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BETA
Sanati, Mehri
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 25) Show all publications
Brandin, J., Einvall, J. & Sanati, M. (2008). Effect of fly ash and H2S on a Ni-based catalyst for the upgrading of a biomass-generated gas. Biomass and Bioenergy, 32(4), 345-353
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of fly ash and H2S on a Ni-based catalyst for the upgrading of a biomass-generated gas
2008 (English)In: Biomass and Bioenergy, ISSN 0961-9534, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 345-353Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2008
Research subject
Natural Science, Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vxu:diva-3677 (URN)
Available from: 2008-12-08 Created: 2008-12-08 Last updated: 2015-11-16Bibliographically approved
Lutic, D., Strand, M. & Sanati, M. (2007). Catalytic properties of oxide nanoparticles applied in gas sensors. TOPICS IN CATALYSIS, 45(1-4), 105-109
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Catalytic properties of oxide nanoparticles applied in gas sensors
2007 (English)In: TOPICS IN CATALYSIS, ISSN 1022-5528, Vol. 45, no 1-4, p. 105-109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A series of gas sensing layers based on indium oxide doped with gold were prepared by using the aerosol technology for deposition as the active contact layer in a metal oxide semiconductor capacitive device. The interaction between the measured species and the insulator surface was quantified as the voltage changes at a constant capacitance of the device. The sensor properties were investigated in the presence of H2, CO, NH3, NO, NO2 and C3H6 at temperatures between 100–400 °C. Significant differences in the morphology of the layer and its sensitivity were noted for different preparation methods and different gas environments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER/PLENUM PUBLISHERS, 233 SPRING ST, NEW YORK, NY 10013 USA, 2007
National Category
Physical Chemistry
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Bioenergy Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vxu:diva-2769 (URN)10.1007/s11244-007-0248-1 (DOI)
Available from: 2007-12-14 Created: 2007-12-14 Last updated: 2017-10-12Bibliographically approved
Larsson, A.-C., Einvall, J. & Sanati, M. (2007). Deactivation of SCR Catalysts by Exposure to Aerosol Particles of Potassium and Zinc Salts. Aerosol Science and Technology, 41(4), 369-379
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deactivation of SCR Catalysts by Exposure to Aerosol Particles of Potassium and Zinc Salts
2007 (English)In: Aerosol Science and Technology, ISSN 0278-6826, E-ISSN 1521-7388, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 369-379Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Generated aerosol particle deposition has been applied in laboratory scale to induce deactivation of commercial Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts Of V2O5-WO3/TiO2 monolithic type. The monolithic catalyst has been exposed to the generated submicrometer particle of inorganic salts, KCl, K2SO4, and ZnCl2 at 200 degrees C in a tubular reactor. The generated particles have been deposited on the catalytic surfaces by utilization of an electrostatic field. Physical characterization of the generated aerosol particles were conducted by Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and Electric Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI) with and without catalyst in order to investigate the magnitude of the particle deposition. Particle charge distribution was also evaluated with a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (TDMA) set up.

SCR is the most common method to commercially reduce NOx emissions from combustion processes. Catalyst lifetime is important for process economics and extending catalyst life can allow future strengthened emission legislation and diminished NOx emissions.

Verification of particle deposition has been conducted through comparison with catalyst samples exposed to commercial biomass combustion condition.

The reactivity of both fresh and exposed catalyst samples as well as commercially used samples was examined in SCR reaction and the methods of deposition as well as the influence of the different salts on catalytic performance have been explored.

Catalyst samples have been evaluated with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) with respect to surface morphology of the catalyst material. The laboratory deactivated catalyst samples showed resemblance with the commercially exposed catalyst sample with respect to salts concentration and deposition of the salts particles. The obtained influence on catalyst activity was comparable with commercially obtained catalyst activity reductions at comparable potassium concentration levels.

National Category
Energy Engineering
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Bioenergy Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vxu:diva-4261 (URN)10.1080/02786820701203207 (DOI)
Available from: 2007-12-14 Created: 2007-12-14 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Brandin, J., Einvall, J. & Sanati, M. (2007). Effects of fly ashes on Pt-Rh/MgAl(O) catalyst for the upgrading of the product gas from biomass gasification. In: 15th European Biomass Conference & Exhibition (pp. 1197-1200).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of fly ashes on Pt-Rh/MgAl(O) catalyst for the upgrading of the product gas from biomass gasification
2007 (English)In: 15th European Biomass Conference & Exhibition, 2007, p. 1197-1200Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Research subject
Natural Science, Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vxu:diva-3130 (URN)3-936338-21-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2008-01-07 Created: 2008-01-07 Last updated: 2015-11-16Bibliographically approved
Brandin, J., Einvall, J. & Sanati, M. (2007). Effects of H2S and fly ash on Ni based catalyst for the reforming of a product gas from biomass gasification:. In: Europacat VIII.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of H2S and fly ash on Ni based catalyst for the reforming of a product gas from biomass gasification:
2007 (English)In: Europacat VIII, 2007Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Research subject
Natural Science, Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vxu:diva-3131 (URN)
Available from: 2008-01-07 Created: 2008-01-07 Last updated: 2015-11-16Bibliographically approved
Strand, M. & Sanati, M. (2007). Fly ash elementary composition in a moving grate boiler fired with sulphur-doped woody fuel. In: 15th European Biomass Conference and Exhibition (pp. 1468-1469). ETA-Renewable Energies and WIP-Renewable Energies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fly ash elementary composition in a moving grate boiler fired with sulphur-doped woody fuel
2007 (English)In: 15th European Biomass Conference and Exhibition, ETA-Renewable Energies and WIP-Renewable Energies , 2007, p. 1468-1469Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The elementary composition of fly ash particles in the size range of 0.03-1.64 mm were studied in a 7 MW moving-grate boiler fired with moist sawmill residues together with varying admixtures of elementary sulphur. Size segregated elementary analysis showed that the main elements were K, S, Cl and Zn and that there were no enrichment of any of these elements in any size fraction. When a sulphur admixture of 0.25 % was used the concentration of S increased, and the particles were almost completely depleted of Cl. Sulphur admixture had no significant effect on the concentration or distribution of the trace elements analysed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ETA-Renewable Energies and WIP-Renewable Energies, 2007
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Bioenergy Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vxu:diva-2775 (URN)978-88-89407-59-X (ISBN)
Available from: 2007-12-14 Created: 2007-12-14 Last updated: 2010-09-03Bibliographically approved
Einvall, J., Albertazzi, S., Hulteberg, C., Malik, A., Basile, F., Larsson, A.-C., . . . Sanati, M. (2007). Investigation of reforming catalyst deactivation by exposure to fly ash from biomass gasification in laboratory scale. Energy & Fuels, 21(5), 2481-2488
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigation of reforming catalyst deactivation by exposure to fly ash from biomass gasification in laboratory scale
Show others...
2007 (English)In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 2481-2488Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Production of synthesis gas by catalytic reforming of product gas from biomass gasification can lead to catalyst deactivation by the exposure to ash compounds present in the flue gas. The impact of fly ash from biomass gasification on reforming catalysts was studied at the laboratory scale. The investigated catalyst was Pt/Rh based, and it was exposed to generated K2SO4 aerosol particles and to aerosol particles produced from the water-soluble part of biomass fly ash, originating from a commercial biomass combustion plant. The noble metal catalyst was also compared with a commercial Ni-based catalyst, exposed to aerosol particles of the same fashion. To investigate the deactivation by aerosol particles, a flow containing submicrometer-size selected aerosol particles was led through the catalyst bed. The particle size of the poison was measured prior to the catalytic reactor system. Fresh and aerosol particle exposed catalysts were characterized using BET surface area, XRPD (X-ray powder diffraction), and H2 chemisorption. The Pt/Rh catalyst was also investigated for activity in the steam methane reforming reaction. It was found that the method to deposit generated aerosol particles on reforming catalysts could be a useful procedure to investigate the impact of different compounds possibly present in the product gas from the gasifier, acting as potential catalyst poisons. The catalytic deactivation procedure by exposure to aerosol particles is somehow similar to what happens in a real plant, when a catalyst bed is located subsequent to a biomass gasifier or a combustion boiler. Using different environments (oxidizing, reducing, steam present, etc.) in the aerosol generation adds further flexibility to the suggested aerosol deactivation method. It is essential to investigate the deactivating effect at the laboratory scale before a full-scale plant is taken into operation to avoid operational problems.

National Category
Energy Systems
Research subject
Chemistry, Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vxu:diva-2765 (URN)10.1021/ef060633k (DOI)
Available from: 2007-12-14 Created: 2007-12-14 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, E., Strand, M. & Sanati, M. (2007). Measurement of Aerosol Particles from Steam and Oxygen Blown Gasification of Wood Pellets in a 20 kW Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidised Bed (ABFB) Gasifier. In: 15th European Biomass Conference & Exhibition: From Research to Market Deployment (pp. 1128-1130). ETA-Renewable Energies and WIP-Renewable Energies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measurement of Aerosol Particles from Steam and Oxygen Blown Gasification of Wood Pellets in a 20 kW Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidised Bed (ABFB) Gasifier
2007 (English)In: 15th European Biomass Conference & Exhibition: From Research to Market Deployment, ETA-Renewable Energies and WIP-Renewable Energies , 2007, p. 1128-1130Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the present study, the particle number and mass size distributions from two measurements on steam and oxygen blown atmospheric bubbling fluidised bed (ABFB) gasification (20 kW) of wood pellets are presented. The total particle number concentration determined using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) varied between 5.1x10^5-6.6x10^6 particles/cm3 (mobility equivalent diameter (dB) 10-670 nm), with the largest variation for particles with dB<100 nm. The particle number size distributions were bimodal with modes at 20-30 nm and at 260-410 nm. The particle mass concentrations determined using a low pressure impactor (LPI) varied between 60-310 mg/m3 for particles with aerodynamic diameter (dae)<5 µm, with modes at 0.2-0.3 µm and at 2-3 µm.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ETA-Renewable Energies and WIP-Renewable Energies, 2007
Keywords
atmospheric bubbling fluidised bed (ABFB), aerosols, gasification
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Bioenergy Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vxu:diva-2766 (URN)978-88-89407-59-X (ISBN)
Available from: 2007-12-14 Created: 2007-12-14 Last updated: 2010-09-03Bibliographically approved
Larsson, A.-C., Einvall, J., Andersson, A. & Sanati, M. (2007). Physical and chemical characterisation of potassium deactivation of a SCR catalyst for biomass combustion. Topics in catalysis, 45(1-4), 149-152
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical and chemical characterisation of potassium deactivation of a SCR catalyst for biomass combustion
2007 (English)In: Topics in catalysis, ISSN 1022-5528, E-ISSN 1572-9028, Vol. 45, no 1-4, p. 149-152Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The deactivation of a commercial Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalyst, of V2O5-WO3/TiO2 type, has been studied through comparisons with results from a full-scale biomass combustion plant to that with laboratory experiments. In the latter, the catalyst was exposed to KCl and K2SO4 by both wet impregnation with diluted salt solutions and deposition of generated submicrometer aerosol particles by means of an electrostatic field. The reactivity of fresh and deactivated samples was examined in the SCR reaction. Chemical and physical characterizations were focusing on internal structures and chemical composition. Deposition of submicrometer sized particles on the monolithic SCR catalyst was shown to induce deactivation with characteristics resembling those obtained in a commercial biomass combustion plant.

Keywords
deactivation, poisoning, V2O5−WO3/TiO2 catalyst, SCR, aerosol particle, KCl, K2SO4, biomass combustion
National Category
Chemical Process Engineering
Research subject
Chemistry, Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vxu:diva-2767 (URN)10.1007/s11244-007-0256-1 (DOI)
Available from: 2007-12-14 Created: 2007-12-14 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, E., Strand, M. & Sanati, M. (2007). Physical and Chemical Characterization of Aerosol Particles Formed during the Thermochemical Conversion of Wood Pellets Using a Bubbling Fluidized Bed Gasifier. Energy Fuels, 21(6), 3660-3667
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical and Chemical Characterization of Aerosol Particles Formed during the Thermochemical Conversion of Wood Pellets Using a Bubbling Fluidized Bed Gasifier
2007 (English)In: Energy Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 3660-3667Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Product gas obtained through biomass gasification can be upgraded to hydrogen-rich synthesis gas. The synthesis gas can be further converted to liquid or gaseous fuels. However, the raw product gas contains both gas- and particle-phase impurities that can negatively affect both catalysts and hot-gas filters used for upgrading and cleaning. The present study aimed to characterize, both physically and chemically, aerosol particles formed during the steam- and oxygen-blown biomass gasification of wood pellets in an atmospheric 20 kW bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) gasifier. The product gas from the gasifier was sampled upstream from the cyclone at 500 °C. The particle number size distribution determined using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) was bimodal, with modes at 20–30 and 400 nm, mobility equivalent diameters (dB). The total mean number concentration of particles with dB = 15–670 nm was approximately 7 × 10^5 particles/cm3; however, the concentration of particles with dB < 80 nm fluctuated. The particle mass size distribution determined using a low-pressure impactor (LPI) was bimodal, and the total mass concentration of particles with aerodynamic diameters (dae) < 5 µm was 310 mg/m3. Microscopy analysis of particulate matter on the lower LPI stages, expected to sample particles with dae < 0.4 µm, revealed structures approximately 10 µm in diameter. In addition, the mass concentration of particles with dae < 0.5 µm determined using a LPI was higher than that estimated using a SMPS, possibly because of the bounce-off or re-entrainment of coarser particles from higher LPI stages. Elementary analysis of the particulate matter indicated that it was dominated by carbon. The collected particulate matter was stable when heated in nitrogen to 500 °C, indicating that the carbon was not present as volatile tars but more likely as char or soot. The particulate matter collected on all LPI stages contained a small percentage of ash (noncarbonaceous inorganic material), with calcium as the dominant element.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society, Washington DC, 2007
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Bioenergy Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vxu:diva-2764 (URN)doi:10.1021/ef7002552 (DOI)
Available from: 2007-12-14 Created: 2007-12-14 Last updated: 2011-04-27Bibliographically approved
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