practices that are inherent in the sector, explores the under-researched relationship between formal and informal firms, and highlights definitional, conceptual and other limitations in extant research. As a step in resolving these issues, the authors present a conceptual model of formality and informality in a three-dimensional framework that highlights an organizational infrastructure dimension, a view of firms operating along a continuum, and a multi-level analytical context. Building on this, the authors detail opportunities for enhanced appreciation of in situ management and organizational practices in the informal sector and outline tools for pursuing a management and organization scholarship agenda. Overall, the authors argue that management scholarship has great potential to improve understanding of the informal sector, and that the informal sector provides opportunities to advance management theory, research and practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-76483 (URN)10.1111/ijmr.12131 (DOI)000429712700006 ()
Available from: 2018-07-10 Created: 2018-07-10 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Gössling, S., Hall, C. M. & Andersson, A.-C. (2018). The manager's dilemma: a conceptualization of online review manipulation strategies. Current Issues in Tourism, 21(5), 484-503
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The manager's dilemma: a conceptualization of online review manipulation strategies
2018 (English)In: Current Issues in Tourism, ISSN 1368-3500, E-ISSN 1747-7603, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 484-503Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Online evaluations are one of the most important innovations in tourism in recent years, often combining a review/rating (business-specific evaluation) and a ranking (inter-business comparison). As online reputation determines economic success, tourism managers may be tempted to manipulate online content. This paper presents the results from a qualitative study involving 20 hotel managers in southern Sweden, and their perspectives on manipulation. Results confirm that there exists a wide range of review manipulation strategies, many of which are difficult to control. Even though only few managers appear to systematically manipulate, online evaluations represent a significant challenge for businesses, as they introduce direct competition and foster consumer judgement cultures. It is postulated that managers will increasingly find themselves in a Prisoner's dilemma, representing a situation where engaging in manipulation is the most rational choice in an increasingly competitive market situation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Economy, Business administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-48762 (URN)10.1080/13683500.2015.1127337 (DOI)000423747800002 ()
Available from: 2016-01-13 Created: 2016-01-13 Last updated: 2018-02-15Bibliographically approved
Hall, C. M. & Ram, Y. (2018). Walk score (R) and its potential contribution to the study of active transport and walkability: A critical and systematic review. Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, 61, 310-324
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Walk score (R) and its potential contribution to the study of active transport and walkability: A critical and systematic review
2018 (English)In: Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, ISSN 1361-9209, E-ISSN 1879-2340, Vol. 61, p. 310-324Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Walk Score (R) index has become increasingly applied in studies of walking and walkability. The index assesses the "walking potential" of a place through a combination of three elements: the shortest distance to a group of preselected destinations, the block length, and the intersection density around the origin. The Index links a gravity-based measure (distance accessibility), with topological accessibility (street connectivity) measured by two complementary indicators that act as penalties in the final score (R) (linearly expanded in the range 0-100). A systematic review of Scopus (R) and Web of Science was conducted with 42 journal articles eventually being evaluated. Research was primarily undertaken in North American urban geographies. Analysis of walk ability using Walk Score (R) is inconsistent. Twenty-nine papers do not exclusively relying on Walk Score (R) as a single measurement of walkability and add further estimates to better capture the multiple dimensions of walkability. In 33 studies the Walk Score (R) was used as an independent variable, and only once as a mediating-moderating variable. In eight papers (18%) the Walk Score (R) was a part of a bivariate correlation model. On no occasion was it used as a dependent variable. Results tend to only partly support the validity of Walk Score (R). The paper concludes that the Index is best understood as a surrogate measure of the density of the built environment of a specific neighborhood that indicates utilitarian walking potential. Implications for, and potential areas of, future research are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Active transport, Built environment, Leisure walking, Utilitarian walking, Walk Score (R), Walkability
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77011 (URN)10.1016/j.trd.2017.12.018 (DOI)000438003400008 ()
Available from: 2018-07-27 Created: 2018-07-27 Last updated: 2018-07-27Bibliographically approved
Adie, B. A., Hall, C. M. & Prayag, G. (2018). World Heritage as a placebo brand: a comparative analysis of three sites and marketing implications. Journal of Sustainable Tourism, 26(3), 399-415
Open this publication in new window or tab >>World Heritage as a placebo brand: a comparative analysis of three sites and marketing implications
2018 (English)In: Journal of Sustainable Tourism, ISSN 0966-9582, E-ISSN 1747-7646, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 399-415Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The UNESCO World Heritage (WH) List is often regarded as a successful tourism brand that motivates site nominations. However, there is relatively little research dealing specifically with WH brand attraction effects, and what does exist shows conflicting results. There is a significant research gap in terms of awareness of the WH brand and its potential impact on visitation, which this study seeks to fill through a comparative analysis of three diverse case studies: Independence Hall, USA; Studenica Monastery, Serbia; and the Archaeological Site of Volubilis, Morocco. Survey data (n = 771) from these three sites were collected and analyzed resulting in three distinct clusters of visitors. One of the clusters does exhibit higher levels of awareness of the WH brand, but members of this group were not motivated by this knowledge when planning their site visit. It is concluded that the WH brand may function as a placebo, and that its importance may be tied more to political interests than economic advancement. Thus, dependency on the WH List for tourism development may potentially be detrimental for locations in the long term. The WH brand's placebo effect could result in long-term problems for both the site and those whose livelihoods depend on tourism.

Keywords
World Heritage tourism, World Heritage brand, branding, placebo brand
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72303 (URN)10.1080/09669582.2017.1359277 (DOI)000427731100004 ()
Available from: 2018-04-10 Created: 2018-04-10 Last updated: 2018-04-10Bibliographically approved
Truong, V. D. & Hall, C. M. (2017). Corporate social marketing in tourism: to sleep or not to sleep with the enemy?. Journal of Sustainable Tourism, 25(7), 884-902
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Corporate social marketing in tourism: to sleep or not to sleep with the enemy?
2017 (English)In: Journal of Sustainable Tourism, ISSN 0966-9582, E-ISSN 1747-7646, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 884-902Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Social marketing is regarded as an effective consumer-oriented approach to promoting behavioural change and improved well-being for individuals, communities and society. However, its potential for tourism, especially sustainable tourism, remains under-researched. This article examines the utilisation of social marketing by tourism businesses. A search strategy identified 14 behavioural change programmes that involved tourism businesses. Half of these programmes label themselves social marketing; the others tend to be part of corporate social responsibility efforts, using a form of corporate social marketing (CSM). Most programmes seek to encourage pro-environmental behaviours in tourists, tourism businesses and other stakeholders including suppliers. Although tourism businesses can develop social marketing programmes alone, typically they collaborate with public and non-profit agencies as partners and sponsors. The strength of the tie between the promoted behaviour and the sale of a company's product varies considerably. It is suggested that social marketing can make significant contributions to environmentally sustainable tourism. However, this research also suggests that social marketing is not a substitute for, but rather an essential complement to, technological and regulatory approaches to climate change. Changing behaviour is a long process: without a long-term commitment from private sector companies, CSM programmes will fail to achieve behavioural change goals.

Keywords
Behavioural change, corporate social marketing, corporate social responsibility, public-private partnership, social marketing campaigns, sustainable consumption
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-67012 (URN)10.1080/09669582.2016.1201093 (DOI)000401063900002 ()
Available from: 2017-07-18 Created: 2017-07-18 Last updated: 2017-07-18Bibliographically approved
Nunkoo, R., Hall, C. M. & Ladsawut, J. (2017). Gender and choice of methodology in tourism social science research. Annals of Tourism Research, 63, 207-210
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender and choice of methodology in tourism social science research
2017 (English)In: Annals of Tourism Research, ISSN 0160-7383, E-ISSN 1873-7722, Vol. 63, p. 207-210Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Pergamon Press, 2017
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-64208 (URN)10.1016/j.annals.2017.01.002 (DOI)000398014400019 ()
Available from: 2017-05-23 Created: 2017-05-23 Last updated: 2017-05-23Bibliographically approved
Amore, A., Hall, C. M. & Jenkins, J. (2017). They never said "Come here and let's talk about it': Exclusion and non-decision-making in the rebuild of Christchurch, New Zealand. Local Economy, 32(7), 617-639
Open this publication in new window or tab >>They never said "Come here and let's talk about it': Exclusion and non-decision-making in the rebuild of Christchurch, New Zealand
2017 (English)In: Local Economy, ISSN 0269-0942, E-ISSN 1470-9325, Vol. 32, no 7, p. 617-639Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Decision-making in urban contexts is increasingly characterized by a depoliticized environment that has normalized neoliberal urban policies. These are further pursued in post-disaster contexts across the globe with narratives that overshadow the views and demands of the affected communities. Spatial contestation, exclusion of certain groups from key decisions and episodes of non-decision-making thus shape urban redevelopment through top-down governance. This paper provides a Lukesian narrative on post-earthquake Christchurch, where the redevelopment of the city has been characterized by a strong command-and-control rebuild agenda emanating from the national government, regardless of the feedback and criticisms from the affected community.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
decision-making, grassroots organizations, non-decision-making, post-disaster governance, power, spatial contestation
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72120 (URN)10.1177/0269094217734326 (DOI)000415045700003 ()
Available from: 2018-04-04 Created: 2018-04-04 Last updated: 2018-04-04Bibliographically approved
Roy, H., Hall, C. M. & Ballantine, P. W. (2017). Trust in local food networks: The role of trust among tourism stakeholders and their impacts in purchasing decisions. Journal of Destination Marketing & Management, 6(4), 309-317
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trust in local food networks: The role of trust among tourism stakeholders and their impacts in purchasing decisions
2017 (English)In: Journal of Destination Marketing & Management, ISSN 2212-571X, E-ISSN 2212-5752, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 309-317Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Trust and personal relationships are regarded as critical elements of local food systems. This study examines the role of trust and personal relationships among tourism stakeholders (restaurants and chefs, wholesale distributors, and local farmers and/or farmers' market vendors) in the purchase of local foods on a study conducted in Vancouver, Canada, and Christchurch, New Zealand. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with restaurants and chefs, farmers and/or farmers' market vendors, and wholesale distributors. The study identified that the trust dimension of relationships is very important for restaurants and chefs and wholesale distributors with respect to local food sourcing activities. The study also found social interaction and face-to-face relations that enable deep trust (due to the knowledge transfer involved) to be vital for restaurants and chefs and wholesale distributors in the purchasing of local food from farmers and/or farmers' market vendors, and other producers/suppliers. The major implications of the findings are that farmers need to develop trust-based relationships with their buyers in order to create better market access for local foods but that existing trust relationships can also act as a barrier to new entrants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Trust, Local food, Purchasing, Supply chain, Restaurant supply, Food wholesalers
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-70250 (URN)10.1016/j.jdmm.2017.07.002 (DOI)000419415200004 ()
Available from: 2018-01-30 Created: 2018-01-30 Last updated: 2018-01-30Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7734-4587

Search in DiVA

Show all publications