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Bylund Grenklo, Tove
Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Grimheden, S., Lindqvist, G., Bylund Grenklo, T. & Sandgren, A. (2017). An obligation to care for seriously ill children in their homes: a qualitative study of community nurses' perceptions. Nordic journal of nursing research, 37(4), 201-208
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An obligation to care for seriously ill children in their homes: a qualitative study of community nurses' perceptions
2017 (English)In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 201-208Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

When children are seriously ill, being able to be cared for at home with the family is valuable, but community nurses are often not trained to care for children. The aim of this study was therefore to describe community nurses´perceptions of caring for serioulsy ill children at home. A content analysis was conducted of 11 semi-structed interviews with nurses. One theme, obligation to care, was found, followed by three categories: making an impact, feeling confident, and emotional processing. In conclusion, we found collaboration with paediatric staff in the hospital is important for community nurses in order to gain confidence, which would optimise care at home for seriously ill children and their families.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
Community nursing, Home care, Obligation to care, Qualitative content analysis, Seriously ill children
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-62591 (URN)10.1177/2057158517701664 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-04-25 Created: 2017-04-25 Last updated: 2019-01-17Bibliographically approved
Beernaert, K., Kreicbergs, U., Furst, C. J., Nyberg, T., Steineck, G. & Bylund Grenklo, T. (2017). Distrust in the End-of-Life Care Provided to a Parent and Long-Term Negative Outcomes Among Bereaved Adolescents: A Population-Based Survey Study. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 35(27), 3136-+
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distrust in the End-of-Life Care Provided to a Parent and Long-Term Negative Outcomes Among Bereaved Adolescents: A Population-Based Survey Study
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 35, no 27, p. 3136-+Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose Previous research shows that the death of a parent places children at risk for a number of negative outcomes. The role of trust in health care at the end of life has been acknowledged as crucial for patients and adult family members. However, the consequences of children's distrust in the care provided to their parents remain unknown. Therefore, we investigated the negative long-term outcomes of cancer-bereaved sons' and daughters' distrust in the care that was provided to a dying parent. Methods We used a population-based nationwide survey to investigate self-reported distrust in the care provided and possible negative outcomes in 622 (73%) participants who had lost a parent as a result of cancer 6 to 9 years earlier, at ages 13 to 16 years. All participants were 18 years or older at the time of the survey. Results In those who reported no or little trust (ie, distrust) in the health care provided to their dying parents, we found statistically significantly higher risks of various negative outcomes at the time of survey: bitterness toward health care professionals for not having done everything that was possible (crude risk ratio [RR], 3.5; 95% CI, 2.3 to 5.1) and for having stopped treatment (RR, 3.4; 95% CI, 2.1 to 6.0), self-destructiveness (eg, self-injury [RR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2 to 2.4]), and psychological problems (eg, moderate to severe depression according to the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 [RR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.5 to 3.5]). Conclusion In cancer-bereaved former adolescents, distrust in the health care provided to the dying parent is associated with a higher risk of negative long-term outcomes. The health care professionals involved in this care might play an important role in safeguarding the trust of adolescents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society of Clinical Oncology, 2017
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-68144 (URN)10.1200/JCO.2017.72.9814 (DOI)000410726800009 ()28787258 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85029685358 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-02 Created: 2017-10-02 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved
Alvariza, A., Lovgren, M., Bylund Grenklo, T., Hakola, P., Furst, C. J. & Kreicbergs, U. (2017). How to support teenagers who are losing a parent to cancer: Bereaved young adults' advice to healthcare professionals-A nationwide survey. Palliative & Supportive Care, 15(3), 313-319
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How to support teenagers who are losing a parent to cancer: Bereaved young adults' advice to healthcare professionals-A nationwide survey
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2017 (English)In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 313-319Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The loss of a parent to cancer is considered one of the most traumatic events a teenager can experience. Studies have shown that teenagers, from the time of diagnosis, are already extremely worried about the consequences of a parent's cancer but tend to be left to manage these concerns on their own. The present study aimed to explore young adults' advice to healthcare professionals on how to support teenagers who are losing a parent to cancer. Methods: This work derives from a Swedish nationwide survey and employs a qualitative approach with a descriptive/interpretive design to obtain answers to an open-ended question concerning advice to healthcare professionals. Of the 851 eligible young adults who had lost a parent to cancer when they were 13-16 years of age within the previous 6 to 9 years, 622 participated in our survey (response rate = 73%). Of these 622 young adults, 481 responded to the open-ended question about what advice to give healthcare professionals. Results: Four themes emerged: (1) to be seen and acknowledged; (2) to understand and prepare for illness, treatment, and the impending death; (3) to spend time with the ill parent, and (4) to receive support tailored to the individual teenager's needs. Significance of Results: This nationwide study contributes hands-on suggestions to healthcare staff regarding attitudes, communication, and support from the perspective of young adults who, in their teenage years, lost a parent to cancer. Teenagers may feel better supported during a parent's illness if healthcare professionals take this manageable advice forward into practice and see each teenager as individuals; explain the disease, its treatments, and consequences; encourage teenagers to spend time with their ill parent; and recommend sources of support.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2017
Keywords
Teenagers, Cancer, Support, Dying, Healthcare professionals
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-66972 (URN)10.1017/S1478951516000730 (DOI)000402809900006 ()27692012 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84989950226 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-07-20 Created: 2017-07-20 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Lovgren, M., Bylund Grenklo, T., Jalmsell, L., Wallin, A. E. & Kreicbergs, U. (2016). Bereaved Siblings' Advice to Health Care Professionals Working With Children With Cancer and Their Families. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 33(4), 297-305
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bereaved Siblings' Advice to Health Care Professionals Working With Children With Cancer and Their Families
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1043-4542, E-ISSN 1532-8457, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 297-305Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Siblings of children with cancer experience psychosocial distress during the illness and after bereavement, but often stand outside the spotlight of attention and care. This study explored bereaved siblings' advice to health care professionals (HCPs) working with children with cancer and their families. Materials and Methods: In a nationwide Swedish survey of bereaved siblings, 174/240 (73%) participated. Of these, 108 answered an open-ended question about what advice they would give to HCPs working with children with cancer and their families. In this study, responses to this single question were analyzed using content analysis. Results: The most common advice, suggested by 56% of siblings, related to their own support. One third suggested giving better medical information to siblings. Some siblings wanted to be more practically involved in their brother's/sister's care and suggested that HCPs should give parents guidance on how to involve siblings. Other common advice related to psychosocial aspects, such as the siblings' wish for HCPs to mediate hope, yet also realism, and the importance of asking the ill child about what care they wanted. Conclusion: Information, communication, and involvement should be emphasized by HCPs to support siblings' psychosocial needs in both the health care setting and within the family.

Keywords
siblings, bereavement, pediatric palliative care, psychosocial issues, health care professionals
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-55059 (URN)10.1177/1043454215616605 (DOI)000378422200007 ()26669875 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84977083385 (Scopus ID)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2016-07-26 Created: 2016-07-22 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Bylund Grenklo, T., Furst, C. J., Nyberg, T., Steineck, G. & Kreicbergs, U. (2016). Unresolved grief and its consequences: A nationwide follow-up of teenage loss of a parent to cancer 6-9 years earlier. Supportive Care in Cancer, 24(7), 3095-3103
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unresolved grief and its consequences: A nationwide follow-up of teenage loss of a parent to cancer 6-9 years earlier
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2016 (English)In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 3095-3103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PurposeThe early loss of a parent is a tragedy and a serious life event. This study investigated grief resolution and morbidity in cancer-bereaved teenagers 6 to 9 years after the loss of a parent to cancer.

MethodsIn a nationwide population-based study of 622 of 851 (73 %) youths who as teenagers 6 to 9 years earlier had lost a parent to cancer, we explored the magnitude of unresolved grief and its association with psychological and physiological morbidity. Participants answered a study-specific anonymous questionnaire including questions about if they had worked through their grief and about their current health. Results Six to nine years post-loss 49 % reported unresolved grief (8 % no and 41 % a little grief resolution). They had, in comparison with youths reporting resolved grief. statistically significantly elevated risks, e.g. for insomnia (sons' relative risk (RR) 2.3, 95 % CI 1.3-4.0; daughters' RR 1.7, 95 % CI 1.1-2.7), fatigue (sons' RR 1.8, 95 % CI 1.3-2.5; daughters' RR 1.4, 95 % CI 1.1-1.7) and moderate to severe depression, i.e. score >9, PHQ-9 (sons' RR 3.6, 95 % CI 1.4-8.8; daughters' RR 1.8, 95 % CI 1.1-3.1). Associations remained for insomnia in sons, exhaustion in daughters and fatigue in both sons and daughters when depression, negative intrusive thoughts and avoiding reminders of the parents' disease or death were included in a model. Conclusions Approximately half of cancer-bereaved youth report no or little grief resolution 6 to 9 years post-loss, which is associated with fatigue, sleeping problems and depressive symptoms.

Keywords
Grief, Bereavement, Adolescents, Young adults, Cancer, Depression, Insomnia
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-54679 (URN)10.1007/s00520-016-3118-1 (DOI)000376678400033 ()26899858 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84958811749 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-07-22 Created: 2016-07-21 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Alvariza, A., Holm, M., Bylund Grenklo, T., Goliath, I. & Kreicbergs, U. (2016). Viktigt att stärka närståendes möjligheter att förbereda sig. Läkartidningen, 113(47), 1-3
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Viktigt att stärka närståendes möjligheter att förbereda sig
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2016 (Swedish)In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 113, no 47, p. 1-3Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [sv]

När svårt sjuka patienter vårdas i det egna hemmet har närstående ofta en avgörande roll.

De närstående har också, utöver vårdsituationen, att hantera sina egna känslor kring förlust, sorg och död.

Närstående är ofta otillräckligt förberedda för sin vårdarroll och har behov av information och stöd.

Att vara förberedd har lyfts fram som ett viktigt fenomen för närstående. Det har visat sig relatera till flera positiva faktorer och anses ha en skyddande effekt mot negativa konsekvenser.

Med en öppen, ärlig kommunikation och ett riktat stöd ökar närståendes möjligheter att förbereda sig för en vårdande roll samt det faktum att sjukdomen är obotlig och leder till döden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Swedish Medical Association, 2016
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-87474 (URN)2-s2.0-85000500989 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-09 Created: 2019-08-09 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved
Lovgren, M., Bylund Grenklo, T., Jalmsell, L., Wallin, A. E. & Kreicbergs, U. (2015). Bereaved siblings' advice to health care professionals working with children with cancer and their families. Pediatric Blood & Cancer, 62, S349-S349
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bereaved siblings' advice to health care professionals working with children with cancer and their families
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2015 (English)In: Pediatric Blood & Cancer, ISSN 1545-5009, E-ISSN 1545-5017, Vol. 62, p. S349-S349Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-46888 (URN)000361247201287 ()
Available from: 2015-10-26 Created: 2015-10-26 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
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